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  • Coia, Giacomo Antonio (Scottish architect)

    Jack Coia, Scottish architect whose work was remarkable for its uncompromising application of plain brickwork and modern styles to the design of communal buildings. Coia graduated from the Glasgow School of Architecture in 1923 and was admitted as an associate to the Royal Institute of British

  • Coia, Jack (Scottish architect)

    Jack Coia, Scottish architect whose work was remarkable for its uncompromising application of plain brickwork and modern styles to the design of communal buildings. Coia graduated from the Glasgow School of Architecture in 1923 and was admitted as an associate to the Royal Institute of British

  • Coiba Island (island, Panama)

    Coiba Island, Central American island of Panama in the Pacific Ocean. Lying 15 miles (24 km) offshore and separated from the mainland by the Gulf of Montijo on the east and the Gulf of Chiriquí on the northwest, the island measures about 20 miles from north to south and 10 miles from east to west.

  • coif (headwear)

    Coif, close-fitting cap of white linen that covered the ears and was tied with strings under the chin, like a baby’s bonnet. It appeared at the end of the 12th century as an additional head protection worn under the hood by men, and it persisted into the 16th century as ecclesiastic or legal

  • Coig (river, Argentina)

    Patagonia: Drainage and soils: …intermittent streams—such as the Shehuen, Coig, and Gallegos rivers, which have their sources east of the Andes—or contain streams like the Deseado River, which completely dry up along all or part of their courses and are so altered by the combined effect of wind and sand as to afford little…

  • Coignet, François (French house builder)

    construction: The invention of reinforced concrete: …was by the French builder François Coignet in Paris in the 1850s. Coignet’s own all-concrete house in Paris (1862), the roofs and floors reinforced with small wrought-iron I beams, still stands. But reinforced concrete development began with the French gardener Joseph Monier’s 1867 patent for large concrete flowerpots reinforced with…

  • Coihaique (Chile)

    Coihaique, city, southern archipelagic Chile. It is situated 50 miles (80 km) inland of Puerto Aisén and 25 miles (40 km) west of the Argentine border. Founded in 1912 by a small group of German colonists, it is situated among grassy steppes between the Coihaique and Simpson rivers, in a densely

  • coil (shell structure)

    gastropod: The shell: Generally, the coils, or whorls, added later in life are larger than those added when the snail is young. At the end of the last whorl is the aperture, or opening. The shell is secreted along the outer lip of the aperture by the fleshy part of the animal…

  • coil (electronics)

    Coil, in an electric circuit, one or more turns, usually roughly circular or cylindrical, of current-carrying wire designed to produce a magnetic field or to provide electrical resistance or inductance; in the latter case, a coil is also called a choke coil (see also inductance). A soft iron core

  • coil chain

    chain: …type of chain is the coil chain, which is made from straight metal bars that are bent to an oval shape, looped together, and welded shut. These bars were traditionally made of wrought iron, but chains made of steel have gained favour in recent years. This type of chain was…

  • coil drum

    copper processing: Sheet and strip: …out cold, the material being coiled on drums on each side of the rolling mills. Material produced by this method is of extremely even gauge and possesses an exceptionally good surface finish. The coils can be handled easily and are in general use for the manufacture of stampings in the…

  • coil spring

    automobile: Suspension: …of weight, are leaf springs, coil springs, torsion bars, rubber-in-shear devices, and air springs.

  • coiled ceramics

    South American forest Indian: Economic systems: …wheel was traditionally unknown, but coiled ceramics reached a high degree of development, particularly among the Arawak and Pano tribes. Among nomadic groups pottery is either nonexistent or very rudimentary; instead, the nomads use gourds, calabashes, baskets, and fibre pouches.

  • Coilia (fish genus)

    anchovy: …of anchovies of the genus Coilia, which have long anal fins and tapered bodies, are dried and eaten in China. Many species of anchovies are easily injured and are killed by contact with a net or other solid object.

  • Coilum (India)

    Kollam, port city, southern Kerala state, southwestern India. It lies on the Malabar Coast of the Arabian Sea northwest of Thiruvananthapuram, the state capital. The city is situated next to Asthamudi Lake, an inlet of the sea, and is linked with Alappuzha and Kochi (Cochin) to the north by a

  • Coimbatore (India)

    Coimbatore, city, western Tamil Nadu state, southeastern India. It is located on the Noyil River, about 25 miles (40 km) west of Tiruppur, on the road between Chennai (Madras; northeast) and Kozhikode (Calicut; southwest), Kerala state. Coimbatore was long important for its command of the Palghat

  • Coimbra (Portugal)

    Coimbra, city and concelho (municipality), west-central Portugal. It is located on the northern bank of the Mondego River. A 4th-century Latin inscription identifies Coimbra with Aeminium, and Condeixa, 8 miles (13 km) southwest, was the ancient Conimbriga or Conimbrica. Aeminium was for more than

  • Coimbra, Pedro, 1o duque de (prince and regent of Portugal)

    Pedro, 1o duque de Coimbra, second son of King John I of Portugal, younger brother of King Edward, and uncle of Edward’s son Afonso V, during whose minority he was regent. The second of the “illustrious generation,” comprising the sons of John I and Philippa of Lancaster, Pedro was present at the

  • Coimbra, University of (university, Portugal)

    Coimbra: …settled at Coimbra as the Universidade de Coimbra in 1537. Its chapel has a magnificently carved door (1517–22) and a richly decorated Baroque library (1716–23), which has 1,000,000 volumes and 3,000 manuscripts, among them a first edition of Luís de Camões’s epic Os Lusíadas (1572; “The Portuguese”). In the early…

  • coin

    Coin, a piece of metal or, rarely, some other material (such as leather or porcelain) certified by a mark or marks upon it as being of a specific intrinsic or exchange value. The use of cast-metal pieces as a medium of exchange is very ancient and probably developed out of the use in commerce of

  • Coín (Spain)

    Coín, city, Málaga provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain. It is situated near the beach resort region of Costa del Sol. The site was first settled by the Turdetanos, an Iberian tribe, and was later occupied by the Romans, who established

  • coin collecting

    Coin collecting, the systematic accumulation and study of coins, tokens, paper money, and objects of similar form and purpose. The collecting of coins is one of the oldest hobbies in the world. With the exception of China and Japan, the introduction of paper money is for the most part a recent

  • coin glass (decorative arts)

    Coin glass, glassware usually in the form of wineglasses, goblets, or tankards enclosing a coin either in the foot, or in the hollow knop of the stem, rarely in an interior bulb. A Venetian specimen of coin glass dated 1647 is known, but the principal occurrence is in English glass from about 1650

  • coinage

    Coinage, certification of a piece of metal or other material (such as leather or porcelain) as being of a specific intrinsic or exchange value. Croesus (reigned c. 560–546 bce) is generally credited with issuing the first official government coins of certified purity and weight. Counterfeiting was

  • coinche (card game)

    belote: …as belote coinchée or just coinche, that developed in the latter half of the 20th century.

  • Coincidence (and Likely Stories) (album by Sainte-Marie)

    Buffy Sainte-Marie: Later career: She released the album Coincidence (and Likely Stories) (1992), which featured the pointed political commentary “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee” as well as a new version of “Starwalker” (originally released in 1976) that incorporated samples from the Ironwood Singers, a highly regarded Northern Plains powwow drum group. She…

  • coincidence counting (physics)

    Coincidence counting, in physics, the almost simultaneous detection of two nuclear or subatomic particles (e.g., within a time of 10−5 second). Coincidence counting involves two or more particle counters exposed to the same source of particles and connected to an electronic coincidence circuit. One

  • coincidence problem (astronomy)

    dark energy: …is known as the “coincidence problem” or the “fine-tuning problem.” Understanding the nature of dark energy and its many related problems is one of the most formidable challenges in modern physics.

  • coincidence range finder (scientific instrument)

    range finder: The coincidence range finder, used chiefly in cameras and for surveying, consists of an arrangement of lenses and prisms set at each end of a tube with a single eyepiece at its centre. This instrument enables the user to sight an object by correcting the parallax…

  • coincident entity (metaphysics)

    personal identity: Coincident entities: A powerful set of criticisms, raised in the late 20th century, has to do with the intuitively plausible assumption that persons are human animals. Although (as mentioned earlier) most versions of the psychological view assume that persons are physical entities, they are committed…

  • coincident indicator (economics)

    economic indicator: …line with the overall economy (“coincident indicator”) or change direction after the economy does (“lagging indicator”). Many types of sales are examples of coincident indicators because they peak or bottom out as the economy does. Lagging indicators are useless for prediction; the value of construction completed, for example, is outdated,…

  • Coindre, André (French priest)

    André Coindre, founder of the Fratres a Sacratissimo Corde Iesu (Brothers of the Sacred Heart), a Roman Catholic religious order primarily devoted to high school and elementary school education; the brotherhood is also a missionary society. Coindre, in his formative years, witnessed the devastating

  • Coiners, The (novel by Gide)

    The Counterfeiters, novel by André Gide, published in French in 1926 as Les Faux-Monnayeurs. Constructed with a greater range and scope than his previous short fiction, The Counterfeiters is Gide’s most complex and intricately plotted work. It is a novel within a novel, concerning the relatives and

  • coining (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Forging: …special names are upsetting and coining. Coining takes its name from the final stage of forming metal coins, where the desired imprint is formed on a smooth metal disk that is pressed in a closed die. Coining involves small strains and is done cold to enhance surface definition and smoothness.…

  • Coins and Coffins (poetry by Wakoski)

    Diane Wakoski: Her collection Coins & Coffins (1962), the first of more than 60 published volumes, contains the poem “Justice Is Reason Enough,” about the suicide of an imaginary twin brother. In The George Washington Poems (1967), Wakoski addressed Washington as an archetypal figure. She dedicated The Motorcycle Betrayal…

  • coinsurance

    insurance: Limitations on amount recoverable: …less than 80 percent, a coinsurance clause is triggered, the operation of which reduces the recovery amount to the value of the loss times the ratio of the amount of insurance actually carried to the amount equal to 80 percent of the value of the property. However, the reduced recovery…

  • cointegration (economics)

    Clive W.J. Granger: …which he invented the term cointegration. Through his cointegration analysis, Granger showed that the dynamics in exchange rates and prices, for example, are driven by a tendency to smooth out deviations from the long-run equilibrium exchange rate and short-run fluctuations around the adjustment path.

  • COINTELPRO (United States government program)

    COINTELPRO, counterintelligence program conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from 1956 to 1971 to discredit and neutralize organizations considered subversive to U.S. political stability. It was covert and often used extralegal means to criminalize various forms of political

  • Coipasa Flat (salt flat, Bolivia)

    Coipasa Salt Flat, salt flat, in the arid but colourful Altiplano of Bolivia, about 100 miles (160 km) southwest of the city of Oruro, near the Chilean border. At an elevation of 12,073 feet (3,680 metres), the flat, Bolivia’s second largest (after Uyuni Salt Flat), occupies 856 square miles (2,218

  • Coipasa Salt Flat (salt flat, Bolivia)

    Coipasa Salt Flat, salt flat, in the arid but colourful Altiplano of Bolivia, about 100 miles (160 km) southwest of the city of Oruro, near the Chilean border. At an elevation of 12,073 feet (3,680 metres), the flat, Bolivia’s second largest (after Uyuni Salt Flat), occupies 856 square miles (2,218

  • Coipasa, Salar de (salt flat, Bolivia)

    Coipasa Salt Flat, salt flat, in the arid but colourful Altiplano of Bolivia, about 100 miles (160 km) southwest of the city of Oruro, near the Chilean border. At an elevation of 12,073 feet (3,680 metres), the flat, Bolivia’s second largest (after Uyuni Salt Flat), occupies 856 square miles (2,218

  • coir (plant fibre)

    Coir, seed-hair fibre obtained from the outer shell, or husk, of the coconut, the fruit of Cocos nucifera, a tropical plant of the Arecaceae (Palmae) family. The coarse, stiff, reddish brown fibre is made up of smaller threads, each about 0.01 to 0.04 inch (0.03 to 0.1 centimetre) long and 12 to

  • Coir Islands (islands, India)

    Lakshadweep: >Laccadive, Minicoy, and Amindivi Islands, union territory of India. It is a group of some three dozen islands scattered over some 30,000 square miles (78,000 square km) of the Arabian Sea off the southwestern coast of India. The principal islands in the territory are Minicoy…

  • Coira (Switzerland)

    Chur, capital, Graubünden (Grisons) canton, eastern Switzerland. It lies on the Plessur River in the Rhine Valley. The meeting point of roads from Italy over several Alpine passes, it was important in Roman times as Curia Raetorum, the centre of the Roman province of Raetia. First mentioned in 452

  • Coire (Switzerland)

    Chur, capital, Graubünden (Grisons) canton, eastern Switzerland. It lies on the Plessur River in the Rhine Valley. The meeting point of roads from Italy over several Alpine passes, it was important in Roman times as Curia Raetorum, the centre of the Roman province of Raetia. First mentioned in 452

  • Coire an Easa (poem by Mackay)

    Celtic literature: The 17th century: …Mackay (Am Pìobaire Dall), whose Coire an Easa (“The Waterfall Corrie”) was significant in the development of Gaelic nature poetry; John Macdonald (Iain Dubh Mac Iain ’Ic Ailein), who wrote popular jingles; and John Maclean (Iain Mac Ailein), who showed an interest in early Gaelic legend. Finally, bardic poetry continued…

  • Coit, Stanton (American clergyman)

    social settlement: …the West London Ethical Society, Stanton Coit, an early visitor to Toynbee Hall, established Neighborhood Guild, now University Settlement, on the Lower East Side of New York City in 1886. In Chicago in 1889, Jane Addams bought a residence on the West Side that came to be known as Hull…

  • Coiter, Volcher (Dutch physician)

    Volcher Coiter, physician who established the study of comparative osteology and first described cerebrospinal meningitis. Through a grant from Groningen he studied in Italy and France and was a pupil of Fallopius, Eustachius, Arantius, and Rondelet. He became city physician of Nürnberg (1569) and

  • coitus

    Sexual intercourse, reproductive act in which the male reproductive organ (in humans and other higher animals) enters the female reproductive tract. If the reproductive act is complete, sperm cells are passed from the male body into the female, in the process fertilizing the female’s egg and

  • coitus interruptus (contraceptive method)

    contraception: Coitus interruptus, or withdrawal of the penis before ejaculation, is one of the oldest methods, and, though it is not reliable, it is still widely practiced. Documents surviving from ancient Egypt record various methods for averting conception. The most lucid and detailed early account of…

  • coitus reservatus
  • Coix lacryma-jobi (plant)

    Job’s tears, (Coix lacryma-jobi), cereal grass of the family Poaceae, native to tropical Asia. Job’s tears receives its name from the hard shiny tear-shaped structures that enclose the seed kernels; those beadlike pseudocarps are sometimes used for jewelry and rosaries. Forms of the plant are

  • Čojbalsan (Mongolia)

    Choybalsan, town, eastern Mongolia, on the Kerulen River. First a monastic centre and later a trading town on the Siberia–China route, it was named to honour Khorloghiyin Chojbalsan, a communist hero of the 1921 Mongolian revolution. With the construction of a branch of the Trans-Siberian Railway

  • Cojedes (state, Venezuela)

    Cojedes, inland estado (state), northwestern Venezuela. It is surrounded by the states of Yaracuy and Carabobo on the north, Guárico on the east, Barinas on the south, Portuguesa on the west, and Lara on the northwest. Since colonial days, cattle raising has dominated the local economy, but plant

  • Cojuangco, Maria Corazon (president of Philippines)

    Corazon Aquino, Philippine political leader who served as the first female president (1986–92) of the Philippines, restoring democratic rule in that country after the long dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. Corazon Cojuangco was born into a wealthy, politically prominent family based in Tarlac

  • Cojutepeque (El Salvador)

    Cojutepeque, city, central El Salvador. It is located near Lake Ilopango on the Inter-American Highway (a section of the Pan-American Highway), at the northern foot of the Las Pavas Hills. Cojutepeque was a settlement for the Pipil Indians in pre-Columbian times. Founded in 1571, it was declared a

  • Coke (beverage)

    The Coca-Cola Company: …of syrup and concentrate for Coca-Cola, a sweetened carbonated beverage that is a cultural institution in the United States and a global symbol of American tastes. The company also produces and sells other soft drinks and citrus beverages. With more than 2,800 products available in more than 200 countries, Coca-Cola…

  • coke (coal product)

    Coke, solid residue remaining after certain types of bituminous coals are heated to a high temperature out of contact with air until substantially all of the volatile constituents have been driven off. The residue is chiefly carbon, with minor amounts of hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen.

  • coke breeze (metallurgy)

    iron processing: Sintering: …of fine coke (known as coke breeze) within the ore generates the necessary heat. Before being delivered to the sinter machine, the ore mixture is moistened to cause fine particles to stick to larger ones, and then the appropriate amount of coke is added. Initially, coke on the upper surface…

  • coke drum (technology)

    petroleum refining: Visbreaking, thermal cracking, and coking: …a large vessel called a coke drum for extensive and controlled cracking. The cracked lighter product rises to the top of the drum and is drawn off. It is then charged to the product fractionator for separation into naphtha, diesel oils, and heavy gas oils for further processing in the…

  • coke oven

    coal utilization: Coke ovens: Modern coke ovens can be as large as 6.5 metres (21 feet) high, 15.5 metres (50 feet) long, and 0.46 metre (1.5 feet) wide, each oven holding up to about 36 tons of coal. The coking time (i.e., between charging and discharging) is…

  • Coke’s hartebeest (mammal)

    hartebeest: One well-known variety, Coke’s hartebeest, or the kongoni (A. buselaphus cokei), of East Africa, is the plainest and smallest subspecies, measuring 117 cm (46 inches) high and weighing 142 kg (312 pounds). This subspecies is lion-coloured, with no conspicuous markings except a white rump patch; it has a…

  • Coke, John (English manufacturer)

    Pinxton porcelain: The factory was established by John Coke, who had lived in Dresden, Saxony, with the help of William Billingsley, who had worked as a painter at Derby. Billingsley remained at Pinxton until 1799, concentrating on the production of the porcelain rather than its decoration. He made a ware that contained…

  • Coke, Sir Edward (English jurist)

    Sir Edward Coke, British jurist and politician whose defense of the supremacy of the common law against Stuart claims of royal prerogative had a profound influence on the development of English law and the English constitution. Coke was educated at Norwich Grammar School and Trinity College,

  • Coke, Thomas (British clergyman)

    Thomas Coke, English clergyman, first bishop of the Methodist Church, founder of its missions, and friend of Methodism’s founder, John Wesley, who called Coke his “right hand.” Coke was ordained an Anglican priest in 1772 and served as curate at South Petherton, Somerset, from 1772 to 1776. After

  • Coker College (college, Hartsville, South Carolina, United States)

    Hartsville: …Coast Line, and eventually founded Coker College (1908). The community developed into an agricultural trade centre and acquired factories making textiles and paper and plastics and building boats. It also became noted for its production of pedigreed seeds. The Coker Experimental Farms were designated a national historic landmark in 1964.…

  • coking

    petroleum refining: Visbreaking, thermal cracking, and coking: Since World War II the demand for light products (e.g., gasoline, jet, and diesel fuels) has grown, while the requirement for heavy industrial fuel oils has declined. Furthermore, many of the new sources of crude petroleum (California, Alaska, Venezuela, and Mexico) have yielded heavier…

  • coking coal

    coal utilization: Coking coals: Although chemical composition alone cannot be used to predict whether a coal is suitable for coking, prime coking coals generally have volatile matter contents of 20 to 32 percent—i.e., the low- and medium-volatile bituminous ranks. When heated in the absence of air, these…

  • Cokwe (people)

    Chokwe, Bantu-speaking people who inhabit the southern part of Congo (Kinshasa) from the Kwango River to the Lualaba; northeastern Angola; and, since 1920, the northwestern corner of Zambia. They live in woodland savanna intersected with strips of rainforest along the rivers, swamps, and m

  • col (glacial landform)

    arête: …a low, smooth gap, or col. An arête may culminate in a high triangular peak or horn (such as the Matterhorn) formed by three or more glaciers eroding toward each other.

  • Col factor (biology)

    plasmid: One class of plasmids, colicinogenic (or Col ) factors, determines the production of proteins called colicins, which have antibiotic activity and can kill other bacteria. Another class of plasmids, R factors, confers upon bacteria resistance to antibiotics. Some Col factors and R factors can transfer themselves from one cell…

  • Cola (plant genus)

    Cola, genus of tropical trees of the chocolate family (Sterculiaceae, order Malvales) that bear fruits enclosing large kola, or cola, nuts containing caffeine, tannin, and theobromine. Though native to Africa, two species especially, Cola acuminata and C. nitida, are grown commercially in various

  • Cola acuminata (plant)

    Cola: …to Africa, two species especially, Cola acuminata and C. nitida, are grown commercially in various tropical regions around the world, the dried kola nuts being used in manufacturing the popular soft drink called cola. The cola drink consists of flavouring extracts of kola nut, spice oils, and other aromatics (and…

  • Cola di Rienzo (Italian leader)

    Cola Di Rienzo, Italian popular leader who tried to restore the greatness of ancient Rome. He later became the subject of literature and song, including a novel by the English novelist E.G.E. Bulwer-Lytton (1835) and an opera by Richard Wagner (1842), both entitled Rienzi. He was the son of a R

  • Cola dynasty (India)

    Chola dynasty, South Indian Tamil rulers of unknown antiquity, antedating the early Sangam poems (c. 200 ce). The dynasty originated in the rich Kaveri (Cauvery) River valley. Uraiyur (now Tiruchchirappalli) was its oldest capital. The legendary King Karikan was the common ancestor through whom

  • Cola nitida (plant)

    Cola: …fruits enclosing large kola, or cola, nuts containing caffeine, tannin, and theobromine. Though native to Africa, two species especially, Cola acuminata and C. nitida, are grown commercially in various tropical regions around the world, the dried kola nuts being used in manufacturing the popular soft drink called cola. The cola…

  • cola nut (plant)

    Kola nut, caffeine-containing nut of Cola acuminata and Cola nitida, trees of the cocoa family (Sterculiaceae) native to tropical Africa and cultivated extensively in the American tropics. The evergreen tree grows to 18.3 metres (60 feet) and resembles the chestnut. The 5-centimetre- (2-inch-) long

  • Colac (Victoria, Australia)

    Colac, city, southern Victoria, Australia, on the southern shore of shallow Lake Colac. It serves as a gateway to the Otway Ranges to the south and Great Otway National Park. The city’s name is of uncertain Aboriginal origin, possibly tracing to a term meaning “sand” or “freshwater lake” or to the

  • Colacium (algae genus)

    algae: Annotated classification: …approximately 1,000 described species; includes Colacium, Euglena, Eutreptiella, and Phacus. Assorted Referencesbiological development

  • Colair Lake (lake, India)

    Kolleru Lake, lake in northeastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies between the Godavari and Krishna river deltas near the city of Eluru. During the height of the summer monsoon rainy season, the lake may expand to 100 square miles (260 square km). Carp and prawns are fished

  • Colan, Gene (American comic-book artist)

    Guardians of the Galaxy: …writer Arnold Drake and artist Gene Colan. The group debuted in Marvel Super-Heroes no. 18 (January 1969).

  • Colaptes (bird)

    Flicker, any of several New World woodpeckers of the genus Colaptes, family Picidae (q.v.), that are noted for spending much time on the ground eating ants. The flicker’s sticky saliva is alkaline, perhaps to counteract the formic acid that ants secrete. Its bill is slenderer than in most

  • Colaptes auratus (bird)

    flicker: …and varied head markings—include the yellow-shafted flicker (C. auratus) of eastern North America, which has more than 100 local names. This golden-winged form, which measures about 33 cm (13 inches) in length, is replaced in the West (to Alaska) by the red-shafted flicker (C. cafer), considered by many authorities to…

  • Colaptes cafer (bird)

    flicker: …West (to Alaska) by the red-shafted flicker (C. cafer), considered by many authorities to represent the same species as the yellow-shafted because the two forms hybridize frequently. The campos, or pampas, flicker (C. campestris) and the field flicker (C. campestroides)—sometimes considered to be a single species—are common in east-central South…

  • Colaptes campestris (bird)

    flicker: The campos, or pampas, flicker (C. campestris) and the field flicker (C. campestroides)—sometimes considered to be a single species—are common in east-central South America; they are darker birds with yellow faces and breasts.

  • Colaptes campestroides (bird)

    flicker: campestris) and the field flicker (C. campestroides)—sometimes considered to be a single species—are common in east-central South America; they are darker birds with yellow faces and breasts.

  • Colas et Colinette (play by Quesnel)

    Canadian literature: After the British conquest, 1763–1830: …for amateur actors; his comedy Colas et Colinette (1808; Eng. trans. Colas et Colinette), first acted on stage in 1790, was revived as a radio play in 1968.

  • Colatina (Brazil)

    Colatina, city, central Espírito Santo estado (state), eastern Brazil, located on the Doce River about 60 miles (100 km) from its mouth on the Atlantic coast, at 131 feet (40 metres) above sea level. Given city status in 1921, Colatina is a transportation, trade, and manufacturing centre for the

  • Colavito, Rocky (American baseball player)

    Cleveland Indians: …period to the “curse of Rocky Colavito,” visited on the Indians in 1960 when the team traded Colavito, the AL’s leading home-run hitter, in 1959 to the Detroit Tigers for Harvey Kuenn, who had led the league in batting averages.

  • Colbath, Jeremiah Jones (vice president of United States)

    Henry Wilson, 18th vice president of the United States (1873–75) in the Republican administration of President Ulysses S. Grant and a national leader in the antislavery movement. Wilson was the son of Winthrop Colbath, Jr., a labourer, and Abigail Witham. Indentured as a farm labourer at age 10, he

  • Colbeck, Cape (cape, Antarctica)

    Ross Sea: …Land on the west and Cape Colbeck on Edward VII Peninsula on the east. The northern limit lies approximately along the edge of the continental shelf and the southern limit along a great barrier wall of ice marking the front of the Ross Ice Shelf.

  • Colbert Report, The (American television program)

    Television in the United States: The late shows: …another half-hour show at 11:30, The Colbert Report, which featured former Daily Show “correspondent” Stephen Colbert as the host of a parody of cable series such as The O’Reilly Factor.

  • Colbert, Claudette (American actress)

    Claudette Colbert, American stage and motion-picture actress known for her trademark bangs, her velvety purring voice, her confident intelligent style, and her subtle graceful acting. Colbert moved with her family to New York City about 1910. While studying fashion design, she landed a small role

  • Colbert, Edwin H. (American professor, curator, and paleontologist)

    Scutellosaurus: …the remains to American paleontologist E.H. Colbert at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff. In 1981 Colbert described the remains (collected by a Harvard University field party in 1977), along with a second specimen, as Scutellosaurus lawleri. The remains of six additional specimens were recovered from other Kayenta localities…

  • Colbert, Jean-Baptiste (French statesman)

    Jean-Baptiste Colbert, French statesman who served as comptroller general of finance (1665–83) and secretary of state for the navy (1668–83) under King Louis XIV of France. He carried out the program of economic reconstruction that helped make France the dominant power in Europe. Colbert was born

  • Colbert, Jean-Baptiste, marquis de Seignelay (French diplomat)

    Jean-Baptiste Colbert, marquis de Seignelay, French secretary of state under Louis XIV. As the eldest son of the famous secretary of state of that name, Colbert was given the best possible tutors, who found him bright but lazy. In 1683 Colbert became head of the navy and performed brilliantly at

  • Colbert, Jean-Baptiste, marquis de Torcy (French diplomat)

    Jean-Baptiste Colbert, marquis de Torcy, French diplomat and foreign minister who negotiated some of the most important treaties of Louis XIV’s reign. The son of Charles Colbert, minister of foreign affairs, Torcy was a brilliant student, earning a law degree (1683) at so young an age that he

  • Colbert, Stephen (American comedian)

    Stephen Colbert, American actor and comedian who was best known as the host of The Colbert Report (2005–14), an ironic send-up of television news programs, and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (2015– ). After graduating with a theatre degree (1986) from Northwestern University in Evanston,

  • Colbert, Stephen Tyrone (American comedian)

    Stephen Colbert, American actor and comedian who was best known as the host of The Colbert Report (2005–14), an ironic send-up of television news programs, and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (2015– ). After graduating with a theatre degree (1986) from Northwestern University in Evanston,

  • Colbran, Isabella (Italian opera singer)

    Gioachino Rossini: Italian period: …other than the imposing diva Isabella Colbran?

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