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  • Codex Vercellensis (Old English literature)

    Vercelli Book, Old English manuscript written in the late 10th century. It contains texts of the poem Andreas, two poems by Cynewulf, The Dream of the Rood, an “Address of the Saved Soul to the Body,” and a fragment of a homiletic poem, as well as 23 prose homilies and a prose life of St. G

  • Codex Vergilius Romanus (Roman manuscript)

    Western painting: Book illustration in antiquity: …in the second great illustrated Codex Virgilius Romanus in the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (No. 3867), written about 500, are still Roman in spirit, if less classical in style.

  • Codex Vergilius Vaticanus (Roman manuscript)

    Western painting: Book illustration in antiquity: …as do those of the Codex Virgilius Vaticanus in the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (No. 3225), written about 400. Miniatures in the second great illustrated Codex Virgilius Romanus in the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana (No. 3867), written about 500, are still Roman in spirit, if less classical in style.

  • Codex Washingtonianus (biblical manuscript)

    biblical literature: Uncials: W, Codex Washingtonianus (or Freerianus), consists of the four Gospels in the so-called Western order (Matthew, John, Luke, and Mark, as Dea). It was acquired in Egypt by C.L. Freer, an American businessman and philanthropist (hence, the Freer-Gospels), in 1906 and is now in the Freer…

  • codfish (fish, Gadus species)

    Cod, (genus Gadus), large and economically important marine fish of the family Gadidae. The species Gadus morhua is found on both sides of the North Atlantic. A cold-water fish, it generally remains near the bottom, ranging from inshore regions to deep waters. It is valued for its edible flesh, the

  • Codiaeum variegatum (plant species)

    Croton, (Codiaeum variegatum), colourful-leaved plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae). Its numerous varieties of shrubs or small trees with brilliantly coloured, glossy, leathery leaves are much grown as potted plants. Native to Malaysia and the Pacific, the trees reach a height of about 6 m (

  • codification (law)

    Law code, a more or less systematic and comprehensive written statement of laws. Law codes were compiled by the most ancient peoples. The oldest extant evidence for a code is tablets from the ancient archives of the city of Ebla (now at Tell Mardikh, Syria), which date to about 2400 bc. The best

  • coding of information (telecommunications)

    combinatorics: Orthogonal arrays and the packing problem: …in the construction of error-correcting codes. A row vector c′ is taken as a code word if and only if c′H = 0. The code words then are of length n and differ in at least t + 1 places. If t = 2u, then u or fewer errors of…

  • coding system (information processing)

    information processing: Acquisition and recording of information in digital form: …of binary digits are called coding systems, the counterpart of writing systems. A combination of three binary digits can represent up to eight such characters; one comprising four digits, up to 16 characters; and so on. The choice of a particular coding system depends on the size of the character…

  • CODIS

    police: DNA fingerprinting: The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), developed by the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI, combines computer technology with forensics, enabling investigators to compare DNA samples against a database of DNA records of convicted offenders and others. CODIS is used worldwide for sharing and comparing…

  • Codium (genus of green algae)

    Codium, genus of about 50 species of marine green algae (family Codiaceae) usually found in deep pools along rocky coasts. Essentially filamentous, the multinucleate branches are often woven together to form a velvety pseudothallus that can exceed 30 cm (11.8 inches) in length. Some species are

  • codling moth

    olethreutid moth: …examples include Cydia pomonella, the codling moth (previously Carpocapsa, or Laspeyresia, pomonella) and Cydia molesta, the Oriental fruit moth (previously Laspeyresia, or Grapholitha, molesta). Though originally from Europe, the codling moth exists wherever apples are grown. The larvae burrow in the apples and, when fully grown, emerge and pupate under…

  • codling-and-cream (plant)

    Epilobium: The hairy willow herb, or codling-and-cream (E. hirsutum), up to 2 m (6 feet) high, is similar to fireweed but has hairy leaves and stalks and notched flower petals; it is found in waste places in eastern North America. Rock fringe (E. obcordatum) is a prostrate…

  • Codman, Ernest Amory (American surgeon)

    Ernest Amory Codman, American surgeon known for pioneering the use of process-and-outcome measures, which he referred to as “end results,” to improve the quality and safety of health care. He also made significant contributions in the fields of radiology, anesthesiology, shoulder physiology and

  • Codomannus (king of Persia)

    Darius III, the last king (reigned 336–330 bc) of the Achaemenid dynasty. Darius belonged to a collateral branch of the royal family and was placed on the throne by the eunuch Bagoas, who had poisoned the two previous kings, Artaxerxes III and Arses. When Darius asserted his independence, Bagoas

  • codominance (genetics)

    allele: …traits, however, alleles may be codominant—i.e., neither acts as dominant or recessive. An example is the human ABO blood group system; persons with type AB blood have one allele for A and one for B. (Persons with neither are type O.)

  • codon (genetics)

    cell: RNA: replicated from DNA: …each nucleotide triplet (called a codon) specifies a particular amino acid. Thus, a nucleotide sequence in the DNA specifies a protein provided that a messenger RNA molecule is produced from that DNA sequence. Each region of the DNA sequence specifying a protein in this way is called a gene.

  • Codona family (circus performers)

    Codona family, a family of circus trapeze performers that became famous in the Ringling Brothers Circus. In the 1890s the Codona family owned and operated a small circus in southern Mexico. Alfredo Codona (1893–1937), who would become the most noted member of the family, began appearing in the

  • Codona, Alfredo (circus performer)

    Codona family: Alfredo Codona (1893–1937), who would become the most noted member of the family, began appearing in the circus at 7 12 months when his father, Edward, a flyer, balanced him on his hand for the opening act. In 1917, after four years with the Wirth…

  • Codona, Edward (circus performer)

    Codona family: …12 months when his father, Edward, a flyer, balanced him on his hand for the opening act. In 1917, after four years with the Wirth Brothers Circus in Australia, the Codonas joined the Siegrist-Silbon Troupe of flyers, performing in the Ringling Brothers Circus. After Edward retired, the Three Codonas act…

  • Codona, Lalo (circus performer)

    Codona family: …as flyers and their brother, Lalo, as the catcher. After Victoria quit, she was replaced by Vera Bruce.

  • Codona, Victoria (circus performer)

    Codona family: …with Alfredo and his sister, Victoria, as flyers and their brother, Lalo, as the catcher. After Victoria quit, she was replaced by Vera Bruce.

  • Codonopsis (plant)

    Campanulaceae: Codonopsis, bonnet bellflower, from Central and East Asia, is a genus of 30 to 40 mostly weak-stemmed, sprawling perennials, with long-stalked, usually blue (though sometimes white or yellowish) pendent bell-shaped flowers. C. clematidea, sprawling to about 60 cm (2 feet), has pale-blue, bonnet-shaped corollas with a…

  • codpiece (clothing)

    Codpiece, pouchlike addition to men’s long hose, located at the crotch, popular in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. It came into fashion with hose that were like tights and continued to be worn with breeches. An earlier, narrower form of codpiece, worn with a belt or a loincloth, was the

  • Codreanu, Corneliu (Romanian political agitator)

    Corneliu Codreanu, Romanian political agitator, founder and leader of the country’s principal fascist movement, the Iron Guard. Early exposed to anti-Semitism, Codreanu participated widely in anticommunist and anti-Semitic activities during his university years at Iaşi (1919–22). In 1922 he helped

  • Codreanu, Corneliu Zelea (Romanian political agitator)

    Corneliu Codreanu, Romanian political agitator, founder and leader of the country’s principal fascist movement, the Iron Guard. Early exposed to anti-Semitism, Codreanu participated widely in anticommunist and anti-Semitic activities during his university years at Iaşi (1919–22). In 1922 he helped

  • Codri Hills (mountains, Moldova)

    Moldova: Relief: …centre of the republic, the Codri Hills, lie at an average elevation of about 1,150 to 1,300 feet (350 to 400 metres), and the highest point, Mount Bălănești, in the west, reaches 1,407 feet (429 metres). These uplands are interlaced by deep, flat valleys, ravines, and landslide-scoured depressions separated by…

  • Codrington, R. H. (British anthropologist and priest)

    R.H. Codrington, Anglican priest and early anthropologist who made the first systematic study of Melanesian society and culture and whose reports of his observations remain ethnographic classics. Codrington became a fellow of Wadham College, Oxford (1855), and took holy orders in 1857. He emigrated

  • Codrington, Robert Henry (British anthropologist and priest)

    R.H. Codrington, Anglican priest and early anthropologist who made the first systematic study of Melanesian society and culture and whose reports of his observations remain ethnographic classics. Codrington became a fellow of Wadham College, Oxford (1855), and took holy orders in 1857. He emigrated

  • Codrus (king of Athens)

    Codrus, traditionally the last king of Athens, but there is some doubt as to whether he was a historical personage. According to the legend, Codrus was the son of Melanthus of Pylos, who went to Attica as a refugee from the Dorian invaders (11th century bc). By defeating the Athenians’ enemies,

  • Codsall (England, United Kingdom)

    South Staffordshire: Codsall is the administrative centre.

  • Coducci, Mauro (Italian architect)

    Western architecture: Early Renaissance in Italy (1401–95): …architects as Pietro Lombardo and Mauro Coducci. The church of Santa Maria dei Miracoli (1481–89) at Venice, with its facade faced with coloured marble, is typical of Lombardo’s work.

  • Cody (Wyoming, United States)

    Cody, city, seat (1909) of Park county, northwestern Wyoming, U.S. It lies along the Shoshone River east of the Absaroka Range, at an elevation of 5,096 feet (1,553 metres). Laid out in 1895 and developed by Colonel William F. (“Buffalo Bill”) Cody, who convinced the Burlington Railroad to extend a

  • Cody, Diablo (American writer and producer)
  • Cody, Oscar (American actor)

    Oscar Cody, (“Iron Eyes”), Native American actor who appeared in about 100 motion pictures and a number of television programs but made his greatest impact on the American public when a single tear ran down his face as he gazed upon a litter-filled and polluted landscape in a 1971 public-service TV

  • Cody, William Frederick (American showman)

    Buffalo Bill, American buffalo hunter, U.S. Army scout, Pony Express rider, Indian fighter, actor, and impresario who dramatized the facts and flavour of the American West through fiction and melodrama. His colourful Wild West show, which came to be known as Buffalo Bill’s Wild West and Congress of

  • Coe College (college, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States)

    Coe College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, U.S. It is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA), though it maintains an ecumenical outlook. Coe offers an undergraduate curriculum in the liberal arts that includes off-campus programs in Washington,

  • Coe, Douglas (American clergyman)

    The Family: …and on subsequent refinements by Douglas Coe, Vereide’s successor, and other Family leaders. Centred at The Cedars, a mansion in Arlington, Virginia, it is active throughout the world.

  • Coe, Ernest F. (American conservationist)

    Everglades: Development of the Everglades: …conservationists Marjory Stoneman Douglas and Ernest F. Coe. Government discussions on how to reverse the region’s ecological damage began in the early 1970s, initially at the state level but especially after 1990 through federal initiatives. A restoration plan, passed by the U.S. Congress in 2000, was expected to be implemented…

  • Coe, Sebastian (British athlete)

    Sebastian Coe, British athlete, who won four Olympic medals and set eight world records in middle-distance running. His great rivalry with fellow Briton Steve Ovett dominated middle-distance racing for much of the 1980s. Coe studied economics and social history at Loughborough University and won

  • Coe, Sebastian Newbold, Baron Coe of Ranmore (British athlete)

    Sebastian Coe, British athlete, who won four Olympic medals and set eight world records in middle-distance running. His great rivalry with fellow Briton Steve Ovett dominated middle-distance racing for much of the 1980s. Coe studied economics and social history at Loughborough University and won

  • Coeberger, Wensel (Flemish architect)

    Wenceslas Cobergher, Flemish architect, painter, and engraver who was a leader in the development of the Flemish Baroque style of architecture, based on the early Italian Baroque buildings of the Roman school. Cobergher received his education as a painter in the workshop of Maarten de Vos and by

  • Coecke van Aelst, Pieter (Flemish artist)

    Pieter Bruegel, the Elder: Life: …death), Bruegel was apprenticed to Pieter Coecke van Aelst, a leading Antwerp artist who had located in Brussels. The head of a large workshop, Coecke was a sculptor, architect, and designer of tapestry and stained glass who had traveled in Italy and in Turkey. Although Bruegel’s earliest surviving works show…

  • coeducation

    Coeducation, education of males and females in the same schools. A modern phenomenon, it was adopted earlier and more widely in the United States than in Europe, where tradition proved a greater obstacle. Coeducation was first introduced in western Europe after the Reformation, when certain

  • coefficient method (numeral systems)

    numerals and numeral systems: Roman numerals: …on; and (6) represents the coefficient method, “four C” meaning 400, a method often leading to forms like ijM or IIM for 2,000, as shown in (7).

  • coefficient of absorption (physics)

    absorption: …wavelength and is called its absorption coefficient.

  • coefficient of determination (statistics)

    Coefficient of determination, in statistics, R2 (or r2), a measure that assesses the ability of a model to predict or explain an outcome in the linear regression setting. More specifically, R2 indicates the proportion of the variance in the dependent variable (Y) that is predicted or explained by

  • coefficient of expansion (physics)

    telescope: Reflecting telescopes: A low coefficient of expansion means that the shape of the mirror will not change significantly as the temperature of the telescope changes during the night. Since the back of the mirror serves only to provide the desired form and physical support, it does not have to…

  • coefficient of friction (physics)

    friction: …constant ratio is called the coefficient of friction and is usually symbolized by the Greek letter mu (μ). Mathematically, μ = F/L. Because both friction and load are measured in units of force (such as pounds or newtons), the coefficient of friction is dimensionless. The value of the coefficient of…

  • coefficient of inbreeding (genetics)

    consanguinity: Inbreeding and pedigree construction: The coefficient of inbreeding (F) is used to define the probability that two alleles will be identical and derived from the same forebear. The application of this principle is most easily demonstrated by example. If a brother and sister married, their offspring would have one chance…

  • coefficient of viscosity (physics)

    fluid mechanics: Stresses in laminar motion: …for the coefficient η is shear viscosity to distinguish it from the bulk viscosity, b, which is defined below. The word shear, however, is frequently omitted in this context.

  • Coehoorn mortar (weapon)

    Menno, baron van Coehoorn: …subsequently was known as the Coehoorn mortar. His first book on siege techniques appeared in 1682 and was followed by his most important and most widely translated work, Nieuwe vestingbouw op een natte of lage horisont (1685; “New Fortress Construction in a Flat or Low Terrain”). He perfected a system…

  • Coehoorn, Menno, baron van (Dutch engineer)

    Menno, baron van Coehoorn, Dutch soldier and military engineer, a leading officer in the forces of William III, prince of Orange (William III, king of England, after 1689), and his allies in the War of the Grand Alliance (1689–97), who made a number of innovations in weaponry and siege-warfare

  • coelacanth (fish)

    Coelacanth, any of the lobe-finned bony fishes of the order Crossopterygii. Members of the related but extinct suborder Rhipidistia are considered to have been the ancestors of land vertebrates. In some systems of classification, the coelacanths and rhipidistians are considered separate orders,

  • Coelacanthiformes (fish order)

    fish: Annotated classification: (Crossopterygii) Order Coelacanthiformes (coelacanths and fossil relatives) Cranium divided into 2 parts (anterior and posterior) at region for exit of the 5th cranial nerve, these parts movable on each other; choanae (internal nares) present (lost in coelacanths); teeth labyrinthodont (that is, with complicated unfoldings of the enamel…

  • Coelacanthimorpha (fish subclass)

    fish: Annotated classification: Subclass Coelacanthimorpha (Crossopterygii) Order Coelacanthiformes (coelacanths and fossil relatives) Cranium divided into 2 parts (anterior and posterior) at region for exit of the 5th cranial nerve, these parts movable on each other; choanae (internal nares) present (lost in coelacanths); teeth labyrinthodont (that is,

  • Coelacanthus (paleontology)

    coelacanth: …of the world; the genus Coelacanthus has been found as fossils in rocks from the end of the Permian, 251 million years ago, to the end of the Jurassic, 145.5 million years ago. Coelacanthus, like other coelacanths, showed a reduction in bone ossification and a general trend toward a marine…

  • coelanaglyphic relief (sculpture)

    Intaglio, in sculpture, engraving or incised figure in stone or other hard material such that all lines appear below the surface; it is thus the opposite of relief sculpture and is sometimes called “hollow relief.” When the technique is used in casting, the design is cut in reverse into a plaster

  • Coele Syria (valley, Lebanon)

    Al-Biqāʿ, broad valley of central Lebanon, extending in a northeast-southwest direction for 75 miles (120 km) along the Līṭānī and Orontes rivers, between the Lebanon Mountains to the west and Anti-Lebanon Mountains to the east. The valley contains nearly half of Lebanon’s arable land but is not as

  • Coelenterata (invertebrate)

    Cnidarian, any member of the phylum Cnidaria (Coelenterata), a group made up of more than 9,000 living species. Mostly marine animals, the cnidarians include the corals, hydras, jellyfish, Portuguese men-of-war, sea anemones, sea pens, sea whips, and sea fans. The phylum Cnidaria is made up of four

  • coelenterate (invertebrate)

    Cnidarian, any member of the phylum Cnidaria (Coelenterata), a group made up of more than 9,000 living species. Mostly marine animals, the cnidarians include the corals, hydras, jellyfish, Portuguese men-of-war, sea anemones, sea pens, sea whips, and sea fans. The phylum Cnidaria is made up of four

  • coelenteron (cnidarian anatomy)

    circulatory system: Animals without independent vascular systems: Their fundamentally simple structure—with a gastrovascular cavity continuous with the external environmental water—allows both the endodermal and ectodermal cells of the body wall access to aerated water, permitting direct diffusion.

  • Coelho Pereira, Duarte (Portuguese donatário)

    Pernambuco: …at Olinda in 1535 by Duarte Coelho Pereira, who had been granted a captaincy extending from the mouth of the São Francisco River northward to the vicinity of modern Recife. The Dutch occupied the region from 1630 to 1654, and during their occupation a well-planned town was built where present-day…

  • Coelho, Joaquim Guilherme Gomes (Portuguese author)

    Júlio Dinis, poet, playwright, and novelist, the first great novelist of modern Portuguese middle-class society. His novels, extremely popular in his lifetime and still widely read in Portugal today, are written in a simple and direct style accessible to a large public. His first attacks of

  • Coelho, Paulo (Brazilian author)

    Paulo Coelho, Brazilian novelist known for employing rich symbolism in his depictions of the often spiritually motivated journeys taken by his characters. Coelho was raised in Rio de Janeiro. He rebelled against the conventions of his Roman Catholic upbringing and, as a result, was temporarily

  • Coelho, Pedro Passos (prime minister of Portugal)

    Aníbal Cavaco Silva: …nevertheless invited incumbent Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho to form a minority government. Opposition parties decried the move as an overstep by the president, and Passos Coelho’s government lasted just two weeks before being brought down by a vote of no confidence. Cavaco Silva was constitutionally limited to serving two…

  • coeliac disease (autoimmune digestive disorder)

    Celiac disease, an inherited autoimmune digestive disorder in which affected individuals cannot tolerate gluten, a protein constituent of wheat, barley, malt, and rye flours. General symptoms of the disease include the passage of foul pale-coloured stools (steatorrhea), progressive malnutrition,

  • Coelina, ou l’enfant du mystére (play by Pixérécourt)

    Western theatre: Melodrama: His play Coelina; ou, l’enfant du mystère (1800) was translated into English (without acknowledgement) by Thomas Holcroft as A Tale of Mystery and in 1802 became the very first melodrama to be seen in England.

  • Coello, Alonso Sánchez (Spanish painter)

    Alonso Sánchez Coello, painter who was one of the pioneers of the great tradition of Spanish portrait painting. The favourite portrait painter of King Philip II, he introduced into Spanish portraiture a specifically Spanish character that endured until Velázquez came to the court in the 1620s.

  • Coello, Antonia (American physician)

    Antonia Novello, Puerto Rican-born physician and public official, the first woman and the first Hispanic to serve as surgeon general of the United States (1990–93). Antonia Coello suffered from a painful colon condition from birth until she underwent corrective surgery at age 18. This experience

  • Coello, Claudio (Spanish painter)

    Claudio Coello, Spanish late-Baroque painter who is considered the last important master of the great Madrid school of the 17th century. Influenced both by Diego Velázquez and by Juan Carreño de Miranda, he attempted to halt the decline of Spanish art, and his work was greatly admired at the time.

  • Coelodonta antiquitatis (fossil mammal)

    woolly rhinoceros: …they have been grouped into Coelodonta antiquitatis. However, the oldest known specimen, which was found on the Plateau of Tibet in 2007 and dated to 3.6 million years ago, has been placed in C. thibetana.

  • Coelodonta thibetana (fossil mammal)

    woolly rhinoceros: …ago, has been placed in C. thibetana.

  • Coeloglossum viride (plant)

    Frog orchid, (Dactylorhiza viridis), (formerly Coeloglossum viride), small terrestrial orchid (family Orchidaceae), native to moist temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere. The flowers usually are green or brownish green, occasionally tinged with red, and are each borne with a long tapering

  • Coelogyne (plant genus)

    Coelogyne, genus of as many as 200 species of orchids (family Orchidaceae), found throughout Asia and on some Pacific islands. Coelogyne species are primarily epiphytic. Some live on rocks, soil, or dead trees. A number of species grow well in cool climates, and some are cultivated. All members of

  • Coelogyne cristata (plant)

    Coelogyne: C. cristata, native to the Himalayas, has a beautiful white flower with golden hairs on its crested lip. Somewhat similar in appearance is C. flaccida, which can produce numerous inflorescences of attractive white or tawny flowers with a yellow lip. The black orchid (C. pandurata)…

  • Coelogyne pandurata (plant)
  • coelom (biology)

    prenatal development: Coelom: The lateral mesoderm, beyond the somites and nephrotomes, splits into two layers: the somatic layer and, underlying the somatic layer, the splanchnic layer. The intervening space is the coelom. As the embryo’s body folds off, its coelom becomes a single closed cavity. In it…

  • coelomate (zoology)

    animal: Coelomates: The advantage of a true coelom is the ability of the inner mesenteric (mostly connective tissue) layer to suspend the central gut in the middle of the animal. Otherwise, in those animals with a body cavity used in locomotion, gravity would pull the gut…

  • coelomic fluid (zoology)

    annelid: Tissues and fluids: The coelomic fluid of annelids plays a role in many important functions—e.g., locomotion and regulation of fluid transfer through the body wall (osmoregulation). Many metabolic processes occur in the coelom, which also serves as a site for temporary food storage, for excretion of nitrogen-containing wastes, and…

  • coelomic sac (anatomy)

    excretion: The coxal glands of aquatic arthropods: …as a small sac, the coelomic sac, which opens into a wider region, the labyrinth, having complex infoldings of its walls. The labyrinth opens either directly into the bladder, as in marine lobsters and crabs, or into a narrow part of the tubule, the canal, which in turn opens into…

  • Coelomys (rodent subgenus)

    mouse: Geographic distribution and habitat: …five species in the subgenus Coelomys are restricted to tropical evergreen lowland and mountain forests of Sri Lanka, southern India, mainland Southeast Asia, Sumatra, and Java. Beneath the forest understory, they live in moist or cool environments, often near streams and other water sources, or in wet, mossy habitats at…

  • Coelophysis (dinosaur genus)

    Coelophysis, (genus Coelophysis), small carnivorous dinosaurs found as fossils from the Late Triassic Period (228 million to 200 million years ago) of North America. Coelophysis was a primitive theropod dinosaur. Usually growing to length of about 2 metres (6.6 feet), it was very light, weighing

  • coelostat (astronomical instrument)

    Coelostat, device consisting of a flat mirror that is turned slowly by a motor to reflect a portion of the sky continuously into a fixed telescope. The mirror is mounted to rotate about an axis through its front surface that points to a celestial pole and is driven at the rate of one revolution in

  • Coelum Britannicum (masque by Carew)

    Thomas Carew: Carew’s only masque, Coelum Britannicum, was performed by the king and his gentlemen in 1634 and published the same year. Music for it was composed by Henry Lawes, who, among others, set some of Carew’s songs to music.

  • coelurosaur (dinosaur)

    dinosaur: Tetanurae: The coelurosaurs (“hollow-tailed reptiles”) include generally small to medium-size theropods, though the recent inclusion of tyrannosaurs would seem to discount this generalization. Coelurosauria is defined as birds and all tetanurans more closely related to birds than to the carnosaurs. The first known members, including birds, appear…

  • Coelurosauria (dinosaur)

    dinosaur: Tetanurae: The coelurosaurs (“hollow-tailed reptiles”) include generally small to medium-size theropods, though the recent inclusion of tyrannosaurs would seem to discount this generalization. Coelurosauria is defined as birds and all tetanurans more closely related to birds than to the carnosaurs. The first known members, including birds, appear…

  • Coelurus (dinosaur genus)

    Ornitholestes: …authorities have equated Ornitholestes and Coelurus, but they appear to be separate genera.

  • Coemgenus (patron of Dublin)

    Saint Kevin, ; feast day June 3), one of the patron saints of Dublin, founder of the monastery of Glendalough. The earliest life (10th/11th century?) states that Kevin was born into the royal line of the ancient Irish kingdom of Leinster and chose as a young man to become a hermit in Glendalough,

  • coemptio (Roman law)

    marriage law: Coemptio, used by many plebeians, was effectively marriage by purchase, while usus, the most informal variety, was marriage simply by mutual consent and evidence of extended cohabitation. Roman law generally placed the woman under the control of her husband and on the same footing as…

  • Coen brothers (American filmmakers)

    Coen brothers, American filmmakers known for their stylish films that combine elements of comedy and drama and often centre on eccentric characters and convoluted plots. Though both brothers contributed to all phases of the filmmaking process, Joel Coen (b. November 29, 1955, St. Louis Park,

  • Coen, Ethan (American filmmaker)

    Coen brothers: …credited as the director, and Ethan Coen (b. September 21, 1958, St. Louis Park) was nominally the producer, with the brothers sharing screenwriting credit and using the pseudonym “Roderick Jaynes” for editing.

  • Coen, Giuliana (Italian fashion designer and executive)

    Giuliana Coen, (Giuliana Coen Camerino), Italian fashion designer and executive (born Dec. 8, 1920, Venice, Italy—died May 10, 2010, Venice), created handbags—many made of lush, vibrantly coloured textiles rather than the more traditional leather—that became fashion status symbols among celebrities

  • Coen, Jan Pieterszoon (Dutch merchant and statesman)

    Jan Pieterszoon Coen, chief founder of the Dutch commercial empire in the East Indies. As the fourth governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, he established a chain of fortified posts in the Indonesian Archipelago, displacing the Portuguese and preventing penetration by the English. His dream of

  • Coen, Joel (American filmmaker)

    Coen brothers: …phases of the filmmaking process, Joel Coen (b. November 29, 1955, St. Louis Park, Minnesota, U.S.) was usually solely credited as the director, and Ethan Coen (b. September 21, 1958, St. Louis Park) was nominally the producer, with the brothers sharing screenwriting credit and using the pseudonym “Roderick Jaynes” for…

  • coenecium (zoology)

    pterobranch: …a colonial structure called a coenecium. The third genus, Atubaria, lives on hydroids. All three genera are rare. About 21 species have been described.

  • coenobia (biology)

    protist: Features unique to protists: …manifest as filaments, colonies, or coenobia (a type of colony with a fixed number of interconnected cells embedded in a common matrix before release from the parental colony). Not all protists are microscopic. Some groups have large species indeed; for example, among the brown algal protists some forms may reach…

  • Coenobita (crustacean genus)

    hermit crab: Semiterrestrial, tropical species of Coenobita inhabit sections of bamboo stems, broken coconut shells, and other articles, in addition to seashells. Pylocheles, a deepwater crab of the Indian Ocean, lives in bamboo sections; Xylopargus, found in West Indian waters at depths of 180 to 360 metres (600 to 1,200 feet),…

  • Coenobitidae (crab family)

    crab: Distribution and variety: …hermit crabs of the family Coenobitidae live on land, often at considerable distances from the sea, to which they must return to release their larvae. The large robber, or coconut, crab (another anomuran) of the Indo-Pacific islands (Birgus latro) has given up the habit of carrying a portable dwelling, and…

  • coenocytic cell (botany)

    fungus: Structure of the thallus: , coenocytic) hyphae the nuclei are scattered throughout the cytoplasm. In septate hyphae each cell may contain one to many nuclei, depending on the type of fungus or the stage of hyphal development. The cells of fungi are similar in structure to those of many other…

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