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  • contemplation

    aesthetics: The aesthetic recipient: It may also be exercised contemplatively toward nature as a whole. In this case, practical considerations are held in abeyance, and we stand back from nature and look on it with a disinterested concern. Such an attitude is not only peculiar to rational beings but also necessary to them. Without…

  • Contemplations, Les (work by Hugo)

    Victor Hugo: Success (1830–51): …poems that later appeared in Les Contemplations, a volume that he divided into “Autrefois” and “Aujourd’hui,” the moment of his daughter’s death being the mark between yesterday and today. He found relief above all in working on a new novel, which became Les Misérables, published in 1862 after work on…

  • Contemporary Achievements in Painting (lecture by Léger)

    Fernand Léger: …gave a lecture entitled “Contemporary Achievements in Painting,” in which he compared the contrasts in his paintings to the jarring appearance of billboards in the landscape. He argued that such developments should be embraced by painters as an affirmation of faith in modern life and popular culture.

  • contemporary art

    museum: Art museums: In many cases, contemporary art is displayed in a separate institution. The role of such museums is to confront the public with art in the process of development, and there is a considerable experimental component in their exhibits. This is particularly so at the Pompidou Centre in Paris,…

  • Contemporary Art Chicago, Museum of (museum, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    museum: Building design and function: …Kleihues’s design (1996) for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. The concept of the museum as a cathedral, seen among some 19th-century museums and typified in London’s Natural History Museum, also lingers: the massive cylindrical light at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s original building (1995), designed by…

  • Contemporary Art, Museum of (museum, Los Angeles, California, United States)

    California: Cultural institutions: …Museum of Art (1965), the Museum of Contemporary Art (1979) in Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1935). The Music Center of Los Angeles County is a concert and theatre complex that was constructed during the 1960s by private contributions. Tax-supported state institutions, most prominently the…

  • Contemporary Crafts, Museum of (museum, New York City, New York, United States)

    Museum of Arts & Design (MAD), museum in New York, N.Y., dedicated to the collection and exhibition of contemporary works and objects made from clay, glass, wood, metal, and fibre. It emphasizes craft, art, and design but is also concerned with the broader subjects of architecture, fashion,

  • contemporary hit radio (radio format)

    radio: In the United States: These included “contemporary hit radio” (CHR), which emphasized less talk, more focused music playlists, more valuable promotional giveaways, and greater consideration of listeners’ lifestyles in advertising and feature presentations. Another splinter became the “urban” format (itself an outgrowth of the earlier disco music format), which began making…

  • contemporary jazz (music)

    jazz-rock: …development of jazz-rock—contemporary jazz, or light jazz—appeared on the radio in the 1980s and ’90s. The most popular kind of fusion music, it abandoned jazz elements almost completely and frequently used a minimum of improvisation. Stars of contemporary jazz included saxophonist Kenny G and the group Spyro Gyra. Two jazz-rock…

  • Contempt (film by Godard [1963])

    Jean-Luc Godard: Breathless and filmmaking style and themes: …1963 film Le Mépris (Contempt), based on a story by the Italian novelist Alberto Moravia, marked his only venture into orthodox and comparatively expensive filmmaking. Afterward he maintained an almost unique position as an absolute, independent creator, using extraordinarily cheap alfresco production methods and enjoying repeated success on the…

  • contempt (law)

    Contempt, in law, insult to, interference with, or violation of a sovereign court or legislative body. The concept of contempt is of English origin and is found only in countries that follow the common-law system. The primary importance of the notion of contempt is that it warrants judicial action

  • contenance angloise (musical style)

    John Dunstable: …what they learned from Dunstable’s “English manner.”

  • Contender, The (film by Lurie [2000])

    Jeff Bridges: …nomination, for his role in The Contender (2000) as an American president whose vice presidential nominee (played by Joan Allen) becomes embroiled in a sex scandal. His subsequent films include Seabiscuit (2003), Stick It (2006), and Iron Man (2008), which was based on the Marvel Comics comic strip. In 2009…

  • Contending Forces: A Romance Illustrative of Negro Life North and South (novel by Hopkins)

    Pauline Hopkins: …theme for her first novel, Contending Forces: A Romance Illustrative of Negro Life North and South (1900). The plot follows a mixed-race family from early 19th-century slavery in the West Indies and the southern United States to early 20th-century Massachusetts. Hopkins also wrote short stories and biographical articles for the…

  • Contending of Horus and Seth, The (Ramesside text)

    Seth: …theme of the Ramesside text The Contending of Horus and Seth, which borders on satire, and the later, much more sombre version recorded by Plutarch, in which Seth is the embodiment of the Greek demon Typhon.

  • Contending States (Chinese history)

    Warring States, (475–221 bce), designation for seven or more small feuding Chinese kingdoms whose careers collectively constitute an era in Chinese history. The Warring States period was one of the most fertile and influential in Chinese history. It not only saw the rise of many of the great

  • content (aesthetics)

    aesthetics: Relationship between form and content: …seek in it a conceptual content, which it presents to us in the form of an idea. One purpose of critical interpretation is to expound this idea in discursive form—to give the equivalent of the content of the work of art in another, nonsensuous idiom. But criticism can never succeed…

  • content analysis (research technique)

    information processing: Description and content analysis of analog-form records: The collections of libraries and archives, the primary repositories of analog-form information, constitute one-dimensional ordering of physical materials in print (documents), in image form (maps and photographs), or in audio-video format (recordings and videotapes). To break away from the confines…

  • Content and Consciousness (work by Dennett)

    Daniel C. Dennett: …turned into his first book, Content and Consciousness (1969). He received a D.Phil. in philosophy in 1965, whereupon he returned to the United States to teach at the University of California, Irvine. In 1971 he moved to Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, where he was appointed University Professor and became…

  • Content and Form of Yoruba Ijala (work by Babalola)

    S. Adeboye Babalola: His Content and Form of Yoruba Ijala (1966) provides both a critical introduction to this vernacular poetic form and an annotated anthology of ìjalá poems (hunters’ songs), with English translations. His writings are considered among the best recent efforts of scholars to conserve African oral traditions.

  • content filter (technology)

    Content filter, software that screens and blocks online content that includes particular words or images. Although the Internet was designed to make information more accessible, open access to all information can be problematic, especially when it comes to children who might view obscene or

  • content validity (examination)

    psychological testing: Primary characteristics of methods or instruments: …simply to see if its content seems appropriate to its intended purpose. Such content validation is widely employed in measuring academic achievement but with recognition of the inevitable role of judgment. Thus, a geometry test exhibits content (or curricular) validity when experts (e.g., teachers) believe that it adequately samples the…

  • Contention, The (work by Shakespeare)

    Henry VI, Part 3, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written in 1590–93. Like Henry IV, Part 2, it was first published in a corrupt quarto, this time in 1595. The version published in the First Folio of 1623 is considerably longer and seems to have been based on an authorial

  • Contention, The (work by Shakespeare)

    Henry VI, Part 2, chronicle play in five acts by William Shakespeare, written sometime in 1590–92. It was first published in a corrupt quarto in 1594. The version published in the First Folio of 1623 is considerably longer and seems to have been based on an authorial manuscript. Henry VI, Part 2 is

  • contentious jurisdiction (law)

    international law: Peaceful settlement: Contentious jurisdiction enables the court to hear cases between states, provided that the states concerned have given their consent. This consent may be signaled through a special agreement, or compromis (French: “compromise”); through a convention that gives the court jurisdiction over matters that include the…

  • Contes (work by La Fontaine)

    Jean de La Fontaine: Miscellaneous writings and the Contes: …his miscellaneous works, La Fontaine’s Contes et nouvelles en vers (Tales and Novels in Verse) considerably exceed the Fables in bulk. The first of them was published in 1664, the last posthumously. He borrowed them mostly from Italian sources, in particular Giovanni Boccaccio, but he preserved none of the 14th-century…

  • Contes cruels (work by Villiers de L’Isle-Adam)

    Auguste, comte de Villiers de L'Isle-Adam: …stories in Contes cruels (1883; Cruel Tales). The latter, inspired by the works of Edgar Allan Poe, satirize bourgeois morality. Splendidly written, they often have an element of horror or even sadism that reveals both the desire to shock and some of Villiers’s private obsessions.

  • Contes d’Hoffmann, Les (opera by Offenbach)

    The Tales of Hoffmann, opera by German-born French composer Jacques Offenbach, with a French libretto by Michel Carré and Jules Barbier, the latter of whom was a coauthor of the play of the same name, from which the opera was derived. The opera premiered in Paris on February 10, 1881. It was the

  • Contes de fées (work by Aulnoy)

    Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, countess d'Aulnoy: Her best-remembered works are Contes de fées (1697; “Fairy Tales”) and Les Contes nouveaux ou les fées à la mode (1698; “New Tales, or the Fancy of the Fairies”), written in the manner of the great fairy tales of Charles Perrault but laced with her own sardonic touch. Her…

  • Contes de ma mère l’oye (work by Perrault)

    Bluebeard: …Perrault’s collection of fairy tales, Contes de ma mère l’oye (1697; Tales of Mother Goose). In the tale, Bluebeard is a wealthy man of rank who, soon after his marriage, goes away, leaving his wife the keys to all the doors in his castle but forbidding her to open one…

  • Contes drolatiques (short stories by Balzac)

    Droll Stories, collection of short stories by Honoré de Balzac, published in three sets of 10 stories each, in 1832, 1833, and 1837, as Contes drolatiques. Rabelaisian in theme, the stories are written with great vitality in a pastiche of 16th-century language. The tales are fully as lively as the

  • Contes du chat perché, Les (work by Aymé)

    Marcel Aymé: …were published in English as The Wonderful Farm (1951).

  • Contes du lundi, Les (work by Daudet)

    Alphonse Daudet: Life: …second volume of short stories, Les Contes du lundi, 1873; “Monday Tales”), Daudet enlisted in the army, but he fled from Paris during the terrors of the Commune of 1871. His novel Les Aventures prodigieuses de Tartarin de Tarascon (1872; “The Prodigious Adventures of Tartarin de Tarascon”) was not well…

  • Contes du whisky, Les (work by De Kremer)

    Jean Ray: …1925, with the short-story collection, Les Contes du whisky (1925; “Whisky’s Tales”). This collection reveals his characteristic descriptive skill, humorous tone, and ability to create a sinister atmosphere. Deeply Flemish in sensibility (he was a friend of Michel de Ghelderode), he wrote rapidly for a mass audience with which he…

  • Contes et nouvelles en vers (work by La Fontaine)

    Jean de La Fontaine: Miscellaneous writings and the Contes: …his miscellaneous works, La Fontaine’s Contes et nouvelles en vers (Tales and Novels in Verse) considerably exceed the Fables in bulk. The first of them was published in 1664, the last posthumously. He borrowed them mostly from Italian sources, in particular Giovanni Boccaccio, but he preserved none of the 14th-century…

  • Contes et nouvelles en vers (work by La Fontaine)

    Jean de La Fontaine: Miscellaneous writings and the Contes: …his miscellaneous works, La Fontaine’s Contes et nouvelles en vers (Tales and Novels in Verse) considerably exceed the Fables in bulk. The first of them was published in 1664, the last posthumously. He borrowed them mostly from Italian sources, in particular Giovanni Boccaccio, but he preserved none of the 14th-century…

  • Contes nouveaux ou les fées à la mode, Les (work by Aulnoy)

    Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, countess d'Aulnoy: …fées (1697; “Fairy Tales”) and Les Contes nouveaux ou les fées à la mode (1698; “New Tales, or the Fancy of the Fairies”), written in the manner of the great fairy tales of Charles Perrault but laced with her own sardonic touch. Her pseudo-historical novels, which were immensely popular throughout…

  • contestable market (economics)

    economics: Industrial organization: …William Baumol’s concept of “contestable markets”: if a market is easy to enter and to exit, it is “contestable” and hence workably competitive.

  • context effect (psychology)

    perception: Context effects: One of the simplest instance of relational (or context) effects in perception is that of brightness contrast. Thus, the apparent brightness of a stimulus depends not only on its own luminance but also on that of the surrounding stimulation. The same gray square…

  • contextualism (aesthetics)

    music: Contextualist theories: In moving from symbolic to contextualist explanations of music, it is well to note that a source of great confusion, in the former, is the fact that tone painting (with explicit signals that yield, when the code is understood, designative meanings) is widely…

  • Conti family (Bourbon dynastic line)

    Conti family, French branch of the house of Bourbon. The title of prince de Conti, created in the 16th century, was revived in favour of Armand I de Bourbon, prince de Conti (1629–66), who was a leader in the Fronde. He was the younger brother and rival of Louis II de Bourbon, prince de Condé (“the

  • Conti, Antonio (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Reform of the tragic theatre: ) Between 1726 and 1747 Antonio Conti—an admirer of William Shakespeare—wrote four Roman tragedies in blank verse. It was not until 1775, however, with the success of Vittorio Alfieri’s Cleopatra, that an important Italian tragedian finally emerged. In strong contrast with the melodrammi, or musical dramas, of Pietro Metastasio and…

  • Conti, Armand I de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    Armand I de Bourbon, prince de Conti, second son of Henry II de Bourbon, 3rd prince of Condé, and younger brother of Louis II, the Great Condé, and of the duchess of Longueville. The title of prince of Conti was revived in his favour in 1629. Destined for the church, Armand de Bourbon was the

  • Conti, Bill (American composer and recording artist)
  • Conti, François de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    François de Bourbon, prince de Conti, third son of Louis I de Bourbon, 1st prince of Condé; he was given the title of marquis de Conti and between 1581 and 1597 was elevated to the rank of a prince. Conti, who was a Roman Catholic, appears to have taken no part in the Wars of Religion until 1587,

  • Conti, François-Louis de Bourbon, prince de (French noble)

    François-Louis de Bourbon, prince de Conti, younger brother of Louis-Armand I de Bourbon. Naturally possessed of great ability, he received an excellent education and was distinguished for both the independence of his mind and the popularity of his manners. On this account he was not received with

  • Conti, Gregory (antipope [1138])

    Victor (IV), antipope from March to May 29, 1138. He was a cardinal when chosen pope by a faction opposing Pope Innocent II and led by King Roger II of Sicily and the powerful Pierleoni family. Victor succeeded the antipope Anacletus II (Pietro Pierleoni), but the renowned mystic abbot St. Bernard

  • Conti, Louis-Armand I de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    Louis-Armand I de Bourbon, prince de Conti, eldest surviving son of Armand I de Bourbon, prince of Conti; he succeeded his father in 1666. His marriage (1680) to Marie-Anne de Bourbon (1666–1739), daughter of Louis XIV and Louise de La Vallière, was the first union between a prince of the blood and

  • Conti, Louis-Armand II de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    Louis-Armand II de Bourbon, prince de Conti, only surviving son of François-Louis, the Great Conti. He was treated with great liberality by Louis XIV and also by the regent, Philippe, duc d’Orléans. He served under Marshal Villars in the War of the Spanish Succession, but he lacked the soldierly

  • Conti, Louis-François de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    Louis-François de Bourbon, prince de Conti, Louis-Armand II’s second son. He adopted a military career and, when the War of the Austrian Succession broke out in 1741, accompanied Charles Louis, duc de Belle-Isle, to Bohemia. His services there led to his appointment to command the army in Italy,

  • Conti, Louis-François-Joseph de Bourbon, prince de (French prince)

    Louis-François-Joseph de Bourbon, prince de Conti, last of the princes of Conti, the only legitimate son of Louis-François de Bourbon, the former prince. He possessed considerable talent as a soldier and distinguished himself during the Seven Years’ War. He took the side of Maupeou in the struggle

  • Conti, Michelangelo dei (pope)

    Innocent XIII, pope from 1721 to 1724. Of noble birth, Conti was papal ambassador to Switzerland and to Portugal before Pope Clement XI made him cardinal (1706) and bishop of Osimo, Papal States (1709). He was elected pope on May 8, 1721. In the following year he invested the Holy Roman emperor

  • Conti, Michelangiolo dei (pope)

    Innocent XIII, pope from 1721 to 1724. Of noble birth, Conti was papal ambassador to Switzerland and to Portugal before Pope Clement XI made him cardinal (1706) and bishop of Osimo, Papal States (1709). He was elected pope on May 8, 1721. In the following year he invested the Holy Roman emperor

  • Conti, Michelangiolo dei (pope)

    Innocent XIII, pope from 1721 to 1724. Of noble birth, Conti was papal ambassador to Switzerland and to Portugal before Pope Clement XI made him cardinal (1706) and bishop of Osimo, Papal States (1709). He was elected pope on May 8, 1721. In the following year he invested the Holy Roman emperor

  • Conti, Niccolò dei (Italian merchant)

    Niccolò dei Conti, Venetian merchant who brought back a vivid account of his 25 years of travels in southern Asia. As a young man living in Damascus, he learned Arabic. In 1414 he set out for Baghdad, then journeyed down the Tigris River and eventually reached Hormuz, now in Iran, near the southern

  • contiguity, theory of (psychology)

    Theory of contiguity, psychological theory of learning which emphasizes that the only condition necessary for the association of stimuli and responses is that there be a close temporal relationship between them. It holds that learning will occur regardless of whether reinforcement is given, so long

  • contiguous zone (international law)

    international law: Maritime spaces and boundaries: A contiguous zone—which must be claimed and, unlike territorial seas, does not exist automatically—allows coastal states to exercise the control necessary to prevent and punish infringements of customs, sanitary, fiscal, and immigration regulations within and beyond its territory or territorial sea. The zone originally extended 12…

  • contina (architecture)

    Slavic religion: Communal banquets and related practices: Wooden buildings (the so-called continae) in which the faithful Baltic Slavs used to assemble for amusement, to deliberate, or to cook food have been observed in the 20th century among the Votyaks, the Cheremis, and the Mordvins but especially among the Votyaks. Such wooden buildings also existed sparsely in…

  • continae (architecture)

    Slavic religion: Communal banquets and related practices: Wooden buildings (the so-called continae) in which the faithful Baltic Slavs used to assemble for amusement, to deliberate, or to cook food have been observed in the 20th century among the Votyaks, the Cheremis, and the Mordvins but especially among the Votyaks. Such wooden buildings also existed sparsely in…

  • continent (geography)

    Continent, one of the larger continuous masses of land, namely, Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia, listed in order of size. (Europe and Asia are sometimes considered a single continent, Eurasia.) There is great variation in the sizes of continents; Asia

  • continent-continent collision (geology)

    metamorphic rock: Facies series: …whereas areas thought to reflect continent-continent collision are more typically distinguished by greenschist and amphibolite facies rocks (see also subduction zone). Still other regions, usually containing an abundance of intrusive igneous material, show associations of low-pressure greenschist, amphibolite, and granulite facies rocks. These observations led a Japanese petrologist, Akiho Miyashiro,…

  • Continental (region, Equatorial Guinea)

    Equatorial Guinea: It consists of Río Muni (also known as Continental Equatorial Guinea), on the continent, and five islands (known collectively as insular Equatorial Guinea): Bioko (formerly Fernando Po), Corisco, Great Elobey (Elobey Grande), Little Elobey (Elobey Chico), and Annobón (Pagalu). Bata is the administrative capital of the mainland. Formerly…

  • continental accretion (geology)

    continental shield: …of the concept of continental accretion—i.e., that belts of successively younger rocks have undergone intense deformation in episodes of mountain building and have become welded onto the borders of the preexisting shields. In this way, the growth of continents might have occurred through geologic time.

  • continental air mass (meteorology)

    Continental air mass, vast body of air that forms over the interior of a continent, excluding mountainous areas. See air

  • Continental Airlines, Inc. (American company)

    Continental Airlines, Inc., former U.S.-based airline that served North American and overseas destinations via hubs mainly in New York, New York; Cleveland, Ohio; Houston, Texas; and Guam. After a merger with United Airlines, it ceased operations under its own name in 2012. The company traced its

  • Continental Army (United States history)

    Benjamin Rush: …the Middle Department of the Continental Army, but early in 1778 he resigned because he considered the military hospitals mismanaged by his superior, who was supported by General Washington. Rush went on to question Washington’s military judgment, a step that he was to regret and one that clouded his reputation…

  • Continental Association (American colonial organization)

    United States: The Continental Congress: The Congress thus adopted an Association that committed the colonies to a carefully phased plan of economic pressure, beginning with nonimportation, moving to nonconsumption, and finishing the following September (after the rice harvest had been exported) with nonexportation. A few New England and Virginia delegates were looking toward independence, but…

  • Continental Can Company (American manufacturing company)

    Continental Group, Inc., American manufacturer and distributor of metal, paper, and plastic packaging products. The company also produces package-making equipment and owns paper mills and a life insurance company, the Virginia-based Richmond Company. It is headquartered in Stamford, Conn. The c

  • continental checkers (game)

    Polish checkers, board game, a variety of checkers (draughts) most played in continental Europe. The game is played on a board of 100 squares with 20 pieces on a side. The pieces move and capture as in checkers, except that in capturing they may move backward as well as forward. A piece is promoted

  • continental climate

    Köppen climate classification: Type C and D climates: Through a major portion of the middle and high latitudes (mostly from 25° to 70° N and S) lies a group of climates classified within the Köppen scheme as C and D types. Most of these regions lie beneath the upper-level, mid-latitude westerlies…

  • Continental Colours (historical United States flag)

    Grand Union Flag, American colonial banner first displayed by George Washington on Jan. 1, 1776. It showed the British Union Flag of 1606 in the canton. Its field consisted of seven red and six white alternated stripes representing the 13 colonies. The Stars and Stripes officially replaced it on

  • Continental Congress (American history)

    Continental Congress, in the period of the American Revolution, the body of delegates who spoke and acted collectively for the people of the colony-states that later became the United States of America. The term most specifically refers to the bodies that met in 1774 and 1775–81 and respectively

  • continental counselor (Bahāʾī Faith)

    Bahāʾī Faith: Organization: …Cause of God and the continental counselors. The members of the Hands of the Cause of God were appointed by Bahāʾ Allāh and Shoghi Effendi. The continental counselors are appointed by the Universal House of Justice. The primary functions of both groups are to propagate the Bahāʾī Faith and protect…

  • continental crust (geology)

    North America: General considerations: Continental crust is thicker, 22 miles (35 km) on average and less dense than oceanic crust, which accounts for its mean surface elevation of about 3 miles (4.8 km) above that of the ocean floor (Archimedes’ principle). Continental crust is more complex than oceanic crust…

  • Continental Divide (mountain ridge, North America)

    Continental Divide, fairly continuous ridge of north-south–trending mountain summits in western North America which divides the continent’s principal drainage into that flowing eastward (either to Hudson Bay in Canada or, chiefly, to the Mississippi and Rio Grande rivers in the United States) and

  • Continental Divide National Scenic Trail (path, United States)

    Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, primitive mountain footpath and equestrian trail in the western United States that, when complete, will extend from north to south some 3,100 miles (5,000 km), from the border of Canada to the border of Mexico, through a 100-mile- (160-km-) wide corridor

  • Continental Drift (novel by Banks)

    Russell Banks: …Book of Jamaica (1980) and Continental Drift (1985), the latter being generally considered his best work.

  • continental drift (geology)

    Continental drift, large-scale horizontal movements of continents relative to one another and to the ocean basins during one or more episodes of geologic time. This concept was an important precursor to the development of the theory of plate tectonics, which incorporates it. The idea of a

  • continental effect (meteorology)

    atmosphere: Effect of continents on air movement: As a result of the continental effect, the subtropical ridge is segmented into surface high-pressure cells. In the summer, large landmasses in the subtropics tend to be centres of relative low pressure as a result of strong solar heating. As a consequence, persistent high-pressure cells, such as the Bermuda and…

  • continental glacier (geology)

    glacier: The great ice sheets: Two great ice masses, the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, stand out in the world today and may be similar in many respects to the large Pleistocene ice sheets. About 99 percent of the world’s glacier ice is in these two ice masses,…

  • Continental Group, Inc. (American manufacturing company)

    Continental Group, Inc., American manufacturer and distributor of metal, paper, and plastic packaging products. The company also produces package-making equipment and owns paper mills and a life insurance company, the Virginia-based Richmond Company. It is headquartered in Stamford, Conn. The c

  • Continental Intercalary (rock stratum, Africa)

    Africa: Groundwater: … a rock stratum called the Continental Intercalary series, which dates from the early Cretaceous Period and which includes the Nubian sandstones of southern Egypt, is the most important water-bearing layer. It extends over very large areas and reaches a thickness of more than 3,000 feet; in Egypt and Algeria it…

  • continental island (geography)

    Pacific Islands: The continental islands, lying southwestward of the Andesite Line, are faulted and folded in mountainous arcs, tend to be higher and larger than those farther east, and have rich soils that support almost every kind of vegetation. Continental islands are generally larger (most notably, the Marianas,…

  • continental landform (geology)

    Continental landform, any conspicuous topographic feature on the largest land areas of the Earth. Familiar examples are mountains (including volcanic cones), plateaus, and valleys. (The term landform also can be applied to related features that occur on the floor of the Earth’s ocean basins, as,

  • continental margin (geology)

    Continental margin, the submarine edge of the continental crust distinguished by relatively light and isostatically high-floating material in comparison with the adjacent oceanic crust. It is the name for the collective area that encompasses the continental shelf, continental slope, and continental

  • Continental Morse Code (communications)

    Morse Code: …deficiency, a variant called the International Morse Code was devised by a conference of European nations in 1851. This newer code is also called Continental Morse Code.

  • Continental Navy (United States history)

    American Revolution: The status of naval forces at the outbreak of war: … authorized the creation of the Continental Navy and established the Marine Corps in November. The navy, taking its direction from the naval and marine committees of the Congress, was only occasionally effective. In 1776 it had 27 ships against Britain’s 270. By the end of the war, the British total…

  • continental nuclei (geology)

    Asia: Tectonic framework: …divided into two first-order classes: continental nuclei and orogenic (mountain-building) zones. The continental nuclei consist of platforms that stabilized mostly in Precambrian time (between roughly 4 billion and 541 million years ago) and have been covered largely by little-disturbed sedimentary rocks; included in that designation are the Angaran (or East

  • Continental Oil Company (American company)

    Conoco, former American petroleum company founded in 1875 as the Continental Oil and Transportation Company in Ogden, Utah. It became part of ConocoPhillips through a merger with the Phillips Petroleum Company in 2002. In 1885 it was reincorporated—with the new name, Continental Oil Company—as part

  • continental philosophy (European thought)

    Continental philosophy, series of Western philosophical schools and movements associated primarily with the countries of the western European continent, especially Germany and France. The term continental philosophy was adopted by professional philosophers in England after World War II to describe

  • continental plate (geology)

    metamorphic rock: Regional metamorphism: …of collision between oceanic and continental lithospheric plates such as the circum-Pacific region, the denser oceanic plate is subducted (carried into Earth’s mantle) beneath the more buoyant continental lithosphere (see plate tectonics). Rapid subduction of the cool oceanic lithosphere perturbs the thermal regime in such a way that high pressures…

  • continental platform (geology)

    Asia: Tectonic framework: The continental nuclei consist of platforms that stabilized mostly in Precambrian time (between roughly 4 billion and 541 million years ago) and have been covered largely by little-disturbed sedimentary rocks; included in that designation are the Angaran (or East Siberian), Indian, and Arabian platforms. There are also several smaller platforms…

  • continental Polar air mass (meteorology)

    Polar air mass, air mass that forms over land or water in the higher latitudes. See air mass;

  • continental Rationalism

    Western philosophy: The rationalism of Descartes: The dominant philosophy of the last half of the 17th century was that of René Descartes. A crucial figure in the history of philosophy, Descartes combined (however unconsciously or even unwillingly) the influences of the past into a synthesis that was striking…

  • continental rise (geology)

    Continental rise, a major depositional regime in oceans made up of thick sequences of continental material that accumulate between the continental slope and the abyssal plain. Continental rises form as a result of three sedimentary processes: mass wasting, the deposition from contour currents, and

  • continental shelf (geology)

    Continental shelf, a broad, relatively shallow submarine terrace of continental crust forming the edge of a continental landmass. The geology of continental shelves is often similar to that of the adjacent exposed portion of the continent, and most shelves have a gently rolling topography called

  • continental shield (geology)

    Continental shield, any of the large stable areas of low relief in the Earth’s crust that are composed of Precambrian crystalline rocks. The age of these rocks is in all cases greater than 540 million years, and radiometric age dating has revealed some that are as old as 2 to 3 billion years.

  • continental slope (geology)

    Continental slope, seaward border of the continental shelf. The world’s combined continental slope has a total length of approximately 300,000 km (200,000 miles) and descends at an average angle in excess of 4° from the shelf break at the edge of the continental shelf to the beginning of the ocean

  • continental stitch (needlepoint)

    needlepoint: …intersection of threads, and the tent stitch, which covers only one. Since the 16th century the most commonly used stitches have been the tent (or continental) stitch, the vertically worked Florentine stitch (also called the flame, bargello, or Hungarian stitch), and the cross-stitch. In the 20th century the basket weave,…

  • continental subarctic climate (meteorology)

    Continental subarctic climate, major climate type of the Köppen classification dominated by the winter season, a long, bitterly cold period with short, clear days, relatively little precipitation (mostly in the form of snow), and low humidity. It is located north of the humid continental climate,

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