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  • computer simulation

    Computer simulation, the use of a computer to represent the dynamic responses of one system by the behaviour of another system modeled after it. A simulation uses a mathematical description, or model, of a real system in the form of a computer program. This model is composed of equations that

  • computer software

    Computer program, detailed plan or procedure for solving a problem with a computer; more specifically, an unambiguous, ordered sequence of computational instructions necessary to achieve such a solution. The distinction between computer programs and equipment is often made by referring to the

  • Computer Space (electronic game)

    electronic shooter game: …published by Nutting Associates as Computer Space (1971), the first mass-produced coin-operated electronic game, or arcade game. Bushnell and Dabney later founded Atari Inc., from which they released the first commercially successful arcade game, Pong (1972), an electronic sports game based on table tennis (Ping-Pong).

  • computer system

    Computer, device for processing, storing, and displaying information. Computer once meant a person who did computations, but now the term almost universally refers to automated electronic machinery. The first section of this article focuses on modern digital electronic computers and their design,

  • computer virus

    Computer virus, a portion of a program code that has been designed to furtively copy itself into other such codes or computer files. It is usually created by a prankster or vandal to effect a nonutilitarian result or to destroy data and program code. A virus consists of a set of instructions that

  • computer vision

    Computer vision, Field of robotics in which programs attempt to identify objects represented in digitized images provided by video cameras, thus enabling robots to “see.” Much work has been done on stereo vision as an aid to object identification and location within a three-dimensional field of

  • computer visualization

    computer: Scientific and engineering software: Scientific visualization software couples high-performance graphics with the output of equation solvers to yield vivid displays of models of physical systems. As with spreadsheets, visualization software lets an experimenter vary initial conditions or parameters. Observing the effect of such changes can help in improving models, as…

  • computer worm (computer program)

    Computer worm, computer program designed to furtively copy itself into other computers. Unlike a computer virus, which “infects” other programs in order to transmit itself to still more programs, worms are generally independent programs and need no “host.” In fact, worms typically need no human

  • computer-aided design

    analytic geometry: Projections: …20th century, computer animation and computer-aided design became ubiquitous. These applications are based on three-dimensional analytic geometry. Coordinates are used to determine the edges or parametric curves that form boundaries of the surfaces of virtual objects. Vector analysis is used to model lighting and determine realistic shadings of surfaces.

  • computer-aided engineering

    Computer-aided engineering (CAE), in industry, the integration of design and manufacturing into a system under the direct control of digital computers. CAE combines the use of computers in industrial-design work, computer-aided design (CAD), with their use in manufacturing operations,

  • computer-aided manufacturing

    automation: Computer-integrated manufacturing: Computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) involves the use of computer systems to assist in the planning, control, and management of production operations. This is accomplished by either direct or indirect connections between the computer and production operations. In the case of the direct connection, the computer is…

  • computer-aided software engineering (computer science)

    CASE, Use of computers in designing sophisticated tools to aid the software engineer and to automate the software development process as much as possible. It is particularly useful where major software products are designed by teams of engineers who may not share the same physical space. CASE tools

  • Computer-Assisted Dispatching System

    railroad: Interlocking and routing: …main lines are single-track, the Computer-Assisted Dispatching System (CADS) can relieve the operator of much routine work. At Union Pacific’s Omaha centre, once the dispatcher has entered a train’s identity and priority, the system automatically routes it accordingly, arranging its passing of other trains in loops as befits its priority.…

  • computer-assisted instruction

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI), a program of instructional material presented by means of a computer or computer systems. The use of computers in education started in the 1960s. With the advent of convenient microcomputers in the 1970s, computer use in schools has become widespread from

  • computer-assisted-dispatch system (police work)

    police: Computerization: Computer-assisted-dispatch (CAD) systems, such as the 911 system in the United States, are used not only to dispatch police quickly in an emergency but also to gather data on every person who has contact with the police. Information in the CAD database generally includes call…

  • computer-generated animation

    Computer animation, Form of animated graphics that has replaced “stop-motion” animation of scale-model puppets or drawings. Efforts to lessen the labour and costs of animation have led to simplification and computerization. Computers can be used in every step of sophisticated animation—for example,

  • Computer-Generated Film Characters Score at the Box Office

    In 2003 the final film of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Return of the King, further demonstrated what had been realized the year before in the second of the series, The Two Towers—how absolutely real a computer-generated (CG) character could seem. From the first appearance of the creature

  • computer-generated images

    Computer animation, Form of animated graphics that has replaced “stop-motion” animation of scale-model puppets or drawings. Efforts to lessen the labour and costs of animation have led to simplification and computerization. Computers can be used in every step of sophisticated animation—for example,

  • computer-integrated manufacturing

    Computer-integrated manufacturing, Data-driven automation that affects all systems or subsystems within a manufacturing environment: design and development, production (see CAD/CAM), marketing and sales, and field support and service. Basic manufacturing functions as well as materials-handling and

  • computer-mediated communication

    deindividuation: Computer-mediated communication: …action can be seen in computer-mediated communication (CMC—for example, Twitter, e-mail, blogs, social networking sites, or chat rooms. People can use CMC, unlike many other media, to communicate anonymously if they so wish. Just as traditional research on deindividuation predicts, CMC is often characterized by hostile negative interactions (known as…

  • computerized axial tomography

    Computed tomography (CT), diagnostic imaging method using a low-dose beam of X-rays that crosses the body in a single plane at many different angles. CT was conceived by William Oldendorf and developed independently by Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield and Allan MacLeod Cormack, who shared a 1979 Nobel

  • computerized cartography (cartography)

    GIS: …descendants are generally classified as computerized cartography, but they set the stage for GIS.

  • computerized speech (computer science)

    information processing: Speech analysis: Once so represented, speech can be subjected to the same techniques of content analysis as natural-language text—i.e., indexing and linguistic analysis. Converting speech elements into their alphanumeric counterparts is an intriguing problem because the “shape” of speech sounds embodies a wide range of many acoustic characteristics and because…

  • computerized tomographic imaging

    Computed tomography (CT), diagnostic imaging method using a low-dose beam of X-rays that crosses the body in a single plane at many different angles. CT was conceived by William Oldendorf and developed independently by Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield and Allan MacLeod Cormack, who shared a 1979 Nobel

  • computerized tomographic scanning

    Computed tomography (CT), diagnostic imaging method using a low-dose beam of X-rays that crosses the body in a single plane at many different angles. CT was conceived by William Oldendorf and developed independently by Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield and Allan MacLeod Cormack, who shared a 1979 Nobel

  • computerized tomography

    Computed tomography (CT), diagnostic imaging method using a low-dose beam of X-rays that crosses the body in a single plane at many different angles. CT was conceived by William Oldendorf and developed independently by Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield and Allan MacLeod Cormack, who shared a 1979 Nobel

  • computerized typesetting

    Computerized typesetting, method of typesetting in which characters are generated by computer and transferred to light-sensitive paper or film by means of either pulses from a laser beam or moving rays of light from a stroboscopic source or a cathode-ray tube (CRT). The system includes a keyboard

  • Computing Machinery, Association for (international organization)

    Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), international organization for computer science and information technology professionals and, since 1960, institutions associated with the field. Since 1966 ACM has annually presented one or more individuals with the A.M. Turing Award, the most prestigious

  • Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (American corporation)

    IBM, leading American computer manufacturer, with a major share of the market both in the United States and abroad. Its headquarters are in Armonk, New York. It was incorporated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company in a consolidation of three smaller companies that made punch-card

  • computus (Christian calendar)

    mathematics: European mathematics during the Middle Ages and Renaissance: …the date of Easter, the computus, that was based on the lunar cycle of 19 solar years (i.e., 235 lunar revolutions) and the 28-year solar cycle. Between the time of Bede (died 735), when the system was fully developed, and about 1500, the computus was reduced to a series of…

  • Comrade Chinx (Zimbabwean musician)

    chimurenga: …most notably Oliver Mtukudzi and Comrade Chinx (Dickson Chingaira), began performing their own versions of chimurenga. Mtukudzi enriched his sound with elements of reggae, jazz, mbira, and various African popular musics, including Rhodesian jit and South African mbaqanga, both of which featured quick-paced rippling melodies of electric guitars. His song…

  • Comrade, The (work by Pavese)

    Cesare Pavese: …the novella Il compagno (1947; The Comrade, 1959). His first volume of lyric poetry, Lavorare stanca (1936; Hard Labor, 1976), followed his release from prison. An initial novella, Paesi tuoi (1941; The Harvesters, 1961), recalled, as many of his works do, the sacred places of childhood. Between 1943 and 1945…

  • Comradeship (film by Pabst)

    G.W. Pabst: …Threepenny Opera), and Kameradschaft (1931; Comradeship), in which the virtues of international cooperation are extolled via a mine disaster met by the combined rescue efforts of French and German workers.

  • Comsat (American corporation)

    Comsat, private corporation authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1962 to develop commercial communications satellite systems. It was officially incorporated in 1963, with 50 percent of the stock being sold to the public and the balance to private communications companies. Agencies from 17 other

  • Comsat Video Enterprises, Inc. (American corporation)

    Comsat: Comsat Video Enterprises, Inc., an unregulated subsidiary, provides entertainment and videoconferencing services to hotels in the United States. Comsat’s other unregulated business activities include selling communications systems and network services to the federal government and to private companies.

  • Comstock Act (United States [1873])

    Comstock Act, federal statute passed by the U.S. Congress in 1873 as an “Act of the Suppression of Trade in, and Circulation of, Obscene Literature and Articles of Immoral Use.” Named for Anthony Comstock, a zealous crusader against what he considered to be obscenity, the act criminalized

  • Comstock Law (United States [1873])

    Comstock Act, federal statute passed by the U.S. Congress in 1873 as an “Act of the Suppression of Trade in, and Circulation of, Obscene Literature and Articles of Immoral Use.” Named for Anthony Comstock, a zealous crusader against what he considered to be obscenity, the act criminalized

  • Comstock Lode (mineral deposit, Nevada, United States)

    Comstock Lode, rich deposit of silver in Nevada, U.S., named for Henry Comstock, part-owner of the property on which it was discovered in June 1859. Virginia City, Washoe, and other mining “boomtowns” quickly arose in the vicinity, and in 10 years the lode’s output justified establishment of a

  • Comstock, Anna Botsford (American illustrator and writer)

    Anna Botsford Comstock, American illustrator, writer, and educator remembered for her work in nature study. Anna Botsford entered Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, in 1874, but she left after two years. In 1878 she married John Henry Comstock, a young entomologist on the Cornell faculty who

  • Comstock, Anthony (American social reformer)

    Anthony Comstock, one of the most powerful American reformers, who for more than 40 years led a crusade against what he considered obscenity in literature and in other forms of expression. The epithet “comstockery” came to be synonymous with moralistic censorship. A Union Army veteran of the

  • Comstock, Cyrus B. (Union army officer and engineer)

    Cyrus B. Comstock, Union army officer and engineer who commanded the Balloon Corps during the American Civil War and later founded the Comstock Prize in Physics. Comstock was educated in the local public schools and at an academy in Scituate, Rhode Island. He was especially interested in surveying,

  • Comstock, Cyrus Ballou (Union army officer and engineer)

    Cyrus B. Comstock, Union army officer and engineer who commanded the Balloon Corps during the American Civil War and later founded the Comstock Prize in Physics. Comstock was educated in the local public schools and at an academy in Scituate, Rhode Island. He was especially interested in surveying,

  • Comstock, Elizabeth Leslie Rous (Anglo-American minister and social reformer)

    Elizabeth Leslie Rous Comstock, Anglo-American Quaker minister and social reformer, an articulate abolitionist and an influential worker for social welfare who helped adjust the perspective of the Society of Friends to the changes wrought by the urban-industrial age. Elizabeth Rous was educated in

  • Comstock, George Willis (American epidemiologist)

    George Willis Comstock, American epidemiologist (born Jan. 7, 1915, Niagara Falls, N.Y.—died July 15, 2007, Smithsburg, Md.), conducted research in the 1940s and ’50s for the U.S. Public Health Service to demonstrate the efficacy of vaccines that were used to treat tuberculosis (TB). After studying

  • Comstock, John Henry (American entomologist)

    John Henry Comstock, pioneering American educator and researcher in entomology; his studies of scale insects and butterflies and moths provided the basis for systematic classification of these insects. Comstock was educated at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., and at Yale University. He later

  • Comstock-Needham system (zoology)

    lepidopteran: Thorax: …designated according to the modified Comstock-Needham system. The names of the veins (with their symbols in parentheses) and the usual number of branches of each (subscript designations) are as follows, in progression from the costal margin of the wing to the anal margin:

  • COMT (enzyme)

    antiparkinson drug: COMT and MAO-B inhibitors: COMT inhibitors, such as tolcapone and entacapone, block the enzymatic breakdown of dopamine by the catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme. These drugs commonly are given in conjunction with the combination of levodopa and carbidopa, since they inhibit COMT degradation of levodopa in peripheral tissues, thereby increasing levodopa’s half-life…

  • COMT inhibitor (drug)

    antiparkinson drug: COMT and MAO-B inhibitors: COMT inhibitors, such as tolcapone and entacapone, block the enzymatic breakdown of dopamine by the catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme. These drugs commonly are given in conjunction with the combination of levodopa and carbidopa, since they inhibit COMT degradation of levodopa in peripheral tissues,…

  • Comtat (former province, France)

    Comtat-Venaissin, former province of France and papal enclave, bounded on the north and northeast by Dauphiné, on the south by the Durance River, on the east by Provence, and on the west by the Rhône River. It comprises the present département of Vaucluse. Its capital was Carpentras.

  • Comtat-Venaissin (former province, France)

    Comtat-Venaissin, former province of France and papal enclave, bounded on the north and northeast by Dauphiné, on the south by the Durance River, on the east by Provence, and on the west by the Rhône River. It comprises the present département of Vaucluse. Its capital was Carpentras.

  • Comte de Monte-Cristo, Le (novel by Dumas)

    The Count of Monte Cristo, Romantic novel by French author Alexandre Dumas père (possibly in collaboration with Auguste Maquet), published serially in 1844–46 and in book form in 1844–45. The work, which is set during the time of the Bourbon Restoration in France, tells the story of an unjustly

  • Comte Ory, Le (opera by Rossini)

    Gioachino Rossini: Parisian period: …and Le Comte Ory (Count Ory, 1828), an adaptation of opera buffa style to French opera.

  • Comte, Auguste (French philosopher)

    Auguste Comte, French philosopher known as the founder of sociology and of positivism. Comte gave the science of sociology its name and established the new subject in a systematic fashion. Comte’s father, Louis Comte, a tax official, and his mother, Rosalie Boyer, were strongly royalist and deeply

  • Comte, Isidore-Auguste-Marie-François-Xavier (French philosopher)

    Auguste Comte, French philosopher known as the founder of sociology and of positivism. Comte gave the science of sociology its name and established the new subject in a systematic fashion. Comte’s father, Louis Comte, a tax official, and his mother, Rosalie Boyer, were strongly royalist and deeply

  • Comum (Italy)

    Como, city, Lombardia regione (region), northern Italy, rimmed by mountains at the extreme southwest end of Lake Como, north of Milan. As the ancient Comum, perhaps of Gallic origin, it was conquered by the Romans in 196 bc and became a Roman colony under Julius Caesar. It was made a bishopric in

  • Comunale, Villa (park, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: Layout and architecture: …the long, public park called Villa Comunale, sheltering the Zoological Station and the Aquarium (the oldest in Europe), both founded in 1872. Along the inland border of the park runs the Riviera di Chiaia, marking what was once the shoreline. (The name Chiaia probably derives from ghiaia, denoting a shingle.)…

  • comunero movement (Spanish history)

    Spain: The comunero movement: On June 28, 1519, Charles was elected Holy Roman emperor as Charles V and prepared to go to Germany. His chancellor, Mercurino Gattinara, summoned the Castilian Cortes to Santiago in northwestern Spain (April 1520) to demand more money, even though the former grant…

  • Comunero Rebellion (Colombian history)

    Comunero Rebellion, popular uprising in 1780–81 in the Viceroyalty of New Granada. In response to new tobacco and polling taxes imposed in 1780 by the Spanish government, insurgents led by Manuela Beltrán in Socorro, Colombia, sparked a revolt that soon spread to neighbouring towns north of Bogotá.

  • Comunero Revolt (Colombian history)

    Comunero Rebellion, popular uprising in 1780–81 in the Viceroyalty of New Granada. In response to new tobacco and polling taxes imposed in 1780 by the Spanish government, insurgents led by Manuela Beltrán in Socorro, Colombia, sparked a revolt that soon spread to neighbouring towns north of Bogotá.

  • Comuneros, Insurrección de los (Colombian history)

    Comunero Rebellion, popular uprising in 1780–81 in the Viceroyalty of New Granada. In response to new tobacco and polling taxes imposed in 1780 by the Spanish government, insurgents led by Manuela Beltrán in Socorro, Colombia, sparked a revolt that soon spread to neighbouring towns north of Bogotá.

  • comunidad (political unit)

    Aymara: The political unit is the ayllu, or comunidad, composed of several extended families. It has little resemblance to the aboriginal ayllu.

  • Comunidad Andina (South American organization)

    Andean Community, South American organization founded to encourage industrial, agricultural, social, and trade cooperation. Formed in 1969 by the Cartagena Agreement, the group originally consisted of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile; Venezuela joined in 1973 but withdrew in 2006, and

  • Comunidad Foral de Navarra (autonomous area, Spain)

    Navarra, comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of northern Spain, officially known as the Comunidad Foral de Navarra (“Regional Community of Navarra”). It is roughly coextensive with the Spanish portion of the historical kingdom of Navarra and coextensive with the modern provincia (province) of

  • Comunidad Valenciana (autonomous area, Spain)

    Valencia, comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of eastern Spain. It encompasses the provincias (provinces) of Castellón, Valencia, and Alicante. The autonomous community occupies a long and narrow area aligned on a rough north-south axis along the Mediterranean Sea, which lies to the east. It

  • Comus (work by Milton)

    Comus, masque by John Milton, presented on Sept. 29, 1634, before John Egerton, earl of Bridgewater, at Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, and published anonymously in 1637. Milton wrote the text in honour of the earl becoming lord president of Wales and the Marches at the suggestion of the composer

  • Comyn, John (Scottish leader)

    Robert the Bruce: Background and early life: Comyn, a nephew of John de Balliol, was a possible rival for the crown, and Bruce’s actions suggest that he had already decided to seize the throne. He hastened to Scone and was crowned on March 25.

  • Con Bacach (Irish leader)

    Conn O’Neill, 1st earl of Tyrone, the first of the O’Neills to emerge as leaders of the native Irish as a result of England’s attempts to subjugate the country in the 16th century. Conn, who was related through his mother to the Earl of Kildare (Fitzgerald), became chief of the Tyrone branch of the

  • Con Dao (Vietnam)

    Con Son, town, island, and island group, southern Vietnam. The island group consists of 13 volcanic islands and islets about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of the Ca Mau Peninsula in the South China Sea. Con Son Island, which is 13 miles (21 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide, is well wooded and has an

  • con game (swindling operation)

    Confidence game, any elaborate swindling operation in which advantage is taken of the confidence the victim reposes in the swindler. Some countries have created a statutory offense of this name, though the elements of the crime have never been clearly defined by legislation, and the scope of

  • Con gli occhi chiusi (work by Tozzi)

    Italian literature: The veristi and other narrative writers: …Sienese writer Federigo Tozzi, including Con gli occhi chiusi (1919; “With Closed Eyes”) and Tre croci (1920; Three Crosses). Tozzi, however, belongs psychologically and stylistically to the 20th century.

  • Con Poco Coco (recording by Valdés)

    Latin jazz: Valdés’s “Con Poco Coco,” released in 1952, became the first spontaneously improvised Afro-Cuban jam session known to have been recorded.

  • Con Son (Vietnam)

    Con Son, town, island, and island group, southern Vietnam. The island group consists of 13 volcanic islands and islets about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of the Ca Mau Peninsula in the South China Sea. Con Son Island, which is 13 miles (21 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide, is well wooded and has an

  • Con Son Island (island, Vietnam)

    Con Son: Con Son Island, which is 13 miles (21 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide, is well wooded and has an indented coast. It has also been known as Penitentiary Island because it was used for political prisoners.

  • Con Son Islands (island group, Vietnam)

    Con Son: The island group consists of 13 volcanic islands and islets about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of the Ca Mau Peninsula in the South China Sea. Con Son Island, which is 13 miles (21 km) long and 5 miles (8 km) wide, is well wooded and…

  • Con Yu (Myanmar religious leader)

    Telakhon: …in the mid-19th century by Con Yu. It banned traditional animal sacrifice, practiced a strict ethic, and maintained Karen culture. In 1962–65 the cult’s seventh successive head, the Phu Chaik (“Elder of the Faith”), was presented with vernacular Bibles by American missionaries. Expectations rose on both sides and membership (mostly…

  • Conable, Barber Benjamin, Jr. (American politician)

    Barber Benjamin Conable, Jr., American politician (born Nov. 2, 1922, Warsaw, N.Y.—died Nov. 30, 2003, Sarasota, Fla.), served as a Republican congressman in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1965 to 1985 and in 1986 was appointed president of the International Bank for Reconstruction and D

  • Conacher, Charlie (Canadian ice-hockey player)

    Toronto Maple Leafs: …Hockey Hall of Fame members—Charlie Conacher, Busher Jackson, and Joe Primeau—all under age 26.

  • Conacher, Lionel (Canadian athlete)

    Lionel Conacher, athlete and politician who was voted Canada’s Athlete of the Half Century (1900–50) and was a Liberal Party member of Parliament. Conacher dropped out of school after the eighth grade to work. His athletic career stemmed from a prize he won in 1916 for selling the most newspapers—a

  • Conacher, Lionel Pretoria (Canadian athlete)

    Lionel Conacher, athlete and politician who was voted Canada’s Athlete of the Half Century (1900–50) and was a Liberal Party member of Parliament. Conacher dropped out of school after the eighth grade to work. His athletic career stemmed from a prize he won in 1916 for selling the most newspapers—a

  • Conaill, Daithi O (Irish political activist)

    David O’Connell, Irish political activist and a cofounder of the Provisional (“Provo”) wing of the Irish Republican Army (IRA). O’Connell, who later became a teacher, joined the IRA at the age of 17. He quickly became a well-known militant, and over a period of more than 20 years he was repeatedly

  • Conakat (political party, Congo)

    Moise Tshombe: …1959 he became president of Conakat (Confédération des Associations Tribales du Katanga), a political party that was supported by Tshombe’s ethnic group, the powerful Lunda, and by the Belgian mining monopoly Union Minière du Haut Katanga, which controlled the province’s rich copper mines. At a conference called by the Belgian…

  • Conakry (national capital, Guinea)

    Conakry, national capital, largest city, and chief Atlantic port, western Guinea. Conakry lies on Tombo (Tumbo) Island and the Camayenne (Kaloum) Peninsula. Founded by the French in 1884, it derived its name from a local village inhabited by the Susu (Soussou) people. Subsequently it became capital

  • Conall (Irish ruler)

    Donegal: …name was Tyrconnell (“Land of Conall”). Conall, with his brother Eoghan, conquered northwestern Ulster in approximately 400 ce and founded the kingdom of Ailech; its capital was at the concentric stone fortress known as the Grianan of Ailech on a hill west of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Eoghan took Tyrone and…

  • Conan (American television show)

    Conan O'Brien: …The Tonight Show (2009–10), and Conan (2010– ).

  • Conan Doyle, Arthur (British author)

    Arthur Conan Doyle, Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. Conan Doyle, the second of Charles Altamont and Mary Foley Doyle’s 10 children, began seven years of Jesuit education in Lancashire,

  • Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Ignatius (British author)

    Arthur Conan Doyle, Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction. Conan Doyle, the second of Charles Altamont and Mary Foley Doyle’s 10 children, began seven years of Jesuit education in Lancashire,

  • Conan the Barbarian (film by Milius [1982])

    James Earl Jones: …ruler in the fantasy film Conan the Barbarian (1982), a coal miner fighting for the right to form a union in John Sayles’s Matewan (1987), and an African king who lets his son (played by Eddie Murphy) travel to the United States in the comedy Coming to America (1988). He…

  • Conan the Barbarian (fictional character)

    Conan the Barbarian, fictional hero of pulp novels, comic books, and films whose fantasy adventures take place in a prehistoric past. Conan is an adventurer-warrior from Cimmeria who lives in the Hyborian age, an era that supposedly follows the disappearance of the mythical continent of Atlantis.

  • Conan the Destroyer (film by Fleischer [1984])

    Richard Fleischer: Later work: …moved to action adventures with Conan the Destroyer (1984), a sequel to the surprise 1982 hit Conan the Barbarian; Arnold Schwarzenegger returned as the titular hero, with Grace Jones and Wilt Chamberlain in supporting roles. It was popular with moviegoers, and Fleischer directed the spin-off Red Sonja (1985). His final…

  • Conan, Laure (Canadian author)

    Canadian literature: The literary movement of 1860: …and Quebec’s first woman novelist, Laure Conan (the pen name of Marie-Louise-Félicité Angers), published a sophisticated psychological novel, Angéline de Montbrun (1881–82; Eng. trans. Angéline de Montbrun).

  • Conant, James B. (American educator and scientist)

    James B. Conant, American educator and scientist, president of Harvard University, and U.S. high commissioner for western Germany following World War II. Conant received A.B. and Ph.D. (1916) degrees from Harvard and, after spending a year in the research division of the chemical warfare service

  • Conant, James Bryant (American educator and scientist)

    James B. Conant, American educator and scientist, president of Harvard University, and U.S. high commissioner for western Germany following World War II. Conant received A.B. and Ph.D. (1916) degrees from Harvard and, after spending a year in the research division of the chemical warfare service

  • Conant, Roger (American colonial leader)

    John Endecott: …Plymouth who were led by Roger Conant. According to tradition, the establishment of good relations between the two groups prompted the change of the name of the settlement to Salem (from the Hebrew word shalom, “peace”). When the jurisdiction of the New England Company was supplanted by that of the…

  • conarium (anatomy)

    Pineal gland, endocrine gland found in vertebrates that is the source of melatonin, a hormone derived from tryptophan that plays a central role in the regulation of circadian rhythm (the roughly 24-hour cycle of biological activities associated with natural periods of light and darkness). The

  • Conboy, Sara Agnes McLaughlin (American labour leader)

    Sara Agnes McLaughlin Conboy, labour leader, one of the first women to achieve a position of influence in the highest levels of American organized labour. Sara McLaughlin went to work in a candy factory at age 11. Over the next several years she worked in a button factory and then in various carpet

  • Conca del Fucino (former lake bed, Italy)

    Fucino Basin, former lake bed in L’Aquila province, Abruzzi region, central Italy, just east of Avezzano. The lake was once 37 mi (59 km) in circumference and about 100 ft (30 m) deep, although its level was subject to great variations because of the lack of an outlet. As early as ad 52 the

  • Conca, Sebastiano (Italian painter)

    Sebastiano Conca, late Neapolitan Baroque painter who created great, animated compositions, superficial in content but dazzling in colour and in execution. Conca studied in Naples under Francesco Solimena. In 1706, along with his brother Giovanni, who acted as his assistant, he settled in Rome. He

  • CONCACAF (sports organization)

    football: International organization: The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) followed four years later. The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) appeared in 1966. These confederations may organize their own club, international, and youth tournaments, elect representatives to FIFA’s Executive Committee, and promote football in their specific…

  • concave diffraction grating (instrument)

    diffraction grating: …further classified as plane or concave, the latter being a spherical surface ruled with lines that are the projection of equidistant and parallel lines on an imaginary plane surface. The advantage of a concave grating over a plane grating is its ability to produce sharp spectral lines without the aid…

  • concave mirror eye (anatomy)

    photoreception: Concave mirror eyes: Scallops (Pecten) have about 50–100 single-chambered eyes in which the image is formed not by a lens but by a concave mirror. In 1965 British neurobiologist Michael F. Land (the author of this article) found that although scallop eyes have a lens,…

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