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  • cockatiel (bird)

    Cockatiel, Crested, small, gray Australian parrot (Nymphicus hollandicus). It has a yellow head, red ear patches, and a heavy beak used to crack nuts. The cockatiel is in the same family (Cacatuidae) as the larger cockatoo. About 13 in. (32 cm) long, the cockatiel lives in open areas and eats grass

  • cockatoo (bird)

    Cockatoo, (family Cacatuidae), any of the 21 species of crested parrots (order Psittaciformes) found in Australia as well as in New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Most are white with touches of red or yellow; some are black. All have a massive scimitar-like beak for cracking nuts, digging up

  • Cockatoo Island (island, Western Australia, Australia)

    Buccaneer Archipelago: …but the most important are Cockatoo and Koolan, where rich iron-ore deposits were discovered about 1880 and were mined during the second half of the 20th century. Named for the numerous white cockatoos found there, Cockatoo Island, 12 square miles (31 square km) in area, rises from coastal cliffs to…

  • cockatrice (mythological creature)

    Cockatrice, in the legends of Hellenistic and Roman times, a small serpent, possibly the Egyptian cobra, known as a basilikos (“kinglet”) and credited with powers of destroying all animal and vegetable life by its mere look or breath. Only the weasel, which secreted a venom deadly to the

  • Cockayne (imaginary country)

    Cockaigne, imaginary land of extreme luxury and ease where physical comforts and pleasures are always immediately at hand. References to Cockaigne are especially prominent in medieval European lore. These accounts describe rivers of wine, houses built of cake and barley sugar, streets paved with p

  • Cockburn Harbour (Turks and Caicos Islands)

    Cockburn Harbour, port on South Caicos Island, part of the British overseas territory of the Turks and Caicos Islands, in the West Indies north of Hispaniola. Historic buildings, including the old Wesleyan Church, are located in the southeastern part of the town. The settlement dates from 1850,

  • Cockburn Sound (inlet, Western Australia, Australia)

    Cockburn Sound, inlet of the Indian Ocean, southwestern Western Australia. The inlet extends 14 miles (23 km) south from the mouth of the Swan River to Point Peron. An important part of Fremantle’s outer harbour, it is 3–6 miles (5–9 km) wide and is bounded on the east by the mainland and on the

  • Cockburn Town (Turks and Caicos Islands)

    Cockburn Town, town and seat of government of the Turks and Caicos Islands, West Indies. Cockburn Town is on the west coast of Grand Turk Island, about 20 miles (32 km) directly across a channel (Turks Island Passage) from the port of Cockburn Harbour on South Caicos Island. Cockburn Town has

  • Cockburn, Alexander (Irish American journalist)

    Alexander Claud Cockburn, Irish American journalist (born June 6, 1941, Ardgay, Scot.—died July 21, 2012, Bad Salzhausen, Ger.), penned acerbic, provocative columns on cultural and political topics for a variety of publications, notably the left-leaning journals the Village Voice (1973–84) and The

  • Cockburn, Alexander Claud (Irish American journalist)

    Alexander Claud Cockburn, Irish American journalist (born June 6, 1941, Ardgay, Scot.—died July 21, 2012, Bad Salzhausen, Ger.), penned acerbic, provocative columns on cultural and political topics for a variety of publications, notably the left-leaning journals the Village Voice (1973–84) and The

  • Cockburn, Alicia (Scottish author)

    Alicia Cockburn, Scottish author who wrote the original version of the popular ballad “Flowers of the Forest.” Her lyrics beginning “I’ve seen the smiling of Fortune beguiling,” set to the old air of “Flowers of the Forest,” were probably written before 1731, although they were not published until

  • Cockburn, Alison (Scottish author)

    Alicia Cockburn, Scottish author who wrote the original version of the popular ballad “Flowers of the Forest.” Her lyrics beginning “I’ve seen the smiling of Fortune beguiling,” set to the old air of “Flowers of the Forest,” were probably written before 1731, although they were not published until

  • Cockburn, Bruce (Canadian musician)

    Bruce Cockburn, Canadian singer, songwriter, guitarist, and activist best known for music blending folk, rock, pop, and jazz and for lyrics that typically addressed spiritual themes and global issues from a politically charged perspective. Often considered a “songwriter’s songwriter,” Cockburn’s

  • Cockburn, James (Canadian politician and lawyer)

    James Cockburn, politician and lawyer who was Canada’s first Speaker of the House of Commons. His participation in the Québec Conference of 1864 made him one of the Fathers of Confederation. Cockburn was the son of a merchant. When his family immigrated to Lower Canada in 1832, his father settled

  • Cockburn, Sir Alexander James Edmund, 10th Baronet (British chief justice)

    Sir Alexander James Edmund Cockburn, 10th Baronet, lord chief justice of the Court of Queen’s Bench from June 24, 1859, and lord chief justice of England from 1874 until his death. He was the first to be legally styled lord chief justice of England, a title used informally by lord chief justices of

  • cockchafer (insect)

    Cockchafer, (Melolontha melolontha), a large European beetle that is destructive to foliage, flowers, and fruit as an adult and to plant roots as a larva. In the British Isles, the name “cockchafer” refers more broadly to any of the beetles in the subfamily Melolonthinae (family Scarabaeidae),

  • cockchafer (insect)

    Chafer, (subfamily Melolonthinae), any of a group of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae (insect order Coleoptera). Adult leaf chafers (Macrodactylus) eat foliage, whereas grubs feed underground on plant roots. The adult female deposits her eggs in the soil, and the larvae live underground for two

  • Cockcroft, Sir John Douglas (British physicist)

    Sir John Douglas Cockcroft, British physicist, joint winner, with Ernest T.S. Walton of Ireland, of the 1951 Nobel Prize for Physics for pioneering the use of particle accelerators in studying the atomic nucleus. Educated at the University of Manchester and St. John’s College, Cambridge, Cockcroft

  • Cockcroft-Walton generator (voltage multiplier)

    Sir John Douglas Cockcroft: …he and Walton designed the Cockcroft-Walton generator and used it to disintegrate lithium atoms by bombarding them with protons. This type of accelerator proved to be one of the most useful in the world’s laboratories. They conducted further research on the splitting of other atoms and established the importance of…

  • Cocke, John (American mathematician and computer scientist)

    John Cocke, American mathematician and computer scientist and winner of the 1984 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for “significant contributions in the design and theory of compilers, the architecture of large systems and the development of reduced instruction set

  • cocked hat (bowling)

    Cocked hat, bowling game played on a standard tenpin lane with three tenpins and a duckpin ball (4–5 inches [10–12.5 cm] in diameter). The pins are set 36 inches apart at the three corners of a normal tenpin formation. Two balls are allowed per frame, and scoring is as in tenpin bowling, except

  • cocker spaniel (type of dog)

    Cocker spaniel, either of two breeds of sporting dogs used by hunters to flush game birds from cover; it is also trained to retrieve. “Cocker” likely refers to its use in flushing woodcocks. Spaniel ancestors have been known since the 14th century, gradually differentiated into land, water, and toy

  • cocker spaniel, American (dog)

    cocker spaniel: The American cocker spaniel is a small dog standing 14 to 15 inches (36 to 38 cm) and weighing 22 to 29 pounds (10 to 13 kg). Compact and sturdily built, it has a rounded head, floppy ears, and a soft, flat or wavy coat. The…

  • cocker spaniel, English (breed of dog)

    cocker spaniel: The English cocker spaniel is similar to the American cocker spaniel but is larger and has longer legs and a longer muzzle. It stands 15 to 17 inches (38 to 43 cm) and weighs 26 to 34 pounds (12 to 15 kg). It has a medium-length,…

  • Cocker’s Arithmetic (book by Cocker)

    Edward Cocker: ), reputed English author of Cocker’s Arithmetic, a famous textbook, the popularity of which gave rise to the phrase “according to Cocker,” meaning “quite correct.”

  • Cocker, Edward (English mathematician)

    Edward Cocker, reputed English author of Cocker’s Arithmetic, a famous textbook, the popularity of which gave rise to the phrase “according to Cocker,” meaning “quite correct.” Cocker worked very skillfully as an engraver and is mentioned favourably in Samuel Pepys’ Diary. His other works include

  • Cocker, Joe (British singer)

    Joe Cocker, (John Robert Cocker), British blues-rock singer (born May 20, 1944, Sheffield, Eng.—died Dec. 22, 2014, Crawford, Colo.), was a raspy-voiced singer who over a more-than-five-decade career made nearly 40 albums and became one of the most-distinctive singers of his generation with his

  • Cocker, John Robert (British singer)

    Joe Cocker, (John Robert Cocker), British blues-rock singer (born May 20, 1944, Sheffield, Eng.—died Dec. 22, 2014, Crawford, Colo.), was a raspy-voiced singer who over a more-than-five-decade career made nearly 40 albums and became one of the most-distinctive singers of his generation with his

  • Cockeram, Henry (English lexicographer)

    dictionary: From 1604 to 1828: …next work, in 1623, by Henry Cockeram, the first to have the word dictionary in its title: The English Dictionary; or, An Interpreter of Hard English Words. It added many words that have never appeared anywhere else—adpugne, adstupiate, bulbitate, catillate, fraxate, nixious, prodigity, vitulate, and so on. Much fuller than…

  • cockerel (bird)

    chicken: Natural history: Males (called cocks or roosters) and females (hens) are known for their fleshy combs, lobed wattles hanging below the bill, and high-arched tails. In some roosters, the tail can extend more than 30 cm (12 inches) in length.

  • Cockerell, Charles Robert (British architect)

    Western architecture: Great Britain: The architect Charles Robert Cockerell, despite being a distinguished Classical archaeologist, regarded this rigid Greek formula as stylistically restricting. He felt that he belonged to a continuing Classical tradition that linked ancient Greek architect Ictinus with Baroque architect Francesco Borromini. In his masterpiece, the Ashmolean Museum and…

  • Cockerell, Sir Christopher (British inventor)

    Sir Christopher Sydney Cockerell, British engineer who invented the Hovercraft; he began testing his ideas for a vehicle that moved atop a cushion of air in 1955; his first Hovercraft prototype, the SR.N1, was launched in the spring of 1959 and only weeks later crossed the English Channel in 20

  • Cockerell, Sir Sydney Carlyle (British publisher)

    Edward Johnston: Through Lethaby, Johnston had met Sydney Cockerell, a former secretary and librarian to the English designer William Morris, who had directed his attention to certain manuscripts in the British Museum. Encouraged by Cockerell, Johnston rediscovered the techniques for making and using reeds and quills.

  • Cockerill Mechanical Industries (Belgian company)

    Seraing: …now houses the offices of Cockerill Mechanical Industries, part of Cockerill Sambre SA. An old Cistercian abbey located at the edge of the town is now the Val Saint-Lambert glassworks, one of the largest in Europe. There are several other historic castles in Seraing. Pop. (2006 est.) 60,740.

  • Cockerill Sambre SA (Belgian company)

    Seraing: …now houses the offices of Cockerill Mechanical Industries, part of Cockerill Sambre SA. An old Cistercian abbey located at the edge of the town is now the Val Saint-Lambert glassworks, one of the largest in Europe. There are several other historic castles in Seraing. Pop. (2006 est.) 60,740.

  • Cockerill, John (British manufacturer)

    Industrial Revolution: The first Industrial Revolution: Two Englishmen, William and John Cockerill, brought the Industrial Revolution to Belgium by developing machine shops at Liège (c. 1807), and Belgium became the first country in continental Europe to be transformed economically. Like its British progenitor, the Belgian Industrial Revolution centred in iron, coal, and textiles.

  • Cockerill, William (British inventor)

    William Cockerill, English inventor and manufacturer who brought the Industrial Revolution to present-day Belgium. As a youth in England Cockerill revealed unusual mechanical ability by constructing models of a great number of machines. In 1794 he went to Russia as an artisan and two years later to

  • Cockerill-Ougrée Company (Belgian company)

    Seraing: …now houses the offices of Cockerill Mechanical Industries, part of Cockerill Sambre SA. An old Cistercian abbey located at the edge of the town is now the Val Saint-Lambert glassworks, one of the largest in Europe. There are several other historic castles in Seraing. Pop. (2006 est.) 60,740.

  • Cockermouth (England, United Kingdom)

    Cockermouth, town (parish), Allerdale district, administrative county of Cumbria, historic county of Cumberland, northwestern England. It is situated where the River Derwent emerges from the mountains of the scenic Lake District and is joined by the River Cocker. The community grew under the

  • cockfighting (spectacle)

    Cockfighting, the sport of pitting gamecocks to fight and the breeding and training of them for that purpose. The game fowl is probably the nearest to the Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), from which all domestic chickens are believed to be descended. The sport was popular in ancient times in

  • cockfighting chair (furniture)

    Cockfighting chair, chair with broad armrests that form a yoke with the back rail, to which a reading desk is attached. Broad in front but curving inward toward the back, the seat was shaped so that a reader could easily sit astride, facing the desk at the back of the chair and resting his arms on

  • cockle (mollusk)

    Cockle, any of the approximately 250 species of marine bivalve mollusks, or clams, of the family Cardiidae. Distributed worldwide, they range from about one centimetre (0.4 inch) in diameter to about 15 centimetres (about 6 inches)—the size of the smooth giant cockle (Laevicardium elatum) of

  • cocklebur (plant)

    Cocklebur, weedy annual plant of the genus Xanthium of the family Asteraceae, distributed throughout much of Europe and parts of North America. Some authorities consider that the genus contains about 15 species, others say from 2 to 4. All species have round, short clusters of male flowers, above

  • Cockleshell Heroes (British special-operations force)

    Special Boat Service: …six two-man teams—the famous “Cockleshell Heroes”—set out to canoe 100 km (60 miles) up the Gironde River to attack cargo ships in the French port of Bordeaux.

  • Cockney (dialect)

    Cockney, dialect of the English language traditionally spoken by working-class Londoners. Cockney is also often used to refer to anyone from London—in particular, from its East End. The word Cockney has had a pejorative connotation, originally deriving from cokenay, or cokeney, a late Middle

  • cockneyism (literature)

    Cockneyism, the writing or the qualities of the writing of the 19th-century English authors John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, William Hazlitt, and Leigh Hunt. The term was used disparagingly by some contemporaries, especially the Scottish critic John Lockhart, in reference to the fact that these

  • cockpit

    airplane: …crew, passengers, and cargo; the cockpit is the area from which the pilot operates the controls and instruments to fly the plane.

  • Cockpit Country (region, Jamaica)

    Cockpit Country, an approximately 500-square-mile (1,300-square-kilometre) region in the interior of Jamaica, southeast of Montego Bay. It is part of the great White Limestone plateau and has typical karst topography, with innumerable conical and hemispherical hills covered with dense scrubby

  • cockpit voice recorder (aviation device)

    flight recorder: …data recorder (FDR) and the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), though sometimes these two devices are packaged together in one combined unit. The FDR records many variables, not only basic aircraft conditions such as airspeed, altitude, heading, vertical acceleration, and pitch but hundreds of individual instrument readings and internal environmental conditions.…

  • Cockpit, The (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    The Cockpit, private playhouse located in Drury Lane, London. Built in 1609 for cockfighting, the small, tiered building was converted into a theatre in 1616 by Christopher Beeston. The following year, however, it was burned down by rioters. The theatre was rebuilt in 1618 and given the name the

  • Cockrell, Zac (American musician)

    Alabama Shakes: October 2, 1988), bass player Zac Cockrell (b. February 16, 1988), drummer Steve Johnson (b. April 19, 1985), and guitarist Heath Fogg (b. August 10, 1984).

  • cockroach (insect)

    Cockroach, (order Blattodea), any of about 4,600 species of insects that are among the most primitive living winged insects, appearing today much like they do in fossils that are more than 320 million years old. The word cockroach is a corruption of the Spanish cucaracha. The cockroach is

  • Cockroach, The (novella by McEwan)

    Ian McEwan: Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, the novella The Cockroach (2019) concerns Brexit (the British exit from the European Union).

  • Cocks, Clifford (British mathematician and cryptographer)

    public-key cryptography: …been discovered by James Ellis, Clifford Cocks, and Malcolm Williamson at the British Government Code Headquarters (GCHQ).

  • cockscomb (plant)

    Cockscomb, (Celosia cristata), common garden plant of the amaranth family (Amaranthaceae). Cockscombs are tender perennials but are usually grown as annuals in cooler climates. The plants produce dense undulating inflorescences that resemble the red combs on the heads of roosters, hence their

  • Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary (Belize)

    Cockscomb Range: The Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary at the eastern end of the range occupies about 150 square miles (390 square km) and has a sizable population of jaguars.

  • cockscomb pyrites (mineral)

    Marcasite, an iron sulfide mineral that forms pale bronze-yellow orthorhombic crystals, usually twinned to characteristic cockscomb or sheaflike shapes; the names spear pyrites and cockscomb pyrites refer to the shape and colour of these crystals. Radially arranged fibres are also common.

  • Cockscomb Range (mountains, Belize)

    Cockscomb Range, mountain chain in central Belize (formerly British Honduras), a spur of the Maya Mountains, extending east–west for about 10 miles (16 km). The highest elevation is Victoria Peak (3,681 feet [1,122 m]), near Dangriga (formerly Stann Creek). The mountains have stands of timber

  • cocksfoot grass (plant)

    Orchard grass, (Dactylis glomerata), perennial pasture, hay, and forage grass of the family Poaceae. Orchard grass is native to temperate Eurasia and North Africa and is widely cultivated throughout the world. It has naturalized in many places and is considered an invasive species in some areas

  • cockspur grass (plant)

    Barnyard grass, (Echinochloa crus-galli), coarse tufted grass of the family Poaceae, a noxious agricultural weed. Although native to tropical Asia, barnyard grass can be found throughout the world, thriving in moist cultivated and waste areas. In many areas outside its native range, however, it is

  • cockspur hawthorn (plant)

    hawthorn: Common species: …thorned American species is the cockspur hawthorn (C. crus-galli), with extremely long, slender thorns up to 8 cm (3 inches) long; a thornless variety is also available. The Washington hawthorn (C. phaenopyrum) is famous for its red autumn colour and its abundant clusters of orange-red fruits that persist on the…

  • Cockspur Island (island, Georgia, United States)

    Cockspur Island, island, Chatham county, southeastern Georgia, U.S., in the mouth of the Savannah River. Known during colonial times as Peeper Island, it was given the name Cockspur for the shape of its reef. Its strategic advantages were early recognized; in the 18th century the island held Fort

  • Cocksucker Blues (film by Frank [1972])

    Robert Frank: …subsequent works was the documentary Cocksucker Blues (1972), about the Rolling Stones’ 1972 American tour.

  • cocktail party effect (physiology)

    human ear: Analysis of sound by the auditory nervous system: …is one aspect of the “cocktail party effect,” whereby a listener with normal hearing can attend to different conversations in turn or concentrate on one speaker despite the surrounding babble. Whether the muscles within the ear play a part in filtering out unwanted sounds during such selective listening has not…

  • Cocktail Party, The (play by Eliot)

    The Cocktail Party, verse drama in three acts by T.S. Eliot, produced at the Edinburgh Festival in August in 1949 and published in 1950. Based on Alcestis by Euripides, it is a morality play presented as a comedy of manners. Eliot’s most commercially successful play, it was more conventional and

  • Cocktail Waitress, The (novel by Cain)

    James M. Cain: The Cocktail Waitress, compiled from a number of manuscripts, was published in 2012. The novel chronicles the vicissitudes of a young widow who becomes entangled with two men she meets while working as a server at a high-end lounge.

  • Coclé (region, Panama)

    jewelry: Central and South American: pre-Columbian: …of the Andes region, the Coclé region in Panama was strongly influenced by the Quimbaya style. It is particularly known for its striking gold pieces set with precious stones, including emeralds, quartzes, jaspers, opals, agates, and green serpentines.

  • Coco (film by Unkrich [2017])

    Gael García Bernal: …voice to the animated film Coco (2017), about a boy who goes on a journey through the Land of the Dead to uncover his family’s long-kept secret. His roles from 2018 included a poetry instructor in The Kindergarten Teacher, an artless thief who breaks into Mexico City’s National Museum of…

  • Coco avant Chanel (film by Fontaine [2009])

    Audrey Tautou: …biopic Coco avant Chanel (Coco Before Chanel). She evinced a widow who is drawn out of mourning by an oafish coworker in La Délicatesse (2011; Delicacy) and played the murderous title heroine in Thérèse Desqueyroux (2012; Thérèse), director Claude Miller’s adaptation of the François Mauriac novel (1927) of the…

  • Coco Before Chanel (film by Fontaine [2009])

    Audrey Tautou: …biopic Coco avant Chanel (Coco Before Chanel). She evinced a widow who is drawn out of mourning by an oafish coworker in La Délicatesse (2011; Delicacy) and played the murderous title heroine in Thérèse Desqueyroux (2012; Thérèse), director Claude Miller’s adaptation of the François Mauriac novel (1927) of the…

  • coco de mer (plant)

    Coco de mer, (Lodoicea maldivica), native palm of the Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean. The flowers are borne in enormous fleshy spadices (spikes), the male and female on distinct plants. Coco de mer fruits, among the largest known, take about 10 years to ripen; they have a fleshy and fibrous

  • coco plum (plant)

    Coco plum, (species Chrysobalanus icaco), evergreen tree, in the family Chrysobalanaceae, native to tropical America and Africa. The tree, up to 9 m (30 feet) tall, has roundish shiny green leaves and clusters of white flowers. The fruit, up to 4 cm (1.5 inches) long, is a pulpy drupe, sweet but

  • coco plum family (plant family)

    Malpighiales: The Chrysobalanaceae group: In Chrysobalanaceae, Balanopaceae, Trigoniaceae, Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae, each ovary chamber usually has only two ovules, and the seeds have at most slight endosperm. Within this group, Chrysobalanaceae, Trigoniaceae, Dichapetalaceae, and Euphroniaceae are especially close. All have leaf margins that lack teeth; there are often flat, rarely…

  • Coco River (river, Central America)

    Coco River, river in southern Honduras and northern Nicaragua, rising west of the town of San Marcos de Colón, in southern Honduras, near the Honduras-Nicaragua border. The Coco flows generally eastward into Nicaragua, then turns northward near Mount Kilambé. For much of its middle and lower c

  • Coco, Isla del (island, Costa Rica)

    Cocos Island, island of volcanic origin lying in the Pacific Ocean, about 300 miles (480 km) south of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. It rises to an elevation of about 2,800 feet (850 metres) above sea level, is about 5 miles (8 km) long and 3 miles (5 km) wide, and has a total area of 9 square

  • Coco, Vincenzo (Italian historian)

    Vincenzo Cuoco, Italian historian noted for his history of the Neapolitan Revolution of 1799. At the age of 17, Cuoco went to Naples to study law and became a partisan of the French Jacobins when the French Revolution broke out in 1789. After taking an active part in the revolution of the Kingdom

  • cocoa (tree)

    Cacao, (Theobroma cacao), tropical evergreen tree (family Malvaceae) grown for its edible seeds, whose scientific name means “food of the gods” in Greek. Native to lowland rainforests of the Amazon and Orinoco river basins, cacao is grown commercially in the New World tropics as well as western

  • cocoa (food)

    Cocoa, highly concentrated powder made from chocolate liquor—a paste prepared from cocoa beans, the fruit of the cacao—and used in beverages and as a flavouring ingredient. Cocoa is the key ingredient in chocolate and chocolate confections. The cocoa bean is the seed of the cacao tree (Theobroma

  • Cocoa (Florida, United States)

    Cocoa-Rockledge: adjoining cities, Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S., on the Indian River (lagoon; part of the Intracoastal Waterway), about 45 miles (70 km) southeast of Orlando. They are linked to Merritt Island, Cape Canaveral, and the city of Cocoa Beach by causeways across the Indian and…

  • Cocoa Beach (Florida, United States)

    Cocoa Beach, city, Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S., on a barrier island between the Banana River (lagoon) and the Atlantic Ocean, just south of Cape Canaveral and near Patrick Air Force Base, about 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Orlando. Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León visited Cape

  • cocoa bean (fruit)

    cocoa: …chocolate liquor—a paste prepared from cocoa beans, the fruit of the cacao—and used in beverages and as a flavouring ingredient. Cocoa is the key ingredient in chocolate and chocolate confections.

  • cocoa butter (food)

    Cocoa butter, pale-yellow, edible vegetable fat obtained from cocoa beans, having a mild chocolate flavour and aroma, and used in the manufacture of chocolate confections, pharmaceutical ointments, and toiletries. It is valued for its melting characteristics, remaining brittle at room temperature

  • cocoa mass (food)

    chocolate: …Sons combined cocoa butter with chocolate liquor and sugar to produce sweet (eating) chocolate—the base of most chocolate confectionary—and in 1876 Daniel Peter of Switzerland added dried milk to make milk chocolate. The proliferation of flavoured, solid, and coated chocolate foods rapidly followed.

  • cocoa powder (gunpowder)

    naval ship: Armament: About 1880 brown or cocoa powder appeared, employing incompletely charred wood. It burned slower than black powder and hence furnished a sustained burning that was effective ballistically but did not create excessive pressures within the gun barrel. To take advantage of this for longer-range firing, gun-barrel lengths jumped to…

  • cocoa powder (food)

    Cocoa, highly concentrated powder made from chocolate liquor—a paste prepared from cocoa beans, the fruit of the cacao—and used in beverages and as a flavouring ingredient. Cocoa is the key ingredient in chocolate and chocolate confections. The cocoa bean is the seed of the cacao tree (Theobroma

  • Cocoa-Rockledge (adjoining cities, Florida, United States)

    Cocoa-Rockledge, adjoining cities, Brevard county, east-central Florida, U.S., on the Indian River (lagoon; part of the Intracoastal Waterway), about 45 miles (70 km) southeast of Orlando. They are linked to Merritt Island, Cape Canaveral, and the city of Cocoa Beach by causeways across the Indian

  • Cocoanut Grove Fire (conflagration, Boston, Massachusetts, United States [1942])

    Cocoanut Grove Fire, one of the deadliest fires in American history that led to significant improvements in safety laws. WHEN: November 28, 1942 WHERE: Cocoanut Grove nightclub , Piedmont Street, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. DEATH TOLL: 492 dead, including a honeymoon couple, all four servicemen

  • Cocody (Côte d’Ivoire)

    Côte d'Ivoire: Urban environment: …small bay east of Abidjan, Cocody grew up in isolation as an area of expensive housing (including the presidential tower mansion) with two hotel complexes and a tourist centre.

  • COCOMS (United States military)

    Unified Command Plan: …joint commands are known as Combatant Commands (COCOMS) and receive their missions, planning, training, and operational responsibilities from the UCP.

  • coconscious (psychology)

    Morton Prince: …of psychological behaviour, and the coconscious, a parallel, possibly rival, well-organized system of awareness comparable to the ordinary, familiar consciousness.

  • Coconuco (people)

    Coconuco, Indian people of what is now the southern Colombian highlands at the time of the Spanish conquest, related to the modern Páez Indians. The Coconuco language is now extinct; the culture and tribal structure have also disappeared, although some Coconuco place-names and family names remain.

  • coconut (fruit)

    Coconut, fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), a tree of the palm family (Arecaceae). Coconuts probably originated somewhere in Indo-Malaya and are one of the most important crops of the tropics. Coconut flesh is high in fat and can be dried or eaten fresh. The liquid of the nut is used in

  • coconut crab (crustacean)

    Coconut crab, (Birgus latro), large nocturnal land crab of the southwest Pacific and Indian oceans. It is closely related to the hermit crab and king crab. All are decapod crustaceans (order Decapoda, class Crustacea). Adult coconut crabs are about 1 metre (40 inches) from leg tip to leg tip and

  • coconut milk (beverage)

    coconut: Uses: …mixed with water to make coconut milk, used in cooking and as a substitute for cow’s milk. The dry husk yields coir, a fibre highly resistant to salt water and used in the manufacture of ropes, mats, baskets, brushes, and brooms.

  • coconut moth (insect)

    tachinid fly: …sphenophori from New Guinea; the coconut moth in Fiji has been controlled by the Malayan tachinid Ptychomyia remota; and Centeter cinerea was transplanted to the United States to check the destructive Japanese beetle. The caterpillars of the armyworm may be up to 90 percent infested by larvae of the red-tailed…

  • coconut oil

    carboxylic acid: Saturated aliphatic acids: …is the main acid in coconut oil (45–50 percent) and palm kernel oil (45–55 percent). Nutmeg butter is rich in myristic acid (C14), which constitutes 60–75 percent of the fatty-acid content. Palmitic acid (C16) constitutes between 20 and 30 percent of most animal fats and is also an important constituent…

  • coconut palm (tree)

    angiosperm: Mechanisms of dispersal: …for this reason, coconuts (Cocos nucifera; Arecaceae) are readily transported across oceans to neighbouring islands. Adaptations for water dispersal include aerenchyma in fruits or seeds and light weight (e.g., water chestnut, Trapa natans; Lythraceae).

  • cocoon (biology)

    Cocoon, a case produced in the larval stage of certain animals (e.g., butterflies, moths, leeches, earthworms, Turbellaria) for the resting pupal stage (see pupa) in the life cycle. Certain spiders spin a fibrous mass, or cocoon, to cover their

  • Cocoon (film by Howard [1985])

    Brian Dennehy: Park (1983), Silverado (1985), Cocoon (1985), F/X (1986), Legal Eagles (1986), and Presumed Innocent (1990).

  • Cocopa (people)

    northern Mexican Indian: A small number of Cocopa in the Colorado River delta in like manner represent a southward extension of Colorado River Yumans from the U.S. Southwest. The remaining group is the Seri, who are found along the desert coast of north-central Sonora. This much-studied group is probably related to now-extinct…

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