• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Columbus, Ferdinand (Spanish bibliographer and cosmographer)

    Christopher Columbus: Written sources: …attributed to Columbus’s younger son, Ferdinand, who traveled with the admiral. Further light is thrown upon the explorations by the so-called Pleitos de Colón, judicial documents concerning Columbus’s disputed legacy. A more recent discovery is a copybook that purportedly contains five narrative letters and two personal ones from Columbus, all…

  • Columbus, Luis (Spanish government official)

    Diego Columbus: His son Luis was to receive the title admiral of the Indies but would renounce all other rights in return for a perpetual annuity of 10,000 ducats, the island of Jamaica in fief, and an estate of 25 square leagues on the Isthmus of Panama with the…

  • Columbus, Samuel (Swedish author)

    Swedish literature: The 17th century: …followers included the two brothers Columbus, one of whom, Samuel, wrote Odae sueticae (1674; “Swedish Odes”) as well as a collection of anecdotes that illumine Stiernhielm’s character. A rival to Stiernhielm was the unidentified Skogekär Bärgbo (a pseudonym), whose Wenerid (1680) was the first sonnet cycle in Swedish.

  • Columcille, Saint (Christian missionary)

    St. Columba, ; feast day June 9), abbot and missionary traditionally credited with the main role in the conversion of Scotland to Christianity. Columba studied under Saints Finnian of Moville and Finnian of Clonard and was ordained priest about 551. He founded churches and the famous monasteries

  • columella (shell structure)

    gastropod: The shell: …a central axis called the columella. Generally, the coils, or whorls, added later in life are larger than those added when the snail is young. At the end of the last whorl is the aperture, or opening. The shell is secreted along the outer lip of the aperture by the…

  • columella (bryophyte)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: …mouth and influencing spore release; columella usually present, encircled or overarched by a spore-bearing layer; calyptra capping apex of elongating seta and influencing survival and differentiation of sporangium; spores generally shed over extended period; seta a rigid structure with internal conducting strand and holding sporangium well above gametophore in most…

  • columella (anatomy)

    amphibian: Common features: …unique to lissamphibians is the columella-opercular complex, a pair of elements associated with the auditory capsule that transmit airborne (columella) or seismic (operculum) signals.

  • Columella, Lucius Junius Moderatus (Roman author)

    Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella, Roman soldier and farmer who wrote extensively on agriculture and kindred subjects in the hope of arousing a love for farming and a simple life. He became in early life a tribune of the legion stationed in Syria, but neither an army career nor the law attracted

  • columellar muscle (anatomy)

    muscle: Mollusks: The columellar (shell) muscles of gastropods pull the foot and other parts of the body into the shell. The adductor muscles of bivalves (Figure 4) shorten to close the shell or relax to allow the shell to spring open, enabling the mollusk to extend its foot…

  • column (snowflake)

    climate: Snow and sleet: of snow crystals: plates, stellars, columns, needles, spatial dendrites, capped columns, and irregular crystals. The size and shape of the snow crystals depend mainly on the temperature of their formation and on the amount of water vapour that is available for deposition. The two principal influences are not independent; the…

  • column (architecture)

    Column, in architecture, a vertical element, usually a rounded shaft with a capital and a base, which in most cases serves as a support. A column may also be nonstructural, used for a decorative purpose or as a freestanding monument. In the field of architectural design a column is used for

  • column chromatography (chemistry)

    Column chromatography, in analytical chemistry, method for separating mixtures of substances in which a liquid or gaseous solution of the mixture is caused to flow through a tube packed with a finely divided solid, which may be coated with an adsorbent liquid, or through a long capillary tube

  • column krater (pottery)

    krater: …of a flower; and the column krater, with columnar handles rising from the shoulder to a flat, projecting lip rim.

  • column Ladik (carpet)

    Ladik carpet: The term column Ladik has been applied to prayer rugs that, regardless of their actual places of origin, share a motif derived from a 16th-century Ottoman court design, consisting of three arches of unequal height supported upon slender columns and surmounted by a panel as described earlier.…

  • Columna Rostrata (monument, Rome, Italy)

    Gaius Duilius: Called the columna rostrata, it was a favourite site for speeches. The English term rostrum derives from this Roman custom. In 258 Duilius was censor (magistrate responsible for the census and for public morality), and in 231 he was empowered (as a magistrate with emergency powers, or…

  • Columna, La (mountain, Venezuela)

    Bolívar Peak, mountain in Sierra Nevada National Park, northwestern Venezuela. Rising 16,332 feet (4,978 metres), it is the highest mountain in the Cordillera de Mérida (a northeastern spur of the Andes Mountains) and in

  • columnar branching (plant anatomy)

    tree: The anatomy and organization of wood: …the third major tree form, columnar, in which the central axis develops without branching until the apex of the bole.

  • columnar epithelium (anatomy)

    epithelium: Columnar epithelium covers the intestinal tract from the end of the esophagus to the beginning of the rectum. It also lines the ducts of many glands. A typical form covers the villi (nipple-like projections) of the small intestine. Cubical epithelium is found in many glands…

  • columnar ice

    ice in lakes and rivers: Variations in ice structure: …single crystals and is termed columnar ice. When a very thin section of the ice is cut and examined with light through crossed polaroid sheets, the crystal structure is clearly seen.

  • columnar jointing (geology)

    igneous rock: Fractures: The columnar jointing found in many mafic volcanic rocks is a typical result of contraction upon cooling.

  • columnist (journalism)

    Columnist, the author or editor of a regular signed contribution to a newspaper, magazine, or Web site, usually under a permanent title and devoted to comment on some aspect of the contemporary scene. The column may be humorous or serious, on one subject or on life in general, frivolous in tone or

  • Columns Group (archaeology)

    Mitla: …structures—Grupo de las Columnas (Columns Group), Grupo de las Iglesias (Churches Group), Grupo del Arroyo (Arroyo Group), Grupo de los Adobes (Adobe Group), and Grupo del Sur (Southern Group)—of which only the first two had been fully excavated and restored by the early 1980s. Each group has several rectangular…

  • Colva (India)

    Madgaon: …city is not far from Colva, considered to have one of India’s most-beautiful beaches. Pop. (2001) town, 78,382; urban agglom., 94,383; (2011) city, 87,650; urban agglom., 106,484.

  • Colville River (river, Alaska, United States)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the northern ranges: …east-flowing upper portion of the Colville River, most drainage is northward. The tundra-covered area, called the North Slope, is underlain by permafrost, which is permanently frozen sediment and rock; only a shallow surface zone thaws during the short summer, producing a vast number of small ephemeral lakes and ponds. That…

  • Colville, Alex (Canadian painter)

    Alex Colville, Canadian painter whose detailed works depicted everyday subject matter and possessed a mysterious, mythic quality that belied psychological acuity. Though he worked during the heyday of the abstract art movement, Colville never deviated from his figurative style. Upon graduating from

  • Colville, David Alexander (Canadian painter)

    Alex Colville, Canadian painter whose detailed works depicted everyday subject matter and possessed a mysterious, mythic quality that belied psychological acuity. Though he worked during the heyday of the abstract art movement, Colville never deviated from his figurative style. Upon graduating from

  • Colvilletown (British Columbia, Canada)

    Nanaimo, city, southwestern British Columbia, Canada, on Vancouver Island and the Georgia Strait. Founded as Colvilletown around a Hudson’s Bay Company trading post, it developed after 1849 when coalfields were discovered nearby by the Indians. In 1860 the settlement was renamed Sne-ny-mo (whence

  • Colvin, Douglas Glenn (American musician)

    Dee Dee Ramone, (Douglas Glenn Colvin), American musician and songwriter (born Sept. 18, 1952, Fort Lee, Va.—died June 5, 2002, Hollywood, Calif.), was a founder and the principal songwriter of the punk rock pioneers the Ramones and was a member of that group from 1974 until 1989, when he e

  • Colvin, Marie (American journalist)

    Marie Catherine Colvin, American journalist (born Jan. 12, 1956, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.—died Feb. 22, 2012, Homs, Syria), reported on the effects of war on civilian populations, repeatedly placing herself in harm’s way with the beleaguered populations to bring their stories and the horror of

  • Colvin, Marie Catherine (American journalist)

    Marie Catherine Colvin, American journalist (born Jan. 12, 1956, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.—died Feb. 22, 2012, Homs, Syria), reported on the effects of war on civilian populations, repeatedly placing herself in harm’s way with the beleaguered populations to bring their stories and the horror of

  • Colvin, Sidney (English scholar)

    Robert Louis Stevenson: Early life: …Suffolk, England, where he met Sidney Colvin, the English scholar, who became a lifelong friend, and Fanny Sitwell (who later married Colvin). Sitwell, an older woman of charm and talent, drew the young man out and won his confidence. Soon Stevenson was deeply in love, and on his return to…

  • Colwyn Bay (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Colwyn Bay, seaside resort town and urban area (from 2011 built-up area), Conwy county borough, historic county of Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych), northern Wales. It lies on the North Wales coast of the Irish Sea. The town, which dates from the 19th century, grew rapidly after World War I to become

  • coly (bird genus)

    Coly, any member of the genus Colius, a group of African birds that, because of their long, drooping tails, look much like mice when seen running along branches. The single genus (Colius) and six species constitute the family Coliidae, order Coliiformes. The body is sparrow sized, but the tail m

  • Colymbiformes (former bird order)

    Colymbiformes, former taxonomic order that included the water birds known as loons and grebes. Later scholarship determined that these two groups were not related, and ornithologists devised new and separate classifications for them: Gaviiformes (loons) and Podicipediformes (sometimes spelled

  • colza (plant)

    Rape, (Brassica napus, variety napus), plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), grown for its seeds, which yield canola, or rapeseed, oil. Canola oil is variously used in cooking, as an ingredient in soap and margarine, and as a lamp fuel (colza oil). The esterified form of the oil is used as a

  • coma (pathology)

    Coma, state of unconsciousness, characterized by loss of reaction to external stimuli and absence of spontaneous nervous activity, usually associated with injury to the cerebrum. Coma may accompany a number of metabolic disorders or physical injuries to the brain from disease or trauma. Different

  • coma (optics)

    optics: Coma: The S2 term in the OPD expression represents the aberration called coma, in which the image of a point has the appearance of a comet. The x′ and y′ components are as follows:

  • coma (comet)

    comet: …comet nucleus known as a coma. As dust and gas in the coma flow freely into space, the comet forms two tails, one composed of ionized molecules and radicals and one of dust. The word comet comes from the Greek κομητης (kometes), which means “long-haired.” Indeed, it is the appearance…

  • Coma Berenices (constellation)

    Coma Berenices, (Latin: “Berenice’s Hair”) constellation in the northern sky at about 13 hours right ascension and 20° north in declination. Its brightest star is Beta Comae Berenices, with a magnitude of 4.3. This constellation contains the Coma cluster of galaxies, the nearest rich galaxy cluster

  • Coma cluster (galaxy cluster)

    Coma cluster, nearest rich cluster of galaxies containing thousands of systems. The Coma cluster lies about 330 million light-years away, about seven times farther than the Virgo cluster, in the direction of the constellation Coma Berenices. The main body of the Coma cluster has a diameter of about

  • coma dépassé (medicine)

    death: Evolution of the concept of brain-stem death: …described a condition they called coma dépassé (literally, “a state beyond coma”). Their patients all had primary, irremediable, structural brain lesions; were deeply comatose; and were incapable of spontaneous breathing. They had not only lost their ability to react to the external world, but they also could no longer control…

  • Comáin, Ros (Ireland)

    Roscommon, market and county town (seat), County Roscommon, Ireland, lying northwest of Dublin. A monastery and school were established on the site in the 7th century by St. Coman. In the town and its environs are the remains of a Dominican abbey founded in 1253 by Felim O’Connor, king of Connacht,

  • Comáin, Ros (county, Ireland)

    Roscommon, county in the province of Connaught, north-central Ireland. It is bounded by Counties Sligo (north), Leitrim (northeast), Longford and Westmeath (east), Offaly (southeast), Galway (southwest), and Mayo (west). The town of Roscommon, in the central part of the county, is the county town

  • Comal River (river, Texas, United States)

    New Braunfels: …at a point where the Comal River (3 miles [5 km] long and within city limits) flows into the Guadalupe River, 30 miles (50 km) northeast of San Antonio. The community was established in 1845 by a group of German immigrants led by Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels and sponsored by…

  • Coman languages

    Komuz languages, a branch of the Nilo-Saharan language family formed by a group of related languages spoken in the border area that separates Ethiopia from Sudan and South Sudan. The Komuz group consists of Koma, Twampa (Uduk), Kwama, and Opo (Opo-Shita). Another variety of Komuz, known as Gule

  • Coman languages

    Nilo-Saharan languages: Linguistic characteristics: …consonants—are found, for example, in Koma, a Komuz language of western Ethiopia; comparable consonant distinctions occur in such Omotic (Afro-Asiatic) languages as Maale (southwestern Ethiopia). Several Central Sudanic languages, most of which are situated along the southern fringe of the Nilo-Saharan zone, share the presence of complex consonant systems with…

  • Comana (Turkey)

    Comana, ancient city of Cappadocia, on the upper course of the Seyhan (Sarus) River, in southern Turkey. Often called Chryse to distinguish it from Comana in Pontus, it was the place where the cult of Ma-Enyo, a variant of the great west Asian mother goddess, was celebrated with orgiastic rites.

  • Comana Cappadociae (ancient city, Turkey)

    Hebat: …Hebat had cult centres at Kummanni (classical Comana Cappadociae) and at Aleppo (Ḥalab) and other cities in the region of the Taurus Mountains. Hebat is represented as a matronly figure either standing on a lion or seated on a throne. She survived during Hellenistic times as Hipta, a goddess of…

  • Comana of Pontus (ancient city, Turkey)

    Tokat: …near the site of ancient Comana of Pontus, one of the most important cities of the Pontus district during the Roman period. Tokat rose to prominence after Comana’s decline in Byzantine times. During the 11th–13th century it was an important city of a Turkmen principality and later of the Seljuq…

  • Comanche (people)

    Comanche, North American Indian tribe of equestrian nomads whose 18th- and 19th-century territory comprised the southern Great Plains. The name Comanche is derived from a Ute word meaning “anyone who wants to fight me all the time.” The Comanche had previously been part of the Wyoming Shoshone.

  • Comanche Station (film by Boetticher [1960])

    Budd Boetticher: Westerns: …last picture in the cycle, Comanche Station, was released. The solid western found Scott’s lone hero searching for a woman who has been kidnapped by Comanches.

  • Comandante (documentary film by Stone [2003])

    Oliver Stone: …documentaries about Latin American politics: Comandante (2003), about Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, and South of the Border (2009), which focused on several other left-wing leaders, notably Venezuelan Pres. Hugo Chávez. He revisited both leaders in the documentaries Castro in Winter (2012) and Mi amigo Hugo (2014; “My Friend Hugo”). With…

  • Comando de Libertação Nacional (Brazilian militant group)

    Dilma Rousseff: Early life and political career: …associated with the militant group National Liberation Command (Comando de Libertação Nacional; Colina), and she married fellow activist Cláudio Galeno Linhares in 1968. After a raid on a Colina safe house resulted in police fatalities, the pair went into hiding in Rio de Janeiro. She and Galeno later fled Rio…

  • Comando por el No (political organization, Chile)

    Chile: Government: …this group was renamed the Coalition of Parties for Democracy (Concertación de los Partidos por la Democracia; CPD). Negotiations between the CPD and Pinochet’s government in 1989 resulted in the removal of the ban on Marxist parties, just one of the amendments to the 1981 constitution that was voted on…

  • Comandra (plant genus)

    bastard toadflax: …to plants of the genus Comandra. They are sometimes parasitic on the roots of other plants and have creeping roots, small white flowers clustered at the top of each plant, and one-seeded fruits.

  • Comăneci, Nadia (Romanian gymnast)

    Nadia Comăneci, Romanian gymnast who was the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic event. Comăneci was discovered by Bela Karolyi, later the Romanian gymnastics coach, when she was six years old. She first competed in the national junior championships in 1969, placing

  • Comans, Marc de (Flemish artist)

    tapestry: 17th and 18th centuries: …van den Planken; 1573–1627) and Marc de Comans (1563–before 1650). Satisfactory working conditions were found for them in the old Gobelins family dyeworks on the outskirts of the city, and so began the establishment commonly known by that name that has lasted ever since. One of its first ambitious productions…

  • comarital therapy (psychology)

    sex therapy: Comarital therapy refers to the Masters and Johnson model, in which both members of the couple are treated by a team consisting of one male and one female therapist. The couple approach recognizes that sexual dysfunctions take place in the context of the interaction between…

  • comatulid (echinoderm)

    Feather star, any of the 550 living species of crinoid marine invertebrates (class Crinoidea) of the phylum Echinodermata lacking a stalk. The arms, which have feathery fringes and can be used for swimming, usually number five. Feather stars use their grasping “legs” (called cirri) to perch on

  • Comatulida (echinoderm)

    Feather star, any of the 550 living species of crinoid marine invertebrates (class Crinoidea) of the phylum Echinodermata lacking a stalk. The arms, which have feathery fringes and can be used for swimming, usually number five. Feather stars use their grasping “legs” (called cirri) to perch on

  • Comayagua (Honduras)

    Comayagua, city, west-central Honduras, on the right bank of the Humuya River in a fertile valley. Founded in 1537 as Valladolid de Santa María de Comayagua, the city served as the Spanish colonial capital of Honduras province. A variation of its name, Comayaguela, is used for the government

  • comb (implement and ornament)

    Comb, a toothed implement used for cleaning and arranging the hair and also for holding it in place after it has been arranged. The word is also applied, from resemblance in form or in use, to various appliances employed for dressing wool and other fibrous substances, to the indented fleshy crest

  • comb fern (plant)

    fern: Annotated classification: …thickened cells; 2 genera (Schizaea and Actinostachys) with about 30 species, mostly tropical. Family Lygodiaceae Rhizomes long-creeping, hairy; leaves indeterminate in growth, climbing and often twining, the primary divisions alternate along the elongating stemlike rachis; sporangia often in two rows, densely spaced along specialized slender lobes of the ultimate…

  • comb honey (beekeeping)

    beekeeping: Comb honey: In production of honey in the comb, or comb honey, extreme care is necessary to prevent the bees’ swarming. The colony must be strong, and the bees must be crowded into the smallest space they will tolerate without swarming. New frames or sections…

  • comb jelly (marine invertebrate)

    Ctenophore, any of the numerous marine invertebrates constituting the phylum Ctenophora. The phylum derives its name (from the Greek ctene, or “comb,” and phora, or “bearer”) from the series of vertical ciliary combs over the surface of the animal. The body form resembles that of the cnidarian

  • comb pottery

    Comb pottery, main pottery type of the Korean Neolithic Period (c. 3000–700 bce). Derived from a Siberian Neolithic prototype, the pottery is made of sandy clay, and its colour is predominantly reddish brown. The vessel form found in early comb pottery is a simple V-shape with a pointed or rounded

  • comb row (ctenophore anatomy)

    ctenophore: Form and function.: …their beautifully iridescent rows of comb plates. Most of the comb jellies are bioluminescent; they exhibit nocturnal displays of bluish or greenish light that are among the most brilliant and beautiful known in the animal kingdom.

  • comb shell (bivalve)

    Scallop, any of the marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pectinidae, particularly species of the genus Pecten. The family, which includes about 50 genera and subgenera and more than 400 species, is worldwide in distribution and ranges from the intertidal zone to considerable ocean depths. The two

  • comb-clawed beetle (insect)

    Comb-clawed beetle, (subfamily Alleculinae), any of numerous insects in the order Coleoptera that are known for the comblike appearance of their claws. Their oval bodies are typically a glossy brown or black in colour. The adults are usually found on flowers or leaves and the larvae in rotten wood

  • comb-footed spider (arachnid)

    Comb-footed spider, any member of the spider family Theridiidae (order Araneida). The more than 1,000 species of comb-footed spiders are distributed around the world, and they include the black widow. The webs of theridiids consist of an irregular network of threads from which the spider often

  • Combahee River (river, South Carolina, United States)

    Combahee River, river formed in southern South Carolina, U.S., by the confluence of the Salkehatchie and Little Salkehatchie rivers. It flows 40 miles (64 km) southeast to join the Coosaw River near its mouth on Saint Helena Sound. Combahee is derived from the name of a Muskogean-speaking Native

  • Combat (French newspaper)

    history of Europe: Planning the peace: …was the masthead slogan of Combat, the left-wing French Resistance newspaper founded in 1941 but after the war edited as a Paris daily by the novelist Albert Camus. The words could well have been endorsed by others, especially the radical Action Party in Italy and many socialists there and elsewhere.

  • Combat Body Armour (body armour)

    armour: Modern body armour systems: …the late 1980s a lightweight Combat Body Armour (CBA) was introduced, consisting of a vest with soft ballistic filler capable of protecting against fragments and 9-mm pistol rounds. The Enhanced Body Armour (EBA) version could be reinforced with ceramic plates for greater protection against higher-velocity projectiles. In response to combat…

  • combat brigade (military unit)

    military unit: A combat brigade, for example, usually has infantry, armour, artillery, and reconnaissance units.

  • combat dance (ritual dance)

    dance: Defining according to function: …as descendants of the tribal war and hunting dances that have also been integral to many cultures. War dances, often using weapons and fighting movements, were used throughout history as a way of training soldiers and preparing them emotionally and spiritually for battle. Many hunting tribes performed dances in which…

  • combat dance (snake behaviour)

    snake: Mating: The combat dance engaged in by two males is believed to be a competitive behaviour for the acquisition of females during the breeding season. As in the courtship dance, the front of the bodies entwine and are raised higher and higher off the ground until finally…

  • combat drill (military)

    drill: …types: close-order and extended-order, or combat drill. Close-order drill comprises the formal movements and formations used in marching, parades, and ceremonies. Combat drill trains a small unit in the looser, extended formations and movements of battle.

  • combat effectiveness (military)

    Combat effectiveness, the readiness of a military unit to engage in combat based on behavioral, operational, and leadership considerations. Combat effectiveness measures the ability of a military force to accomplish its objective and is one component of overall military effectiveness. The

  • combat fatigue (psychology)

    Combat fatigue, a neurotic disorder caused by the stress involved in war. This anxiety-related disorder is characterized by (1) hypersensitivity to stimuli such as noises, movements, and light accompanied by overactive responses that include involuntary defensive jerking or jumping (startle

  • Combat Information Center (United States organization)

    naval warfare: The age of the aircraft carrier: …of modern C2 was the Combat Information Center, which centralized radar information and voice radio communications. By 1944 the tactical doctrine of coordinating fighter air defenses, along with the now much strengthened antiaircraft firepower on ships of the fleet, was so effective that in the Battle of the Philippine Sea…

  • combat intelligence

    intelligence: Levels of intelligence: Tactical intelligence, sometimes called operational or combat intelligence, is information required by military field commanders. Because of the enormous destructive power of modern weaponry, the decision making of political leaders often must take into account information derived from tactical as well as strategic intelligence; major…

  • Combat of Love and Chastity (work by Perugino)

    Perugino: Late work: …is certainly true that the Combat of Love and Chastity was commissioned in 1503 by Isabella d’Este and was delivered only in 1505, after a great many letters had passed between all concerned, at which time Isabella expressed herself as satisfied but only moderately so. Perugino left Florence about 1505…

  • Combat of Tancredi and Clorinda, The (work by Monteverdi)

    Claudio Monteverdi: Three decades in Venice: …found in his dramatic cantata, The Combat of Tancredi and Clorinda (1624), a setting of a section of Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata. In this work, the rapid reiteration of single notes in strict rhythms and the use of pizzicato—plucking strings—to express the clashing of swords show important steps forward in the…

  • Combat Rock (album by the Clash)

    Joe Strummer: Combat Rock (1982) featured the popular anthem “Rock the Casbah,” but it was the beginning of the end for the group, which disbanded in 1985.

  • combat spread (aviation)

    formation flying: …a formation known as “combat spread.” Whereas airplanes in close formations may be a metre or so apart, in a combat spread formation modern jet-engine fighters may be several hundred metres apart.

  • combat support (military logistics)

    military unit: …different types of combat and support units into a functional organization. A combat brigade, for example, usually has infantry, armour, artillery, and reconnaissance units.

  • Combat Support Hospital (military hospital)

    battlefield medicine: …facility they reach is the Combat Support Hospital (CSH). The CSH staff includes specialists such as orthopedic and oral surgeons and psychiatrists. The CSH is modular in design and can be configured in sizes from 44 to 248 beds as needed. It is assembled from metal shelters and climate-controlled tents,…

  • combat unit (military unit)

    military unit: …to integrate different types of combat and support units into a functional organization. A combat brigade, for example, usually has infantry, armour, artillery, and reconnaissance units.

  • combat vehicle game (electronic game genre)

    electronic vehicle game: Combat games: One of the earliest combat vehicle games was Atari’s Tank (1974), a black-and-white arcade game for two people in which the players each used two joysticks to maneuver their tanks around an obstacle-strewn field while shooting at each other. Atari also produced two…

  • Combat! (American television series)

    Robert Altman: Early years: …for years, directing episodes of Combat, Bonanza, and Alfred Hitchcock Presents, among many other programs.

  • Combat, Le (ballet by Dollar)

    William Dollar: …originally staged in 1949 as Le Combat for Roland Petit’s Ballets de Paris. His later works included The Leaf and the Wind (1954) and Mendelssohn Concerto (1958). He worked with ballet companies in Brazil, Japan, and Monte Carlo.

  • combat, ordeal by (trial process)

    ordeal: In ordeal by combat, or ritual combat, the victor is said to win not by his own strength but because supernatural powers have intervened on the side of the right, as in the duel in the European Middle Ages in which the “judgment of God” was…

  • combat, trial by (trial process)

    ordeal: In ordeal by combat, or ritual combat, the victor is said to win not by his own strength but because supernatural powers have intervened on the side of the right, as in the duel in the European Middle Ages in which the “judgment of God” was…

  • Combatant Commands (United States military)

    Unified Command Plan: …joint commands are known as Combatant Commands (COCOMS) and receive their missions, planning, training, and operational responsibilities from the UCP.

  • Combating the Crisis in Darfur

    In 2008, five years after conflict broke out in the Darfur region of The Sudan, the prospect seemed dim for a political settlement to end the war that had killed as many as 300,000 people. In early 2003, soon after local rebel groups took up arms against the Khartoum-based regime of Sudanese Pres.

  • combats des taureaux (spectacle)

    Bullfighting, the national spectacle of Spain and many Spanish-speaking countries, in which a bull is ceremoniously fought in a sand arena by a matador and usually killed. Bullfighting is also popular in Portugal and southern France, though in the former, where the bull is engaged by a bullfighter

  • combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda, Il (work by Monteverdi)

    Claudio Monteverdi: Three decades in Venice: …found in his dramatic cantata, The Combat of Tancredi and Clorinda (1624), a setting of a section of Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata. In this work, the rapid reiteration of single notes in strict rhythms and the use of pizzicato—plucking strings—to express the clashing of swords show important steps forward in the…

  • Combe de Queyras (canyon, France)

    Queyras: …slim canyon known as the Combe de Queyras is bounded by limestone precipices about 650 feet (200 metres) high and narrows occasionally to a mere fissure. The Queyras Regional Park, created in 1977, encompasses some 150,000 acres (60,000 hectares).

  • Combe, George (Scottish phrenologist)

    phrenology: …Johann Kaspar Spurzheim (1776–1832) and George Combe (1788–1858). Phrenology enjoyed great popular appeal well into the 20th century but has been wholly discredited by scientific research.

  • Combe, Joseph (French pottery manufacturer)

    Lyon faience: In about 1733 Joseph Combe tried to revive the manufacture of more sumptuous wares, but Lyon’s faience remained derivative, this time of Moustiers, the birthplace of Combe. Later in the century it was almost indistinguishable from that of Turin; it had the same medley of Chinese and architectural…

  • Your preference has been recorded
    Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!