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  • Campephaga (bird genus)

    cuckoo-shrike: In Campephaga, mainly an African genus, males are glossy black, females brownish and barred. An example is the 20-centimetre (8-inch) black cuckoo-shrike (C. phoenicea, including sulphurata), which has red- and yellow-shouldered races. African forms, sometimes separately classified as Lobotos, have bill wattles. The ground cuckoo-shrike (Pteropodocys…

  • campephagid (bird family)

    Campephagidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, including cuckoo-shrikes and minivets. The nearly 90 species, found from Africa to the Pacific Islands, are 13 to 35 cm (5 to 14 inches) in length and have slightly hooked bills, rather long tails, and fluffy plumage with loose, stiff feathers on

  • Campephagidae (bird family)

    Campephagidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, including cuckoo-shrikes and minivets. The nearly 90 species, found from Africa to the Pacific Islands, are 13 to 35 cm (5 to 14 inches) in length and have slightly hooked bills, rather long tails, and fluffy plumage with loose, stiff feathers on

  • Campephilus imperialis (bird)

    ivory-billed woodpecker: A related species, the imperial woodpecker (C. imperialis) of Mexico, is the largest woodpecker in the world. It is critically endangered and possibly extinct. All these birds appear to require large trees and isolation from disturbance.

  • Campephilus principalis (bird)

    Ivory-billed woodpecker, (Campephilus principalis), 45-cm (18-inch) black-and-white bird with a flaring crest (red in the male) and a long whitish bill. It belongs to the family Picidae (order Piciformes). The species was thought to be extinct, though there were unconfirmed sightings of the bird in

  • Campephilus principalis bairdii (bird)

    ivory-billed woodpecker: A subspecies, the Cuban ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis bairdii), was last officially sighted in the late 1980s and is believed to be extinct. A related species, the imperial woodpecker (C. imperialis) of Mexico, is the largest woodpecker in the world. It is critically endangered and possibly extinct. All…

  • Camperdown elm (plant)

    elm: Major species: glabra), with smoother bark; and Camperdown elm (U. glabra camperdownii), a variety of Wych elm also known as umbrella elm because of its drooping branches. The fast-growing Siberian elm (U. pumila), a brittle-twigged weak-wooded tree, is sometimes planted for quick shade and for windbreaks.

  • Campero, Narciso (president of Bolivia)

    Bolivia: Formation of Liberal and Conservative parties: …with the presidency (1880–84) of Narciso Campero, Bolivia moved into an era of civilian government. The country’s upper classes divided their support between two parties—Liberal and Conservative— and then proceeded to share power through them. This intraclass political party system finally brought Bolivia the stability it needed for economic development:…

  • Campers Handbook (book by Holding)

    camping: History: …wrote the first edition of The Camper’s Handbook in 1908. His urge to camp derived from his experiences as a boy: in 1853 he crossed the prairies of the United States in a wagon train, covering some 1,200 miles (1,900 km) with a company of 300. In 1877 he camped…

  • Campfire Girls (youth organization)

    camping: Youth camping: …Great Britain in 1910), the Camp Fire Boys and Girls (U.S., 1910), and the Girl Scouts (U.S., 1912; patterned after the Girl Guides). Most other organizations concerned with young people, such as the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA), the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), and many others, also undertook camp…

  • camphene (chemical compound)

    isoprenoid: Monoterpenes: fenchyl alcohol, and the hydrocarbon camphene.

  • camphor (chemical compound)

    Camphor, an organic compound of penetrating, somewhat musty aroma, used for many centuries as a component of incense and as a medicinal. Modern uses of camphor have been as a plasticizer for cellulose nitrate and as an insect repellent, particularly for moths. The molecular formula is C10H16O.

  • camphor glass (decorative arts)

    pattern glass: Some popular patterns, known as camphor glass, combined the use of clear glass with an acid-finished design.

  • camphor laurel (plant)

    camphor: camphor laurel, Cinnamomum camphora, common in China, Taiwan, and Japan. It is isolated by passing steam through the pulverized wood and condensing the vapours; camphor crystallizes from the oily portion of the distillate and is purified by pressing and sublimation. Since the early 1930s camphor…

  • camphor tree (plant)

    camphor: camphor laurel, Cinnamomum camphora, common in China, Taiwan, and Japan. It is isolated by passing steam through the pulverized wood and condensing the vapours; camphor crystallizes from the oily portion of the distillate and is purified by pressing and sublimation. Since the early 1930s camphor…

  • camphorated opium tincture (drug)

    Paregoric, preparation principally used in the treatment of diarrhea. Paregoric, which decreases movement of the stomach and intestinal muscles, is made from opium tincture (laudanum) or from powdered opium and includes anise oil, camphor, benzoic acid, glycerin, and diluted alcohol. The usual

  • camphorwood chest

    furniture: Chest: On later camphorwood chests the brass mounts are sunk flush with the surface of the wood, just as on portable writing desks and toilet cases of the French Empire period. Veneered wood was not suitable for chests intended for travel purposes, but it was possible to cover…

  • Camphuysen, Dirk Rafaëlszoon (Dutch writer)

    Dutch literature: Religious poetry: Ironically, Dirk Rafaëlszoon Camphuysen, removed from his parish because of his unorthodoxy, satisfied a widespread demand for personal, devotional poetry in Stichtelycke rymen (1624; “Edifying Poems”). Equally popular was the introspective mystical poetry by the ascetic Jan Luyken, a layman who began by writing hedonistic songs…

  • Campi, Antonio (Italian painter)

    Giulio Campi: …his brothers, Vincenzo (1536–91) and Antonio (1536–c. 1591); the latter was also a sculptor and historian of Cremona. Bernardino Campi (1522–c. 1592), unrelated to the family, was a pupil of Giulio and master of Elena and Sofonisba Anguissola.

  • Campi, Bernardino (Italian painter)

    Sofonisba Anguissola: …board in the household of Bernardino Campi, a prominent local painter. They remained under instruction with Campi for three years until he moved from Cremona to Milan. Sofonisba continued her training with Bernardino Gatti, through whom she gained an appreciation of the work of Correggio. During this period of her…

  • Campi, Giulio (Italian painter and architect)

    Giulio Campi, Italian painter and architect who led the formation of the Cremonese school. His work, and that of his followers, was elegant and eclectic. Campi was a prolific painter, working in both oil and fresco; at its best his work was distinguished by the richness of its colour. He first

  • Campian, Thomas (English poet and musician)

    Thomas Campion, English poet, composer, musical and literary theorist, physician, and one of the outstanding songwriters of the brilliant English lutenist school of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. His lyric poetry reflects his musical abilities in its subtle mastery of rhythmic and melodic

  • Campidanese (language)

    Sardinian language: Campidanese (Campidanian), centred on Cagliari in the south, was heavily influenced by Catalan and Italian. The northernmost varieties of Sardinian—Sassarese (Sassarian) in the northwest and Gallurese (Gallurian) in the northeast—exhibit a mixed Sardinian-Italian typology as a consequence of the encroachment of medieval Ligurian and Corsican influences.…

  • Campidanian (language)

    Sardinian language: Campidanese (Campidanian), centred on Cagliari in the south, was heavily influenced by Catalan and Italian. The northernmost varieties of Sardinian—Sassarese (Sassarian) in the northwest and Gallurese (Gallurian) in the northeast—exhibit a mixed Sardinian-Italian typology as a consequence of the encroachment of medieval Ligurian and Corsican influences.…

  • Campidano (plain, Italy)

    Campidano, narrow, low-lying plain, about 20 mi (32 km) wide, in southwestern Sardinia, Italy, extending inland about 70 mi (110 km) from the Golfo di (Gulf of) Oristano. It separates Sardinia’s small southwestern highland, Iglesiente, from the greater Eastern Highlands, which cover the entire

  • Campin, Robert (Flemish painter)

    Robert Campin, one of the earliest and greatest masters of Flemish painting. He has been identified with the Master of Flémalle on stylistic and other grounds. Characterized by a naturalistic conception of form and a poetic representation of the objects of daily life, Campin’s work marks a break

  • Câmpina (Romania)

    Prahova: The 19th-century Câmpina town is known for Haşdeu Castle, built in the shape of a cross, and for the house of Nicolae Grigorescu (1838–1907), the landscape and genre painter. Doftana has a prison where peasants were confined after the 1907 rebellion.

  • Campina Grande (Brazil)

    Campina Grande, city, eastern Paraíba estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It is situated in the Bacamarte Mountains at 1,804 feet (550 metres) above sea level. Located on the site of an Ariú Indian village, it was originally called Porta do Sertão (“Gateway to the Desert”). Made a village in 1766,

  • Campinas (Brazil)

    Campinas, city, eastern São Paulo estado (state), southeastern Brazil, located in the highlands near the Atibaia River at 2,274 feet (693 metres) above sea level. Formerly known as Nossa Senhora da Conceição de Campinas de Mato Grosso and as São Carlos, it was given town status and was made the

  • Campine, La (region, Belgium)

    Kempenland, plateau region of northeastern Belgium occupying most of Antwerp province and northern Limburg province. It is a rather dry, infertile region of sandy soil and gravel, with pine woods interspersed among meadows of thin grass and heather. Poor drainage, especially in the lower, western

  • Camping (American television series)

    Lena Dunham: …later created the HBO series Camping (2018), which was based on the British show of the same name. The comedy starred Jennifer Garner as an abrasive and controlling wife and mother who organizes a camping trip.

  • camping

    Camping, recreational activity in which participants take up temporary residence in the outdoors, usually using tents or specially designed or adapted vehicles for shelter. Camping was at one time only a rough, back-to-nature pastime for hardy open-air lovers, but it later became the standard

  • Camping Club of Canada (Canadian organization)

    camping: History: …and one in Canada (Canadian Federation of Camping and Caravanning).

  • Camping Club of Great Britain and Ireland (organization)

    camping: History: …other clubs to form the Camping Club of Great Britain and Ireland. Robert Falcon Scott, the famous Antarctic explorer, became the first president of the Camping Club in 1909.

  • campion (plant, genus Silene)

    Campion, common name for ornamental rock-garden or border plants constituting the genus Silene, of the pink, or carnation, family (Caryophyllaceae), consisting of about 720 species of herbaceous plants distributed throughout the world. Members of the genus Lychnis are included in Silene. Some

  • Campion, Albert (fictional character)

    Albert Campion, fictional English detective, the upper-class protagonist of a series of mystery novels beginning with The Crime at Black Dudley (1929; also published as The Black Dudley Murder) by Margery Allingham. In the early novels, Campion is almost a caricature of an indolent fop. His moneyed

  • Campion, Edith (premier of France)

    Edith Cresson, premier of France from May 15, 1991, to April 2, 1992, the first woman in French history to serve as premier. Daughter of a French civil servant, she studied at the School of Higher Commercial Studies, earning a doctorate in demography, and in 1959 married Jacques Cresson, an

  • Campion, Jane (New Zealand film director)

    Jane Campion, New Zealand director and screenwriter whose films often focused on women who are outsiders in society. Although both her parents were involved in New Zealand theatre, Campion initially chose a different direction, earning a B.A. (1975) in anthropology from the Victoria University of

  • Campion, Saint Edmund (English saint)

    Saint Edmund Campion, ; canonized Oct. 25, 1970; feast day October 25), English Jesuit martyred by the government of Queen Elizabeth I. The son of a London bookseller, Campion was teaching at Oxford University at the time of his ordination (1568) as a deacon in the Anglican church. But in a crisis

  • Campion, Thomas (English poet and musician)

    Thomas Campion, English poet, composer, musical and literary theorist, physician, and one of the outstanding songwriters of the brilliant English lutenist school of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. His lyric poetry reflects his musical abilities in its subtle mastery of rhythmic and melodic

  • Campo del Cielo craters (craters, Argentina)

    Campo del Cielo craters, group of small craters in the Gran Chaco region, near the hamlet of Campo del Cielo, north-central Argentina. These craters were attributed in 1933 to meteoritic origin. The largest crater is 250 feet (75 metres); its rim stands 3 feet (1 metre) above the surrounding land.

  • Campo di Marte (Italian periodical by Pratolini)

    Vasco Pratolini: …shut down Pratolini’s literary magazine, Campo di Marte, within nine months of its founding in 1939.

  • Campo Formio, Treaty of (France-Austria [1797])

    Treaty of Campo Formio, (Oct. 17, 1797), a peace settlement between France and Austria, signed at Campo Formio (now Campoformido, Italy), a village in Venezia Giulia southwest of Udine, following the defeat of Austria in Napoleon Bonaparte’s first Italian campaign. The treaty preserved most of the

  • Campo Grande (Brazil)

    Campo Grande, city, capital of Mato Grosso do Sul estado (state), southwestern Brazil. It lies near the headwaters of the Anhanduí River, in the Maracaju Mountains at 1,770 feet (540 metres) above sea level. Campo Grande is the largest city and the most active commercial centre of Mato Grosso do

  • Campo, Estanislao del (Argentine poet and journalist)

    Estanislao del Campo, Argentine poet and journalist whose Fausto is one of the major works of gaucho poetry. Campo descended from a patrician family and fought to defend Buenos Aires against General Justo José de Urquiza’s troops. He continued his military career while writing, and he rose to the

  • Campo, Piazza del (square, Siena, Italy)

    Siena: …large, shell-shaped square called the Piazza del Campo, which is the focus of Siena’s civic life. Tourists come to Siena in large numbers to view the Corsa del Palio, the famous horse races of medieval origin that are held twice annually on the Piazza del Campo amid colourful festivities. Standing…

  • Campoamor y Campoosorio, Ramón de (Spanish author)

    Ramón de Campoamor y Campoosorio, Spanish poet whose value lies in his expression of contemporary social attitudes. After studying Latin and philosophy, he went to Madrid, in 1838, to pursue a degree in medicine but turned to literature instead. Although his two early books, Ternezas y floras

  • Campobasso (Italy)

    Campobasso, city, capital of Molise regione (region), south-central Italy, northeast of Naples. The old town on a hill was abandoned in 1732 by its inhabitants, who built a new town on a lower fertile plain. The Castello Monforte (1459) with six towers of the medieval walls remains in the old town,

  • Campobello Island (island, New Brunswick, Canada)

    Campobello Island, second largest island (9 miles [14 km] long by 3 miles [5 km] wide), after Grand Manan, of a small island group at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay (an inlet of the Bay of Fundy), southwestern New Brunswick, southeastern Canada. Although politically Canadian and administered as

  • campodeid (arthropod)

    dipluran: Members of the family Campodeidae have two long slender abdominal cerci that are sensitive to vibrations.

  • Campodeidae (arthropod)

    dipluran: Members of the family Campodeidae have two long slender abdominal cerci that are sensitive to vibrations.

  • campodeiform larva (zoology)

    insect: Types of larvae: (caterpillar-like), scarabaeiform (grublike), campodeiform (elongated, flattened, and active), elateriform (wireworm-like), and vermiform (maggot-like). The three types of pupae are: obtect, with appendages more or less glued to the body; exarate, with the appendages free and not glued to the body; and coarctate, which is essentially exarate but remaining…

  • Campomanes, Florencio (Filipino chess administrator)

    Florencio Campomanes, Filipino chess administrator (born Feb. 22, 1927, Manila, Phil.—died May 3, 2010, Baguio City, Phil.), oversaw the expansion of the game of chess across the world in his role as president (1982–95) of the Fédération Internationale des Échecs (FIDE). He was widely denounced,

  • Camponotus (insect)

    ant: Carpenter ants (Camponotus) are large black ants common in North America that live in old logs and timbers. Some species live in trees or in the hollow stems of weeds. Tailor, or weaver, ants, found in the tropics of Africa (e.g., Tetramorium), make nests of…

  • Cámpora, Héctor J. (president of Argentina)

    Argentina: The return of Peronism: The newly elected president, Héctor J. Cámpora, took office in May 1973. It was immediately clear that he was merely preparing the way for the return of Perón from exile. Tensions rose sharply among Peronists as the organization’s left wing fought with its right-wing Montoneros for influence. At the…

  • Campos (Brazil)

    Campos dos Goytacazes, city, northeastern Rio de Janeiro estado (state), eastern Brazil. It is located 35 miles (56 km) up the Paraíba do Sul River from its mouth on the Atlantic coast of eastern Brazil, at 43 feet (13 metres) above sea level. One of the most important commercial cities of the

  • campos (grasslands, Brazil)

    Amazon River: Physiography of the river course: …and stunted arboreal cover (campos). Other tributaries of the Negro, such as the Vaupés and Guainía, drain eastward from the Colombian Oriente. The river traverses some of the least populous and least disturbed parts of the Amazon basin, including several national parks, national forests, and indigenous reserves. In its…

  • Campos de Castilla (work by Machado)

    Antonio Machado: …from pure introspection, and in Campos de Castilla (1912; “Plains of Castile”) he sought to capture the stark landscape and spirit of Castile in a severely denuded and sombre style. His later works, Nuevas canciones (1924; “New Songs”) and Poesías completas (1928; “Complete Poems”), express profound Existential views and reflect…

  • Campos dos Goitacazes (Brazil)

    Campos dos Goytacazes, city, northeastern Rio de Janeiro estado (state), eastern Brazil. It is located 35 miles (56 km) up the Paraíba do Sul River from its mouth on the Atlantic coast of eastern Brazil, at 43 feet (13 metres) above sea level. One of the most important commercial cities of the

  • Campos dos Goytacazes (Brazil)

    Campos dos Goytacazes, city, northeastern Rio de Janeiro estado (state), eastern Brazil. It is located 35 miles (56 km) up the Paraíba do Sul River from its mouth on the Atlantic coast of eastern Brazil, at 43 feet (13 metres) above sea level. One of the most important commercial cities of the

  • campos flicker (bird)

    flicker: The campos, or pampas, flicker (C. campestris) and the field flicker (C. campestroides)—sometimes considered to be a single species—are common in east-central South America; they are darker birds with yellow faces and breasts.

  • Campos, Álvaro de (Portuguese poet)

    Fernando Pessoa, one of the greatest Portuguese poets, whose Modernist work gave Portuguese literature European significance. From the age of seven Pessoa lived in Durban, S.Af., where his stepfather was Portuguese consul. He became a fluent reader and writer of English. With the hope of becoming a

  • Campos, Augusto de (Brazilian poet and critic)

    Campos, Haroldo de; and Campos, Augusto de: Haroldo and Augusto were also both known as translators; between them they translated into Portuguese works of Ezra Pound (1960), E.E. Cummings (1960), James Joyce (1962), Stéphane Mallarmé (1970), and Vladimir Mayakovsky (1967).

  • Campos, Eduardo (Brazilian politician)

    Dilma Rousseff: Presidency: …the Brazilian Socialist Party candidate, Eduardo Campos, died in a plane crash in August. He was replaced by his running mate, green activist Marina Silva, whose candidacy seemed to resonate strongly with the electorate. Moreover, with the October 5 election approaching, Brazil refused to join more than 150 other countries…

  • Campos, Haroldo de (Brazilian poet and critic)

    Haroldo Eurico Browne de Campos, Brazilian poet (born Aug. 19, 1929, São Paulo, Braz.—died Aug. 16, 2003, São Paulo), founded a modernist literary movement known for its concrete poetry. He and his compatriots called themselves Noigandres, a word he borrowed from an Ezra Pound canto. Besides s

  • Campos, Haroldo de; and Campos, Augusto de (Brazilian authors)

    Campos, Haroldo de; and Campos, Augusto de, poets and literary critics, best known as the prime movers in the creation of Brazilian concrete poetry in the 1950s. Together with the poets Décio Pignatari and Ferreira Gullar, the Campos brothers launched the first exposition of concrete poetry in 1956

  • Campos, Roberto de Oliveira (Brazilian politician)

    Roberto de Oliveira Campos, Brazilian politician and diplomat (born April 17, 1917, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso state, Braz.—died Oct. 9, 2001, Rio de Janeiro, Braz.), served in a number of capacities during his career, including ambassador to the U.S. and to the U.K., cabinet minister, and legislator. H

  • Campra, André (French composer)

    André Campra, one of the most important French composers of operas and sacred music of the early 18th century. Educated at Aix, Campra apparently became, at age 19, music master at Toulon Cathedral. He held similar posts at Arles in 1681 and Toulouse in 1683. In 1694 he became director of music at

  • Campsis (plant)

    Trumpet creeper, either of two species of ornamental vines of the genus Campsis (family Bignoniaceae, q.v.). Both are deciduous shrubs that climb by aerial rootlets. Campsis radicans, also called trumpet vine and cow itch, is a hardy climber native in eastern and southern United States; it

  • Campsis grandiflora (plant)

    trumpet creeper: The Chinese trumpet creeper (C. grandiflora) of eastern Asia is a poor climber but produces spectacular bunches of brilliant scarlet flowers.

  • Campsis radicans (plant)

    trumpet creeper: Campsis radicans, also called trumpet vine and cow itch, is a hardy climber native in eastern and southern United States; it produces terminal clusters of tubular, trumpet-shaped orange to orange-scarlet flowers (see photograph). The Chinese trumpet creeper (C. grandiflora) of eastern Asia is a poor climber but produces spectacular…

  • camptosaur (dinosaur)

    Camptosaurus, (genus Camptosaurus), large herbivorous dinosaurs found as fossils in western Europe and western North America that lived from the Late Jurassic Period (161.2 million to 145.5 million years ago) to the Early Cretaceous Period (145.5 million to 99.6 million years ago). Camptosaurus

  • Camptosaurus (dinosaur)

    Camptosaurus, (genus Camptosaurus), large herbivorous dinosaurs found as fossils in western Europe and western North America that lived from the Late Jurassic Period (161.2 million to 145.5 million years ago) to the Early Cretaceous Period (145.5 million to 99.6 million years ago). Camptosaurus

  • Camptostoma imberbe (bird)

    tyrannulet: …beardless tyrannulets of the genus Camptostoma. The northern form, C. imberbe, occurs north to Texas and Arizona (where it is called the beardless flycatcher), and the southern form, C. obsoletum, is found as far south as Argentina; their ranges meet in Costa Rica. The birds are called beardless for lack…

  • Camptostoma obsoletum (bird)

    tyrannulet: …flycatcher), and the southern form, C. obsoletum, is found as far south as Argentina; their ranges meet in Costa Rica. The birds are called beardless for lack of bristles at the corners of the mouth.

  • Camptown (New Jersey, United States)

    Irvington, township (town), Essex county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S., bordering Newark to the east. Settled in 1666 as part of a land grant from Sir George Carteret, proprietor of New Jersey, it was known as Camptown until 1852, when it separated from Clinton township and was renamed in honour

  • campū (literature)

    South Asian arts: Period of the Tamil Cōḷa Empire (10th–13th century): From the 10th century on, campū narratives (part prose, part verse) became popular both in Kannada and in Telugu, as did renderings of the Sanskrit epics Rāmāyaṇa and Mahābhārata and Jaina legends and biography.

  • Câmpulung (Romania)

    Câmpulung, town, Argeș județ (county), south-central Romania. It lies along the Târgului River at the foot of the Iezer and Păpușa mountains of the Transylvanian Alps. Originally it was a frontier post on a strategic road (now a highway) that crossed the Carpathians through Bran Pass in

  • campus

    garden and landscape design: Public design: Campus design begins when publicly accessible buildings grow into complexes of two or more, for religious, commercial, industrial, governmental, or educational use. Instead of or in addition to simple front-yard and backyard design, there are more complex systems of spaces between buildings, which vary from…

  • Campus Antiwar Network (American organization)

    Campus Antiwar Network (CAN), college- and university-based antiwar organization in the United States that was formed to protest the Iraq War (2003–11). During the lead-up to the Iraq War in late 2002 and early 2003, college and university students in the United States organized a series of

  • Campus Martius (field, Rome, Italy)

    Campus Martius, in ancient Rome, a floodplain of the Tiber River, the site of the altar of Mars and the temple of Apollo in the 5th century bc. Originally used primarily as a military exercise ground, it was later drained and, by the 1st century bc, became covered with large public buildings—baths,

  • Campus Vogladensis, Battle of (French history)

    Alaric II: …in the battle of the Campus Vogladensis (Vouillé, in Poitou).

  • Campus, The (work by Angell)

    Robert Cooley Angell: Among his many works are The Campus (1928), which studies the undergraduate life of American universities; A Study of Undergraduate Adjustment (1930); The Family Encounters the Depression (1936); The Integration of American Society (1941); The Moral Integration of American Cities (1951); Free Society and Moral Crisis

  • campylite (mineral)

    mimetite: Campylite is any member of the pyromorphite-mimetite series distinguished by distorted crystals with curved faces. For detailed physical properties, see arsenate mineral (table).

  • campylobacter (bacterium)

    Campylobacter, (genus Campylobacter), group of spiral-shaped bacteria that can cause human diseases such as campylobacter enteritis (campylobacteriosis), which begins abruptly with fever, headache, diarrhea, and significant abdominal pain. Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of

  • Campylobacter (bacterium)

    Campylobacter, (genus Campylobacter), group of spiral-shaped bacteria that can cause human diseases such as campylobacter enteritis (campylobacteriosis), which begins abruptly with fever, headache, diarrhea, and significant abdominal pain. Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of

  • campylobacter enteritis (pathology)

    Campylobacteriosis, a disease of cattle, sheep, and humans caused by bacteria of the genus Campylobacter. Vaccines are available against the disease in cattle and sheep. In humans, campylobacteriosis is the chief form of food poisoning. The disease is often contracted from contact with raw chicken.

  • Campylobacter jejuni (bacterium)

    nutritional disease: Foodborne illnesses: Campylobacter jejuni, found in raw or undercooked foods of animal origin, especially poultry, is responsible for more diarrheal illness throughout the world than any other bacterium. Travelers’ diarrhea is often caused by specific types of Escherichia coli bacteria, while other E. coli types cause much…

  • campylobacteriosis (pathology)

    Campylobacteriosis, a disease of cattle, sheep, and humans caused by bacteria of the genus Campylobacter. Vaccines are available against the disease in cattle and sheep. In humans, campylobacteriosis is the chief form of food poisoning. The disease is often contracted from contact with raw chicken.

  • Campyloramphys (bird)

    Scythebill, any of several birds of Central and South American tropical forests, belonging to the genus Campylorhamphus. The five species are woodcreepers (family Dendrocolaptidae, order Passeriformes), with long downcurved bills that are as much as one-third of the bird’s total length, which is

  • Campylorhamphus (bird)

    Scythebill, any of several birds of Central and South American tropical forests, belonging to the genus Campylorhamphus. The five species are woodcreepers (family Dendrocolaptidae, order Passeriformes), with long downcurved bills that are as much as one-third of the bird’s total length, which is

  • Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus (bird)

    wren: species is the 20-cm cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) of southwestern deserts; it is more common in Mexico. Tiny wood wrens (Henicorhina) are found in tropical forests and the little marsh wrens (Cistothorus, Telmatodytes) in tropical and temperate wetlands. Exceptional singers include the Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) of the eastern…

  • Camsay (China)

    Hangzhou, city and capital of Zhejiang sheng (province), China. The city is located in the northern part of the province on the north bank of the Qiantang River estuary at the head of Hangzhou Bay. It has water communications with the interior of Zhejiang to the south, is the southern terminus of

  • camshaft (engineering)

    Camshaft, in internal-combustion engines, rotating shaft with attached disks of irregular shape (the cams), which actuate the intake and exhaust valves of the cylinders. The cams and the camshaft are usually formed as a unit, with the cams set at angles so as to open and close the valves in a

  • Camú River (river, Dominican Republic)

    Camú River, river in north-central and northeastern Dominican Republic. Its headstreams rise in the Cordillera Central near La Vega. Other tributaries flow from the Cordillera Septentrional near Moca. The Camú, about 50 miles (80 km) long, flows generally eastward across the fertile La Vega Real

  • Camulodunum (England, United Kingdom)

    Colchester, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Essex, England. It occupies the northeastern part of the county on the River Colne. As Camulodunum, the town of Colchester was the capital of the pre-Roman Belgic ruler Cunobelinus and is so named on his coins. Although

  • Camunian art (Italian art)
  • Camus, Albert (French author)

    Albert Camus, French novelist, essayist, and playwright, best known for such novels as L’Étranger (1942; The Stranger), La Peste (1947; The Plague), and La Chute (1956; The Fall) and for his work in leftist causes. He received the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature. Less than a year after Camus was

  • Camus, Marcel (French director)

    Marcel Camus, French motion-picture director who won international acclaim for his second film, Orfeu Negro (Black Orpheus) in 1958. The film was praised for its use of exotic settings and brilliant spectacle and won first prize at both the Cannes and Venice film festivals as well as an Oscar from

  • Camuto, John Vincent (American footwear designer and fashion executive)

    Vince Camuto, (John Vincent Camuto), American footwear designer and fashion executive (born June 4, 1936, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 21, 2015, Greenwich, Conn.), was the visionary cofounder (1978, with Jerome [“Jack”] Fisher) of Nine West, which specialized in creating mid-priced women’s shoes; the

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