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  • Colebrook-Cameron Commission (British commission)

    Colebrook-Cameron Commission, committee sent by the British government in 1829–32 to investigate its colonial government in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and to make recommendations for administrative, financial, economic, and judicial reform. Most of the recommendations were accepted; they signified for

  • Colebrookdale porcelain (pottery)

    Coalport porcelain, ware from the porcelain factory in Shropshire, England, founded by John Rose in 1795. “Coalbrookdale Porcelain” was used sometimes as a trade description and a mark because the factory was located at Coalbrookdale. Coalport’s glazed bone china was in great demand and improved

  • colectivo (vehicle)

    Buenos Aires: Transportation: …Buenos Aires around the unique colectivo, or microbus, an Argentine invention. Half the size of a typical city bus, it is usually crammed with people and often barely pauses as passengers jump on and off. The drivers, who are generally owners of the cooperative that operates the bus line, are…

  • Coleford (England, United Kingdom)

    Forest of Dean: Coleford, in the west, is the administrative centre.

  • Colegate, Isabel (British writer)

    Isabel Colegate, British author of novels about life among the upper classes in England during the 20th century. At the age of 19 Colegate began working as an assistant to literary agent Anthony Blond. When Blond became a publisher, one of the first books he brought was Colgate’s first novel, The

  • Colegate, Isabel Diana (British writer)

    Isabel Colegate, British author of novels about life among the upper classes in England during the 20th century. At the age of 19 Colegate began working as an assistant to literary agent Anthony Blond. When Blond became a publisher, one of the first books he brought was Colgate’s first novel, The

  • colegiado (Uruguayan history)

    Uruguay: Modernization and reform: …with a plural executive, the colegiado. Batlle’s audacious plan split the Colorados and reinvigorated the Blanco opposition, and in 1916 the colegiado was defeated in the country’s first election by secret ballot. Batlle retained a significant amount of prestige and support, however, which allowed him to strike a compromise that…

  • colegio (Spanish college)

    college: …Swedish nation and the Spanish colegio are contemporary continental efforts to gain some of the advantages of the older system.

  • Colégio Nordestino (Brazilian literature)

    Northeastern school, group of 20th-century Brazilian regional writers whose fiction dealt primarily with the culture and social problems of Brazil’s hinterland Northeast. Stimulated by the Modernist-led revival of nationalism of the 1920s, the regionalists looked to the diverse ethnic and racial c

  • Colegrove v. Green (law case)

    Baker v. Carr: …apportionment cases; in 1946 in Colegrove v. Green the court said apportionment was a “political thicket” into which the judiciary should not intrude. In the Baker case, however, the court held that each vote should carry equal weight regardless of the voter’s place of residence. Thus the legislature of Tennessee…

  • Coleman, Bessie (American aviator)

    Bessie Coleman, American aviator and a star of early aviation exhibitions and air shows. One of 13 children, Coleman grew up in Waxahatchie, Texas, where her mathematical aptitude freed her from working in the cotton fields. She attended college in Langston, Oklahoma, briefly, before moving to

  • Coleman, Cedric (American rapper)
  • Coleman, Cy (American musician and composer)

    Cy Coleman, (Seymour Kaufman), American jazz pianist and composer (born June 14, 1929, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 18, 2004, New York City), was at first a classical pianist but then turned to jazz and began partnering with lyricists to write songs. Many of them became popular standards, as did s

  • Coleman, Derrick (American basketball player)

    Brooklyn Nets: …Petrović, as well as forward Derrick Coleman. However, this Nets squad was undone by Petrović’s sudden death in a car accident in 1993 and a spate of misbehaviour and inconsistent play by Anderson and Coleman that resulted in a near-complete roster turnover by the end of the 1995–96 season, after…

  • Coleman, Elizabeth (American aviator)

    Bessie Coleman, American aviator and a star of early aviation exhibitions and air shows. One of 13 children, Coleman grew up in Waxahatchie, Texas, where her mathematical aptitude freed her from working in the cotton fields. She attended college in Langston, Oklahoma, briefly, before moving to

  • Coleman, Gary (American actor)

    Gary Wayne Coleman, American actor (born Feb. 8, 1968, Zion, Ill.—died May 28, 2010, Provo, Utah), achieved early stardom in the television sitcom Diff’rent Strokes (1978–86) with his portrayal of the younger of two impoverished African American brothers adopted by a wealthy white businessman after

  • Coleman, Georgia (American athlete)

    Georgia Coleman, American diver, the first woman to perform a forward 212 somersault dive in competition. She won several Olympic medals, including a gold in the springboard event. Coleman had been diving for just six months when she entered the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam, where she won a

  • Coleman, James S. (American sociologist)

    James S. Coleman, American sociologist, a pioneer in mathematical sociology whose studies strongly influenced education policy in the United States. Coleman received a B.S. from Purdue University (1949) and a Ph.D. from Columbia University (1955), where he was a research associate in the Bureau of

  • Coleman, James Samuel (American sociologist)

    James S. Coleman, American sociologist, a pioneer in mathematical sociology whose studies strongly influenced education policy in the United States. Coleman received a B.S. from Purdue University (1949) and a Ph.D. from Columbia University (1955), where he was a research associate in the Bureau of

  • Coleman, Katherine (American mathematician)

    Katherine Johnson, American mathematician who calculated and analyzed the flight paths of many spacecraft during her more than three decades with the U.S. space program. Her work helped send astronauts to the Moon. Coleman’s intelligence and skill with numbers became apparent when she was a child,

  • Coleman, Norm (United States senator)

    Tim Pawlenty: …in favour of another candidate—Norm Coleman, the mayor of St. Paul, who had switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party in 1996. In 2001 Pawlenty intended to make a bid for the U.S. Senate but was persuaded not to run—again in favour of Coleman—by Vice Pres. Dick…

  • Coleman, Ornette (American musician)

    Ornette Coleman, American jazz saxophonist, composer, and bandleader who was the principal initiator and leading exponent of free jazz in the late 1950s. Coleman began playing alto, then tenor saxophone as a teenager and soon became a working musician in dance bands and rhythm-and-blues groups.

  • colemanite (mineral)

    Colemanite, borate mineral, hydrated calcium borate (Ca2B6O11·5H2O) that was the principal source of borax until the 1930s. It typically occurs as colourless, brilliant crystals and masses in Paleogene and Neogene sediments (those formed 65.5 to 2.6 million years ago), where it has been derived

  • Çölemerik (Turkey)

    Hakkâri, city, capital of Hakkâri il (province), southeastern Turkey. It lies at an elevation of about 5,500 feet (1,700 metres), surrounded by mountains and overlooked by a medieval fortress, the former residence of its Kurdish rulers. A market for local livestock and livestock products, Hakkâri

  • Colenso, John (Anglican bishop of Natal, South Africa)

    John Colenso, controversial liberal Anglican bishop of Natal. He made numerous converts among the Zulus, who caused him to abandon certain religious tenets and thus be subjected to trial for heresy. Colenso became rector of Forncett St. Mary’s Church, Norfolk, in 1846 and in 1853 bishop of Natal,

  • coleoid (cephalopod subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: …recent species); Ammonoida (fossils); and Coleoida (fossils and 4 recent orders). Many aspects of molluscan classification remain unsettled, particularly for gastropods and bivalves. The Amphineura, the former name for a group made up of the Polyplacophora (chitons) and Aplacophora (caudofoveates and solenogasters) within one subphylum, has been replaced…

  • Coleoida (cephalopod subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: …recent species); Ammonoida (fossils); and Coleoida (fossils and 4 recent orders). Many aspects of molluscan classification remain unsettled, particularly for gastropods and bivalves. The Amphineura, the former name for a group made up of the Polyplacophora (chitons) and Aplacophora (caudofoveates and solenogasters) within one subphylum, has been replaced…

  • Coleoida (cephalopod subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: …recent species); Ammonoida (fossils); and Coleoida (fossils and 4 recent orders). Many aspects of molluscan classification remain unsettled, particularly for gastropods and bivalves. The Amphineura, the former name for a group made up of the Polyplacophora (chitons) and Aplacophora (caudofoveates and solenogasters) within one subphylum, has been replaced…

  • Coleoidea (cephalopod subclass)

    mollusk: Annotated classification: …recent species); Ammonoida (fossils); and Coleoida (fossils and 4 recent orders). Many aspects of molluscan classification remain unsettled, particularly for gastropods and bivalves. The Amphineura, the former name for a group made up of the Polyplacophora (chitons) and Aplacophora (caudofoveates and solenogasters) within one subphylum, has been replaced…

  • Coleonyx variegatus (reptile)

    gecko: The banded gecko (Coleonyx variegatus), the most widespread native North American species, grows to 15 cm (6 inches) and is pinkish to yellowish tan with darker bands and splotches. The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), native to Southeast Asia, is the largest species, attaining a length of…

  • Coleophoridae (insect)

    lepidopteran: Annotated classification: Coleophoridae (casebearer moths) Approximately 1,400 species, mainly Holarctic in distribution; small, very narrow-winged moths; larvae mostly mine leaves or feed on seeds; many larvae construct portable cases with distinctive shapes; some are pests of fruit trees. Family Oecophoridae (oecophorid moths) More than 3,100 small

  • Coleoptera (insect)

    Coleopteran, (order Coleoptera), any member of the insect order Coleoptera, consisting of the beetles and weevils. It is the largest order of insects, representing about 40 percent of the known insect species. Among the over 360,000 species of Coleoptera are many of the largest and most conspicuous

  • coleopteran (insect)

    Coleopteran, (order Coleoptera), any member of the insect order Coleoptera, consisting of the beetles and weevils. It is the largest order of insects, representing about 40 percent of the known insect species. Among the over 360,000 species of Coleoptera are many of the largest and most conspicuous

  • coleoptile (plant anatomy)

    plant development: Origin of the primary organs: …cell forms part of the coleoptile and also gives rise to the shoot apex and the tissues of the root and coleorhiza. The embryo is asymmetrical, with the shoot apex lying on one side in a notch, ensheathed by the coleoptile.

  • coleorhiza (grass)

    plant development: Origin of the primary organs: …tissues of the root and coleorhiza. The embryo is asymmetrical, with the shoot apex lying on one side in a notch, ensheathed by the coleoptile.

  • Coleorrhyncha (insect)

    homopteran: Annotated classification: Suborder Coleorrhyncha Origin of beak at antero-ventral extremity of face; propleura form a sheath for base of beak; hind wings absent; forewings held flat over abdomen when at rest; no flight function; prothorax with paranota; digestive tract lacks filter chamber. Family Pelorididae Most primitive Homoptera; Tasmania,…

  • coleostat (photographic device)

    Gabriel Lippmann: He also invented the coleostat, an instrument that allowed for long-exposure photographs of the sky by compensating for the Earth’s motion during the exposure.

  • Colepeper of Thoresway, John Colepeper, 1st Baron (English statesman)

    John Colepeper, 1st Baron Colepeper, English statesman who was an influential counsellor of Charles I during the Civil War and of Charles II in exile. Elected member for Kent in the Long Parliament, he took the popular side, supporting the Earl of Strafford’s attainder and receiving an appointment

  • Colepeper, John Colepeper, 1st Baron (English statesman)

    John Colepeper, 1st Baron Colepeper, English statesman who was an influential counsellor of Charles I during the Civil War and of Charles II in exile. Elected member for Kent in the Long Parliament, he took the popular side, supporting the Earl of Strafford’s attainder and receiving an appointment

  • Coleraine (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Coleraine, town and former district (1973–2015) astride the former counties of Antrim and Londonderry, now part of the Causeway Coast and Glens district, Northern Ireland. Coleraine town is located near the mouth of the River Bann. It is the administrative centre of the Causeway Coast and Glens

  • Coleraine (district, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Coleraine: The former district of Coleraine was bordered by the former districts of Limavady to the west, Magherafelt to the south, and Ballymoney and Moyle to the east and by the Atlantic Ocean to the north. Western Coleraine is composed of wooded hilly terrain that slopes eastward to the River…

  • Coleraine, Richard Kidston Law, 1st Baron (British politician)

    Richard Kidston Law, 1st Baron Coleraine, British politician who served as minister of state at the Foreign Office (1943–45) during World War II and later as minister of education (1945). The son of Bonar Law, U.K. prime minister from October 1922 to May 1923, Richard Law opposed appeasement of

  • Coleridge (essay by Mill)

    John Stuart Mill: Public life and writing: …twin essays on Bentham and Coleridge show Mill’s powers at their splendid best and indicate very clearly the new spirit that he tried to breathe into English radicalism.

  • Coleridge, David Hartley (British poet)

    Hartley Coleridge, English poet whose wayward talent found expression in his skillful and sensitive sonnets. The eldest son of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, he spent his childhood alarming and delighting his family and the Southeys and Wordsworths by his mental agility and the “exquisite

  • Coleridge, Derwent (British educator)

    teacher education: Early development: The work of Derwent Coleridge, principal of St. Mark’s College, London, who admitted that he took his models not from the pedagogical seminaries of Germany but from the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, exemplified the attempt to introduce a larger element of general education into teacher preparation. Sir…

  • Coleridge, Hartley (British poet)

    Hartley Coleridge, English poet whose wayward talent found expression in his skillful and sensitive sonnets. The eldest son of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, he spent his childhood alarming and delighting his family and the Southeys and Wordsworths by his mental agility and the “exquisite

  • Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (British poet and critic)

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English lyrical poet, critic, and philosopher. His Lyrical Ballads, written with William Wordsworth, heralded the English Romantic movement, and his Biographia Literaria (1817) is the most significant work of general literary criticism produced in the English Romantic

  • Coleridge, Sara (British author)

    Sara Coleridge, English translator and author of children’s verse, known primarily as the editor of the works of her father, Samuel Taylor Coleridge. During her childhood, her father was seldom at home, and his brother-in-law Robert Southey chiefly influenced Sara’s early years. She did not see her

  • Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel (British composer)

    Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, English composer who enjoyed considerable acclaim in the early years of the 20th century. Coleridge-Taylor’s father, thwarted in his attempts to progress as a physician—through apparent racial prejudice—deserted his son and English wife and returned to his native West

  • Coleroon River (river, India)

    Kollidam River, river, east-central Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. Formed by the northern bifurcation of the Kaveri (Cauvery) River just west of Srirangam, the Kollidam River flows in an easterly and then northeasterly direction for about 95 miles (150 km) and empties through several mouths

  • Coles, Elizabeth (British author)

    Elizabeth Taylor, British novelist noted for her precise use of language and scrupulously understated style. Her first novel, At Mrs Lippincote’s, was published in 1945; like most of her work, it has a largely uneventful plot but portrays with unerring accuracy the behaviour of women in

  • Colet, John (English theologian and educator)

    John Colet, theologian and founder of St. Paul’s School, London, who, as one of the chief Tudor Humanists, promoted Renaissance culture in England. The son of a prosperous merchant who had been Lord Mayor of London, Colet studied mathematics and philosophy at Oxford and then travelled and studied

  • Colet, Louise (French writer)

    Louise Colet, French poet and novelist, as noted for her friendships with leading men of letters as for her own work. Daughter of a businessman, she married a musician, Hippolyte Colet, in 1834, and published her first poetry, “Fleurs du Midi,” in 1836. Her Paris salon became a meeting place for

  • Colette (French writer)

    Colette, outstanding French writer of the first half of the 20th century whose best novels, largely concerned with the pains and pleasures of love, are remarkable for their command of sensual description. Her greatest strength as a writer is an exact sensory evocation of sounds, smells, tastes,

  • Colette, Saint (Roman Catholic abbess)

    Saint Colette, ; canonized 1807; feast day March 6), abbess, reformer of the Poor Clares and founder of the Colettine Poor Clares. The daughter of a carpenter at the monastery of Corbie, she was orphaned at 17 and entered the third order of St. Francis, living in a hermitage given her by the abbot

  • Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle (French writer)

    Colette, outstanding French writer of the first half of the 20th century whose best novels, largely concerned with the pains and pleasures of love, are remarkable for their command of sensual description. Her greatest strength as a writer is an exact sensory evocation of sounds, smells, tastes,

  • Colettine Poor Clare (religious order)

    Poor Clare: …the Colettine Poor Clares, or Poor Clares of St. Colette (P.C.C.), and today are located mostly in France. The Capuchin Sisters, originating in Naples in 1538, and the Alcantarines, of 1631, are also Poor Clares of the strict observance.

  • coleus (plant)

    Coleus, any of several ornamental plants in the mint family (Lamiaceae), grown for the bright colours and patterns of their leaves. The plants were formerly grouped in the genus Coleus, but their taxonomy is contentious and molecular data suggest that the species are distributed across several

  • Coleus blumei (plant)

    coleus: Varieties of common coleus, or painted nettle (Plectranthus scutellarioides, formerly Coleus blumei), from Java, are well-known house and garden plants up to one metre (three feet) tall. They have square stems and small, blue, two-lipped flowers borne in spikes. The leaves are often variegated with colourful patterns…

  • Coleus thyrsoideus (plant)

    coleus: Bush coleus, or blue Plectranthus (P. thyrsoideus, formerly C. thyrsoideus), from Central Africa, reaches a height of one metre and produces sprays of bright blue flowers. The leaves have distinctive venation and are often green with white borders.

  • colewort (plant)

    Collard, (Brassica oleracea, variety acephala), form of cabbage, of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The plant is a source of nutritionally important minerals and vitamins A and C. It is commonly raised as a source of winter greens in the southern United States, where it is customarily boiled

  • Coley, Doris (American singer)

    Doris Coley, (Doris Kenner-Jackson), American singer (born Aug. 2, 1941, Goldsboro, N.C.—died Feb. 4, 2000, Sacramento, Calif.), was one of the Shirelles, the all-girl pop group that created a sensation in the late 1950s and early ’60s with a string of hits that included “Tonight’s the Night” (

  • Colfax (county, New Mexico, United States)

    Colfax, county, northeastern New Mexico, U.S., bordered on the north by Colorado. Its westernmost section is in the Southern Rocky Mountains and includes the Cimarron range, topped by 12,441-foot (3,782-metre) Baldy Peak, and the Sangre de Cristo range, which rises to more than 10,000 feet (3,000

  • Colfax, Schuyler (vice president of United States)

    Schuyler Colfax, 17th vice president of the United States (1869–73) in the Republican administration of President Ulysses S. Grant. Colfax was the posthumous son of a bank clerk, Schuyler Colfax, and Hannah Stryker. After moving with his mother to Indiana in his youth, Colfax founded the St. Joseph

  • Colfer, Eoin (Irish author)

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: Series: …And Another Thing…, written by Eoin Colfer, was published in 2009. The series has been widely translated and adapted for television, theatre, comics, film, and even a computer game.

  • Colgate Comedy Hour, The (American television program)

    Joel Grey: …perform on the television show The Colgate Comedy Hour (1951–54). Grey went on to perform in several such shows, and he became a nightclub performer as well. He made his film debut in the musical About Face (1952). After playing the title role in a televised play, Jack and the…

  • Colgate Total (toothpaste)

    Colgate-Palmolive Company: Colgate Total, a line of toothpaste designed to protect against a number of conditions including gingivitis, was introduced in Europe in 1992 and in the United States in 1997.

  • Colgate University (university, Hamilton, New York, United States)

    Colgate University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Hamilton, New York, U.S. The university offers a liberal arts curriculum for undergraduates and several master’s degree programs. Campus facilities include an automated observatory, the Dana Arts Center, and the Longyear

  • Colgate, William (American businessman)

    Colgate-Palmolive Company: …the early 19th century when William Colgate, a soap and candle maker, began selling his wares in New York City under the name William Colgate & Company. After his death in 1857, the company was run by his son, Samuel Colgate, under the new name Colgate & Company. In 1890…

  • Colgate-Palmolive Company (American company)

    Colgate-Palmolive Company, American diversified company that manufactures and distributes household and commercial cleaning products, dental and other personal-care products, and pet foods in the United States and in more than 200 other countries and territories worldwide. Headquarters are in New

  • coli (garment)

    dress: South Asia: …short-sleeved, breast-length blouse called a coli. The ghaghra and coli continue to be basic elements of Muslim women’s dress, the loose front panel replaced by the traditional sari, which is worn as an overgarment, one end draped around the hips, the other carried up over the shoulder or head.

  • Coliadinae (insect)

    Sulfur butterfly, (subfamily Coliadinae), any of a group of butterflies in the family Pieridae (order Lepidoptera) that are bright yellow or orange and have a wingspan of 35 to 60 mm (1.5 to 2.5 inches). Sexual and seasonal dimorphism in pattern and colour occur in many species. The pupae are

  • Colias eurytheme (insect)

    sulfur butterfly: For example, the alfalfa butterfly (Colias eurytheme) is usually orange with black wing margins, but some females are white with black margins. The larvae feed on clover and may seriously damage crops, including alfalfa and soybeans.

  • Colibri (hummingbird)

    hummingbird: In the violet-ears (Colibri) and a few others, pair bonds are formed, and both sexes assume parental duties. In the majority of other species, the male defends a territory, where he displays in flight to passing females with swoops, dashes, and sudden stops and starts. Often he…

  • colic (equine disease)

    Colic, in horses, any of a number of disease conditions that are associated with clinical signs of abdominal pain. Horses are especially susceptible to colic related to digestive tract problems, and death occurs in about 11 percent of affected animals. Signs include pawing the ground, kicking at

  • colic (human disease)

    Colic, pain produced by the contraction of the muscular walls of any hollow organ, such as the renal pelvis, the biliary tract, or the gastrointestinal tract, of which the aperture has become more or less blocked, temporarily or otherwise. In infants, usually those who are bottle-fed, intestinal

  • colicinogenic factor (biology)

    plasmid: One class of plasmids, colicinogenic (or Col ) factors, determines the production of proteins called colicins, which have antibiotic activity and can kill other bacteria. Another class of plasmids, R factors, confers upon bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Some Col factors and R factors can transfer themselves from one cell…

  • coliform (bird)

    bird: Annotated classification: Order Coliiformes (colies, or mousebirds) 6 species in 1 family of Africa south of the Sahara; soft plumage with long, pointed tails and all 4 toes directed forward; largely vegetarian, some insects; length 29–36 cm (11–14 inches). Order Struthioniformes (ostriches

  • coliform bacteria (biology)

    Coliform bacteria, microorganisms that usually occur in the intestinal tract of animals, including man, and are the most widely accepted indicators of water quality in the United States. More precisely they are evidence of recent human fecal contamination of water supplies. The coliforms are

  • Coligny, Gaspard II de, seigneur de Châtillon (French admiral and Huguenot leader)

    Gaspard II de Coligny, seigneur de Châtillon, admiral of France and leader of the Huguenots during the early years of the Wars of Religion (1562–98). Coligny was the son of Gaspard I de Coligny, the marshal of Châtillon, and Louise de Montmorency, sister of Anne de Montmorency, constable of France.

  • Coliiformes (bird)

    bird: Annotated classification: Order Coliiformes (colies, or mousebirds) 6 species in 1 family of Africa south of the Sahara; soft plumage with long, pointed tails and all 4 toes directed forward; largely vegetarian, some insects; length 29–36 cm (11–14 inches). Order Struthioniformes (ostriches

  • Colijn, Hendrikus (prime minister of the Netherlands)

    Hendrikus Colijn, Dutch statesman who as prime minister (1933–39) gained widespread popular support through his conservative antidepression economic policies. A soldier (1895–1904) in the colonial army during the Acehnese War in northern Sumatra, Colijn later served there as a civil administrator,

  • Colima (Mexico)

    Colima, city, capital of Colima estado (state), west-central Mexico. It lies along the Colima River in the northeastern part of the state, in the Sierra Madre foothills some 1,700 feet (520 metres) above sea level. Founded close to the coast in 1523 by an envoy sent by the conquistador Hernán

  • Colima (state, Mexico)

    Colima, estado (state), west-central Mexico. It is bounded by the states of Jalisco to the northwest and north and Michoacán to the east and by the Pacific Ocean to the south and west. Colima city is the state capital. Most of Colima lies on a hot, humid coastal plain, but conditions are drier and

  • Colin Clout (poem by Skelton)

    doggerel: He defended himself in Colin Clout:

  • Colin Clouts Come Home Again (poem by Spenser)

    Edmund Spenser: The Faerie Queene and last years: …episode is charmingly evoked in Colin Clouts Come Home Againe (completed 1595), which is also one of Spenser’s most effective pastoral embodiments of a provincial innocent up against the sophistications of a centre of power, with subsequent reflections on false, superficial love and the true love that finally animates a…

  • Colin Clouts Come Home Againe (poem by Spenser)

    Edmund Spenser: The Faerie Queene and last years: …episode is charmingly evoked in Colin Clouts Come Home Againe (completed 1595), which is also one of Spenser’s most effective pastoral embodiments of a provincial innocent up against the sophistications of a centre of power, with subsequent reflections on false, superficial love and the true love that finally animates a…

  • Colin Muset (French trouvère)

    Colin Muset, French trouvère, a professional vielle player and jongleur, who performed in châteaus of the Upper Marne Valley between Langres and Joinville. Colin was a native of Lorraine; his poetry, skillfully written, praised the pleasures of wine and good living. He also wrote and sometimes

  • Colin, Jean-Claude Marie (French religious leader)

    Marist Father: …by Jean-Claude Courveille and Jean-Claude-Marie Colin to undertake all ministerial works—parishes, schools, hospital chaplaincies, and the foreign missions—while stressing the virtues of the Virgin Mary. Its foreign missions, the acceptance of which was the chief reason for its approval by Rome in 1836, embrace the islands of the South Pacific…

  • colin-maillard (game)

    Blindman’s buff, children’s game played as early as 2,000 years ago in Greece. The game is variously known in Europe: Italy, mosca cieca (“blind fly”); Germany, Blindekuh (“blind cow”); Sweden, blindbock (“blind buck”); Spain, gallina ciega (“blind hen”); and France, colin-maillard (named for a

  • Colina (Brazilian militant group)

    Dilma Rousseff: Early life and political career: …associated with the militant group National Liberation Command (Comando de Libertação Nacional; Colina), and she married fellow activist Cláudio Galeno Linhares in 1968. After a raid on a Colina safe house resulted in police fatalities, the pair went into hiding in Rio de Janeiro. She and Galeno later fled Rio…

  • colinearity principle (genetics)

    Edward B. Lewis: …orderliness is known as the colinearity principle. Lewis also found that genetic regulatory functions may overlap. For example, a fly with an extra set of wings has a defective gene not in the abdominal region but in the thoracic region, which normally functions as a regulator of such mutations.

  • Colines, Simon de (French printer)

    Simon de Colines, French printer who pioneered the use of italic types in France. He worked as a partner of Henri Estienne, the founder of an important printing house in Paris. Estienne died in 1520, and Colines married his widow and was in charge of the press until Estienne’s son Robert I entered

  • Colinus virginianus (bird)

    Bobwhite, North American quail species. See

  • Colisa lalia (fish)

    gourami: 75 inches) long; the dwarf gourami (Colisa lalia), 6 cm long, brightly striped in red and blue; the kissing gourami (Helostoma temmincki), a greenish or pinkish white fish noted for its “kissing” activities; and the three-spot, or blue, gourami (Trichogaster trichopterus), a dark-spotted, silvery or blue species.

  • Coliseo (theatre, Spain)

    theatre: Developments in France and Spain: …permanent theatre in Madrid, the Coliseo, which probably had the first proscenium arch in Spain. The next decade saw a decline in both court and public theatres. By 1650 the Coliseo was reopened, but its popularity had diminished by 1700. By the late 1600s Spain had lost most of its…

  • Coliseum (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    music hall and variety: …displayed aquatic dramas, and the Coliseum presented reenactments of the Derby and chariot races of ancient Rome. These were short-lived, but other ambitious plans kept variety prosperous after the real music hall had been killed by the competition of the cinema.

  • Coliseum maple (plant)

    maple: Coliseum maple (A. cappadocicum) and Miyabe maple (A. miyabei) provide golden-yellow fall colour. The three-flowered maple (A. triflorum) and the paperbark maple (A. griseum) have tripartite leaves and attractive peeling bark, in the former tannish and in the latter copper brown.

  • colistin (drug)

    polymyxin: Only polymyxins B and E are used clinically. Their chief therapeutic use is in the treatment of infections involving gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to penicillin and other broad-spectrum antibiotics. Polymyxin B is applied topically to treat infections such as those of the eye, the ear, the skin, and…

  • colitis (pathology)

    digestive system disease: Colitis: The most common form of chronic colitis (inflammation of the colon) in the Western world, ulcerative colitis, is idiopathic (i.e., of unknown cause). Ulcerative colitis varies from a mild inflammation of the mucosa of the rectum, giving rise to excessive mucus and some spotting…

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