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  • Chung Mong Hun (South Korean businessman)

    Chung Mong Hun, South Korean businessman (born 1948, Seoul, S.Kor.—died Aug. 4, 2003, Seoul), used his position as chairman of Hyundai Asan (part of the Hyundai conglomerate founded by his father) to push for reconciliation between North and South Korea, but he became embroiled in scandal after it

  • Chung Mong-Joon (South Korean businessman and politician)

    Chung Mong-Joon, South Korean businessman, politician, and sports official who was involved in various ventures related to the Hyundai Group, which was founded by his father, Chung Ju-Yung, and became one of South Korea’s largest chaebols. Chung attended the prestigious Seoul National University,

  • Chung Se Yung (Korean industrialist)

    Chung Se Yung, (“Pony Chung”), Korean industrialist (born Aug. 6, 1928, T’ongch’on, Kangwon province, Korea [now N.Kor.]—died May 21, 2005, Seoul, S.Kor.), served (1967–96) as chairman of the Hyundai Motor Co., which under Chung’s leadership grew into one of the world’s largest automobile m

  • Chung Sŭng-Hwa (South Korean general)

    Chung Sŭng-Hwa, Korean general and army chief of staff who was implicated in the October 1979 assassination of South Korean Pres. Park Chung-Hee. During the Korean War (1950–53), Chung helped defend Taegu (Daegu) against a North Korean assault. In 1961 he was made a brigadier general, and he built

  • chung-ch’ao (Chinese history)

    Zhongchao, (Chinese: “inner court”) in imperial China (mainly during the Han dynasty), the group of advisers and attendants (often extended family members and eunuchs) with direct access to the emperor. The inner court’s authority was established during the Han (206 bce–220 ce), when it was

  • Chung-chia (people)

    Buyei, an official minority group inhabiting large parts of Guizhou province in south-central China. They call themselves Jui or Yoi. There are also some 50,000 Buyei living in Vietnam, where they are an official nationality. They had no written script of their own until 1956, when the Chinese

  • Chung-ho tien (hall, Beijing, China)

    Beijing: Public and commercial buildings: …beyond another courtyard, is the Hall of Central (or Complete) Harmony (Zhonghedian), where the emperor paused to rest before going into the Hall of Supreme Harmony. Beyond the Hall of Central Harmony is the last hall, the Hall of Preserving Harmony (Baohedian), after which comes the Inner Court (Neiting). The…

  • Chung-hsing Hsin-ts’un (Taiwan)

    Chung-hsing Hsin-ts’un, (Chinese: “Chung-hsing New Village”), town, Nan-t’ou shih (municipality), Nan-t’ou hsien (county), west-central Taiwan, and, since 1958, the administrative seat of the Taiwan Provincial Government. It is situated in a fertile plain just west of the Chung-yang Mountain Range;

  • Chung-hua

    China, country of East Asia. It is the largest of all Asian countries and has the largest population of any country in the world. Occupying nearly the entire East Asian landmass, it covers approximately one-fourteenth of the land area of Earth. Among the major countries of the world, China is

  • Chung-hua Jen-min Kung-ho-kuo

    China, country of East Asia. It is the largest of all Asian countries and has the largest population of any country in the world. Occupying nearly the entire East Asian landmass, it covers approximately one-fourteenth of the land area of Earth. Among the major countries of the world, China is

  • Chung-hua Min-kuo (self-governing island, Asia)

    Taiwan, island in the western Pacific Ocean that lies roughly 100 miles (160 km) off the coast of southeastern China. It is approximately 245 miles (395 km) long (north-south) and 90 miles (145 km) across at its widest point. Taipei, in the north, is the seat of government of the Republic of China

  • Chung-kuo

    China, country of East Asia. It is the largest of all Asian countries and has the largest population of any country in the world. Occupying nearly the entire East Asian landmass, it covers approximately one-fourteenth of the land area of Earth. Among the major countries of the world, China is

  • Chung-kuo Kung-ch’an Tang (political party, China)

    Chinese Communist Party (CCP), political party of China. Since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, the CCP has been in sole control of that country’s government. The CCP was founded as both a political party and a revolutionary movement in 1921 by revolutionaries such as Li

  • Chung-kuo Kuo-chia Po-wu-kuan (museum, Beijing, China)

    National Museum of China, museum in Beijing, located on the east side of Tiananmen Square. The museum was created in 2003 by the merger of the National Museum of Chinese History and the Museum of the Chinese Revolution. It is the largest museum in China and one of the largest museums in the world.

  • Chung-kuo Ying-tsao Hsüeh-she (Chinese architectural society)

    Chinese architecture: The influence of foreign styles: In 1930 they founded Zhongguo Yingzao Xueshe (“The Society for the Study of Chinese Architecture”). The following year Liang Sicheng joined the group; he would be the dominant figure in the movement for the next 30 years. The fruits of these architects’ work can be seen in new universities…

  • Chung-li (Taiwan)

    Chung-li, shih (municipality), T’ao-yüan hsien (county), northwestern Taiwan, about 5 miles (8 km) southwest of T’ao-yüan city, in the northern coastal uplands. Situated on the left (western) bank of Hsin-chieh River, Chung-li flourished in the late 17th century as the collecting centre for a

  • Chung-li Ch’üan (Chinese religious figure)

    Zhongli Quan, in Chinese religion, one of the Baxian, the Eight Immortals of Daoism. He is a wine-drinking recluse in quest of immortality and often depicted as a potbellied, bearded old man holding a fan with a tassel of horse hairs. Occasionally he is depicted as a military man and is credited

  • Chung-ni (Chinese philosopher)

    Confucius, China’s most famous teacher, philosopher, and political theorist, whose ideas have influenced the civilization of East Asia. Confucius’s life, in contrast to his tremendous importance, seems starkly undramatic, or, as a Chinese expression has it, it seems “plain and real.” The plainness

  • Chung-shan (China)

    Zhongshan, city in southern Guangdong sheng (province), southern China. Located in the south-central part of the Pearl (Zhu) River Delta, Zhongshan has a network of waterways connecting it with all parts of the delta and is on an express highway running north to Guangzhou (Canton) and south to

  • Chung-tu (national capital, China)

    Beijing, city, province-level shi (municipality), and capital of the People’s Republic of China. Few cities in the world have served for so long as the political headquarters and cultural centre of an area as immense as China. The city has been an integral part of China’s history over the past

  • Chung-yang Range (mountains, Taiwan)

    Chung-yang Range, mountain group, eastern Taiwan. It trends north-south and consists of three main ranges (respectively, from east to west): the Chung-yang Range, Yü Mountains, and A-li Mountains. The Chung-yang Range traverses the length of the island, extending about 170 miles (270 km) in length

  • Chung-yang Shan-mo (mountains, Taiwan)

    Chung-yang Range, mountain group, eastern Taiwan. It trends north-south and consists of three main ranges (respectively, from east to west): the Chung-yang Range, Yü Mountains, and A-li Mountains. The Chung-yang Range traverses the length of the island, extending about 170 miles (270 km) in length

  • Chung-yung (Confucian text)

    Zhongyong, (Chinese: “Centre” and “Unchangeable” or “Doctrine of the Mean”) one of four Confucian texts that, when published together in 1190 by the Neo-Confucian philosopher Zhu Xi, became the famous Sishu (“Four Books”). Zhu chose Zhongyong for its metaphysical interest, which had already

  • Chunga burmeisteri (bird)

    seriema: …black-legged, or Burmeister’s, seriema (Chunga burmeisteri), sometimes called gray seriema, which inhabits wooded areas, is darker and grayer, with a shorter crest and shorter legs.

  • Chungch’ujŏl (Korean holiday)

    Ch’usŏk, Korean holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month to commemorate the fall harvest and to honour one’s ancestors. Similar to Thanksgiving Day in the United States, the Harvest Moon Festival, as it is also known, is one of the most popular holidays in Korea. The day begins

  • Chungch’uwŏn (Korean administrative body)

    Korea: Social structure and culture: …Three Chancelleries (Samsŏng) and the Royal Secretariat (Chungch’uwŏn). These two formed the Supreme Council of State. Koryŏ politics was thus centred in the aristocratic council. Officials above the fifth grade were given land for permanent possession. Even the land supposed to be returned was actually handed down for generations because…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do (province, South Korea)

    North Ch’ungch’ŏng, do (province), central South Korea. The only province of South Korea with no seacoast, it is bordered by the provinces of Kangwŏn (Gangwon; north), North Kyŏngsang (Gyeongsang; east), North Chŏlla (Jeolla; southwest), South Ch’ungch’ŏng (west), and Kyŏnggi (Gyeonggi; northwest).

  • Chungcheongnam-do (province, South Korea)

    South Ch’ungch’ŏng, do (province), west-central South Korea. Facing the Yellow Sea to the west, it is bounded on the north by Kyŏnggi (Gyeonggi) province, on the east by North Ch’ungch’ŏng province, and on the south by North Chŏlla (Jeolla) province. Taejŏn (Daejeon)—administratively designated a

  • chunggoje (Korean music)

    p'ansori: Styles and schools of performance: …sŏp’yŏnje (“west-side singing school”), and chunggoje (“middle-high singing school”). Tongp’yŏnje is associated with the eastern Chŏlla region (in southwestern South Korea) and particularly with the singers Song Hŭngnok, Chong Ch’unp’ung, and Kim Sejong. Hallmarks of the style include a deep controlled voice that is projected directly from the abdomen, an…

  • Chunghing Samlam (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1994])

    Wong Kar-Wai: …Wong shot Chunghing Samlam (1994; Chungking Express), which presents a pair of unrelated stories of unrequited love and missed romantic connections involving two policemen. Wong’s synthesis of the freedom of the French New Wave, the vigour of Hong Kong genre cinema, and the modernity of music videos brought him international…

  • Chunghwa Telecom (Taiwanese company)

    Taiwan: Transportation and telecommunications: Chunghwa Telecom, the majority of which was government-owned until 2005, is the largest telecommunications company. It commands a sizeable share of Taiwan’s fixed-line, mobile, and broadband markets. Internet use grew rapidly in Taiwan after its introduction, and broadband became widely available.

  • Chungichnich (American Indian culture)

    Native American literature: California: …California, in ceremonies of the Chungichnich cults, contact with the highest god is achieved by smoking datura or jimsonweed, which produces hallucinations of animals. The boys initiated into the cults regard the animals as their guardian spirits. This concept relates the cult activity with the most fundamental feature of American…

  • Chungju (South Korea)

    Ch’ungju, city, North Ch’ungch’ŏng (Chungcheong) do (province), central South Korea. Connected with Seoul by water transport on the Han River, it was the administrative and economic centre of the province until the provincial government was removed to Ch’ŏngju (Cheongju) in 1909. Although

  • Chungking (China)

    Chongqing, city (shi) and provincial-level municipality (zhixiashi), southwest-central China. The leading river port, transportation hub, and commercial and industrial centre of the upper Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) basin, the city is located some 1,400 miles (2,250 km) from the sea, at the

  • Chungking Express (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1994])

    Wong Kar-Wai: …Wong shot Chunghing Samlam (1994; Chungking Express), which presents a pair of unrelated stories of unrequited love and missed romantic connections involving two policemen. Wong’s synthesis of the freedom of the French New Wave, the vigour of Hong Kong genre cinema, and the modernity of music videos brought him international…

  • Chungnim Kohoe (Korean literary group)

    Korean literature: Later Koryŏ: 12th century to 1392: …and the group known as Chungnim Kohoe (“Eminent Assembly in the Bamboo Grove”), which was established by O Se-Jae, Yi Il-Lo, Yi Kyu-Bo, and others. This group was integral to the emergence and proliferation of literary criticism during this period. Yi Il-Lo, in his P’ahan chip (1260; “Jottings to Break…

  • Chungwong chasit (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1997])

    Wong Kar-Wai: Chungwong chasit (1997; Happy Together) was filmed in Buenos Aires and was initially conceived as an adaptation of Manuel Puig’s detective novel The Buenos Aires Affair (1973). Happy Together chronicles the disintegrating love affair between two Hong Kong expatriates. Wong’s work on the film won him the award…

  • Chunibert of Cologne (Frankish bishop)

    Sigebert III: …first by his regents, Bishop Chunibert of Cologne and Duke Adalgisil; then, on Dagobert’s death, by Chunibert and Pippin I, the mayor of the palace (d. 640); and finally by Pippin’s son, Grimoald, mayor of the palace from 642 or 643 until the king’s death.

  • Chunichi Dragons (Japanese baseball team)

    Central League: The league consists of the Chūnichi Dragons, Hanshin Tigers, Hiroshima Tōyō Carp, Tokyo Yakult Swallows, Yokohama BayStars, and Yomiuri (Tokyo) Giants. The regular playing season culminates in the Japan Series, a seven-game series between the respective champion teams of the Pacific and Central leagues.

  • Chunjie (festival)

    Lunar New Year, festival typically celebrated in China and other Asian countries that begins with the first new moon of the lunar calendar and ends on the first full moon of the lunar calendar, 15 days later. The lunar calendar is based on the cycles of the moon, so the dates of the holiday vary

  • chunking (mnemonic method)

    mnemonic: Later developments: Another method, chunking, involves grouping individual pieces of information in a manner that makes them easier to remember (i.e., relation, hierarchical importance, function, and so on). For example, the individual digits 1, 9, 6, and 1 may be easier to remember as the year 1961; the digits…

  • Chunnel (tunnel, Europe)

    Channel Tunnel, rail tunnel between England and France that runs beneath the English Channel. The Channel Tunnel, 31 miles (50 km) long, consists of three tunnels: two for rail traffic and a central tunnel for services and security. The tunnel runs between Folkestone, England, and Sangatte (near

  • chuño (food)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The cold as a resource: Chuño is the name popularly used for processed tubers, but a rich vocabulary for tubers exists in the Quechuan (Andean) languages: there is a separate term for each plant and for each mode of preparation. Chuño cannot be made where a diurnal temperature extreme is…

  • Chunom (Vietnamese writing system)

    Nguyen Du: …Kim van Kieu, written in chu-nom (southern characters). He is considered by some to be the father of Vietnamese literature.

  • Chunqiu (Confucian text)

    Chunqiu, (Chinese: “Spring and Autumn [Annals]”) the first Chinese chronological history, said to be the traditional history of the vassal state of Lu, as revised by Confucius. It is one of the Five Classics (Wujing) of Confucianism. The name, actually an abbreviation of “Spring, Summer, Autumn,

  • Chunqiu fanlu (work by Dong)

    Dong Zhongshu: Dong’s Chunqiu fanlu (“Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals”) is one of the most important philosophical works of the Han period. In it, Dong interpreted the Confucian Classic “Spring and Autumn Annals” (Chunqiu), a chronicle of the events in Confucius’s native state of Lu…

  • Chunqiu Shidai (Chinese history)

    Spring and Autumn Period, (770–476 bc), in Chinese history, the period during the Zhou dynasty (1046–256 bc)—specifically the first portion of the Dong (Eastern) Zhou—when many vassal states fought and competed for supremacy. It was named for the title of a Confucian book of chronicles, Chunqiu,

  • Chuntaramurtti (Hindu poet and musician)

    Nayanar: the poets Nanachampantar, Appar, and Chuntaramurtti (often called “the three”) are worshipped as saints through their images in South Indian temples. The Nayanars were approximately contemporary with their Vaishnavite (Vishnu-worshipping) counterparts, the Alvars. In the 10th century Nambi Andar Nambi collected the hymns of the Nayanars in an anthology called…

  • Chūō-Ōdōri (street, Ōsaka, Japan)

    Ōsaka-Kōbe metropolitan area: Street patterns: The east-west axis is Chūō Ōdōri (“Central Boulevard”), running from the Central Pier of the Port of Ōsaka in the west to the foot of the Ikoma Mountains in the east. Parallel to Midō-suji is the narrow Shinsaibashi-suji, the central shopping district. Dotombori, at the south end of Shinsaibashi-suji,…

  • Chuŏr Phnum Dâmrei (mountains, Cambodia)

    Dâmrei Mountains, north-south-trending range of high hills, an offshoot of the Krâvanh Mountains, southwestern Cambodia. Extending 70 miles (110 km) north from the Gulf of Thailand, they reach a high point in the Bok Koŭ ridge at Mount Bokor (3,547 feet [1,081 m]). The densely wooded hills receive

  • Chuŏr Phnum Dângrêk (mountains, East Asia)

    Dângrêk Mountains, forested range of hills averaging 1,500–2,000 feet (450–600 m) and dividing Thailand from Cambodia. This east–west-trending range extends from the Mekong River westward for approximately 200 miles (320 km), merging with the highland area near San Kamphaeng, Thailand. Essentially

  • Chuŏr Phnum Krâvanh (mountains, Cambodia)

    Krâvanh Mountains, range of high hills in southwestern Cambodia that is situated on a southeast-northwest axis and continues westward into the highland area around Chanthaburi, Thailand. The Krâvanh Mountains extend (some discontinuously) for about 100 miles (160 km) southeast and east to the

  • chupacabra (legendary creature)

    Chupacabra, in Latin American popular legend, a monstrous creature that attacks animals and consumes their blood. The name is derived from the Spanish words chupar (“to suck”) and cabra (“goat”). As a fearsome but probably nonexistent creature, the chupacabra has been characterized as the southern

  • chupamiel (plant)

    salvia: …most spectacular of which is Wagner’s salvia (S. wagneri), or chupamiel, a treelike shrub, native near the mountain lakes of Guatemala. It attains more than 4 metres (13 feet) in height and has triangular 30-cm (12-inch) spikes of woolly scarlet corollas opening from magenta calyxes. Blue sage (S. farinacea) opens…

  • Chūpānid (Mongol dynasty)

    Iraq: Īl-Khanid successors (1335–1410): …especially the leaders of the Süldüz and Jalāyirid tribes. The Süldüz, also known as the Chūpānids, made Azerbaijan their stronghold, while the Jalāyirid took control in Baghdad. At first both groups raised a succession of Īl-Khanid figureheads to legitimize their rule.

  • chuppah (Judaism)

    Ḥuppa, in a Jewish wedding, the portable canopy beneath which the couple stands while the ceremony is performed. Depending on the local custom and the preference of the bride and groom, the ḥuppa may be a simple Jewish prayer shawl (ṭallit) suspended from four poles, a richly embroidered cloth of

  • Chuquet, Nicolas (French mathematician)

    algebra: Commerce and abacists in the European Renaissance: …the first French algebra text, Nicolas Chuquet’s Triparty en la science des nombres (1484; “The Science of Numbers in Three Parts”). As part of a discussion on how to use the Hindu-Arabic numerals, Triparty contained relatively complicated symbolic expressions, such as R214pR2180 (meaning:

  • Chuquicamata (mining centre, Chile)

    Chuquicamata, mining and smelting centre, northern Chile. It lies near Calama at 9,350 feet (2,850 metres) above sea level and is the largest open-pit mine in the world. Large-scale operations started in 1915. Tapping one of the world’s largest-known copper deposits, it produces more than

  • Chuquisaca (national constitutional capital, Bolivia)

    Sucre, judicial capital of Bolivia. (La Paz is the country’s administrative capital.) Sucre lies in a fertile valley crossed by the Cachimayo River, at an elevation of 9,153 feet (2,790 metres) above sea level. It was founded in 1539 by the conquistador Pedro de Anzúrez on the site of a Charcas

  • Chuquitanta (archaeological site, Peru)

    El Paraíso, Late Preceramic site in the present-day Chillón Valley on the central Peruvian coast, generally believed to date just before the beginning of the Initial Period (c. 2100–1800 bc). It is notable for its large mud and rock apartment-like dwelling units. It is believed to be roughly c

  • Chur (Switzerland)

    Chur, capital, Graubünden (Grisons) canton, eastern Switzerland. It lies on the Plessur River in the Rhine Valley. The meeting point of roads from Italy over several Alpine passes, it was important in Roman times as Curia Raetorum, the centre of the Roman province of Raetia. First mentioned in 452

  • church (Christian community)

    Church, in Christian doctrine, the Christian religious community as a whole, or a body or organization of Christian believers. The Greek word ekklēsia, which came to mean church, was originally applied in the Classical period to an official assembly of citizens. In the Septuagint (Greek)

  • church (architecture)

    Church, in architecture, a building designed for Christian worship. The earliest churches were based on the plan of the pagan Roman basilica (q.v.), or hall of justice. The plan generally included a nave (q.v.), or hall, with a flat timber roof, in which the crowd gathered; one or two side aisles

  • church and state

    Church and state, the concept, largely Christian, that the religious and political powers in society are clearly distinct, though both claim the people’s loyalty. A brief treatment of church and state follows. For full treatment, see Christianity: Church and state. Before the advent of

  • Church Army (British religious organization)

    Church Army, organization of lay evangelists within the Church of England, founded on the model of the Salvation Army for evangelistic purposes in the slums of London in 1882 by Wilson Carlile. Later it became primarily concerned with social work and rehabilitation. After a two-year residential

  • Church at Corinth, Letter to the (work by Clement I)

    First Letter of Clement, a letter to the Christian Church in Corinth from the church of Rome, traditionally ascribed to and almost certainly written by St. Clement I of Rome, c. ad 96. It is extant in a 2nd-century Latin translation, which is possibly the oldest surviving Latin Christian work.

  • Church Building Act (United Kingdom [1832])

    Western architecture: From the 19th to the early 20th century: The Church Building Act of 1818, providing for the expenditure of £1,000,000 on churches, emphasized Gothic as the ecclesiastical style. The commissioners responsible for the spending of this money (together with an additional £500,000 voted in 1824) discovered that a Gothic church cost less to build…

  • Church Buttes (cliffs, Wyoming, United States)

    Church Buttes, eroded sandstone cliffs in Uinta county, extreme southwestern Wyoming, about 45 miles (72 km) west-southwest of Rock Springs. Named by Mormon pioneers for their steeple-like needles, the buttes rise 75 feet (23 metres) above the surrounding hills, to an elevation of 6,351 feet (1,936

  • Church Commissioners (organization, Church of England)

    Church Commissioners, in the Church of England, organization established by vote of the church’s national assembly in 1947 that joined two corporations, Queen Anne’s Bounty and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners (the actual merger took place in 1948); it helps with the expenses of poor parishes. The

  • Church Committee (United States history)

    COINTELPRO: Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, commonly referred to as the “Church Committee,” for its chairman, Senator Frank Church of Idaho. However, millions of pages of documents remain unreleased, and many released documents are heavily censored. In its final report,…

  • Church Disestablishment Act (United Kingdom [1914])

    Wales: Political radicalism: …Education Act (1889) and the Church Disestablishment Act (1914), was a parliamentary success matched in cultural life by the founding of three university colleges and the federal University of Wales and the securing of a royal charter for the establishment of the National Library of Wales and the National Museum…

  • Church Dogmatics (work by Barth)

    Karl Barth: Church Dogmatics: …massive study Kirchliche Dogmatik (1932–67; Church Dogmatics), a remarkable contribution to 20th-century theology. Church Dogmatics grew year by year out of his class lectures; though incomplete, it eventually filled four volumes in 12 parts, of which Barth regarded volume 2, parts 1 and 2, which are devoted to the doctrine…

  • Church Father (Christianity)

    Church Father, any of the great bishops and other eminent Christian teachers of the early centuries whose writings remained as a court of appeal for their successors, especially in reference to controverted points of faith or practice. See patristic

  • Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples (American religious organization)

    Howard Thurman: …Howard to help found the Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples (also known as Fellowship Church) in San Francisco, the first congregation in the United States that encouraged participation in its spiritual life regardless of religious or ethnic background. Thurman stayed there until 1953, when he assumed the deanship…

  • Church Missionary Society (Anglican organization)

    Church Missionary Society (CMS), society founded in London in 1799 as the Society for Missions in Africa and the East, by Evangelical clergy of the Church of England (those who stressed biblical faith, personal conversion, and piety). In 1812 it was renamed the Church Missionary Society for Africa

  • Church Missionary Society for Africa and the East (Anglican organization)

    Church Missionary Society (CMS), society founded in London in 1799 as the Society for Missions in Africa and the East, by Evangelical clergy of the Church of England (those who stressed biblical faith, personal conversion, and piety). In 1812 it was renamed the Church Missionary Society for Africa

  • church mode (music)

    Church mode, in music, any one of eight scalar arrangements of whole and half tones, derived by medieval theorists, most likely from early Christian vocal convention. The Eastern church was doubtless influenced by ancient Hebrew modal music. Its basic chant formulas were codified as early as the

  • church music

    Liturgical music, music written for performance in a religious rite of worship. The term is most commonly associated with the Christian tradition. Developing from the musical practices of the Jewish synagogues, which allowed the cantor an improvised charismatic song, early Christian services

  • Church of Christ (American Protestantism)

    Church of Christ, any of several conservative Protestant churches, found chiefly in the United States. They are strongest in parts of the Midwest and in the western and southern parts of the country. Each church is known locally as a Church of Christ and its members as Christians, and each church

  • Church of Christ, Scientist (religious denomination)

    Christian Science, religious denomination founded in the United States in 1879 by Mary Baker Eddy (1821–1910), author of the book that contains the definitive statement of its teaching, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (1875). It is widely known for its highly controversial practice of

  • Church of Corinth, Letter to the (work by Clement I)

    First Letter of Clement, a letter to the Christian Church in Corinth from the church of Rome, traditionally ascribed to and almost certainly written by St. Clement I of Rome, c. ad 96. It is extant in a 2nd-century Latin translation, which is possibly the oldest surviving Latin Christian work.

  • Church of France (French Protestant denomination)

    Reformed Church of France, church organized in 1938 by merging several Reformed churches that had developed in France during and after the 16th-century Protestant Reformation. During the early part of the Reformation, Protestant movements made slow progress in France. Yet reforming movements within

  • Church of Jesus Christ Christian (American hate group)

    Aryan Nations, prominent Christian Identity-based hate group founded in the United States in the 1970s. In the 1970s and ’80s the Aryan Nations developed a strong network comprising neo-Nazi, skinhead, Ku Klux Klan (KKK), white supremacist, and militia groups, many of which congregated and

  • Church of Saint Charles Borromeo (church, Vienna, Austria)

    Vienna: Layout and architecture: The Church of St. Charles, a vast structure dedicated to St. Charles Borromeo, was erected just outside the city walls in 1716–39. This Baroque edifice is fronted by a severely classical porch of columns in ancient Roman style, and before it stand spirally decorated twin columns…

  • Church of Scientology (international movement)

    Scientology, international movement that emerged in the 1950s in response to the thought of L. Ron Hubbard (in full Lafayette Ronald Hubbard; b. March 13, 1911, Tilden, Nebraska, U.S.—d. January 24, 1986, San Luis Obispo, California), a writer who introduced his ideas to the general public in

  • Church of Scientology International (American organization)

    Scientology: Organization of the church: …churches and organizations is the Church of Scientology International (CSI), which coordinates the activities of the movement and promotes the church internationally. The Religious Technology Center (RTC) has ultimate ecclesiastical authority for the teachings of Scientology, owns all the movement’s trademarks, and grants the churches and organizations their licenses. The…

  • church order (religion)

    Eastern Orthodoxy: The episcopate: …theology also emphasizes that the office of bishop is the highest among the sacramental ministries and that there is therefore no divinely established authority over that of the bishop in his own community, or diocese. Neither the local churches nor the bishops, however, can or should live in isolation. The…

  • church parish (Louisiana government)

    Louisiana: Constitutional framework: The parish (county), the municipality, and the special district are the units of local government. There are 64 parishes, with land areas that vary from roughly 180 square miles (466 square km) in Orleans parish near the city of New Orleans to more than 1,300 square…

  • church portrait (painting)

    Pieter Saenredam: …draftsman, pioneer of the “church portrait,” and the first Dutch artist to abandon the tradition of fanciful architectural painting in favour of a new realism in the rendering of specific buildings. His paintings of churches show a scrupulous neatness and precision, combined with subtle atmospheric light and tonal unity…

  • church school

    Sunday school, school for religious education, usually for children and young people and usually a part of a church or parish. The movement has been important primarily in Protestantism. It has been the foremost vehicle for teaching the principles of the Christian religion and the Bible. Although

  • Church Slavonic language

    Old Church Slavonic language, Slavic language based primarily on the Macedonian (South Slavic) dialects around Thessalonica (Thessaloníki). It was used in the 9th century by the missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius, who were natives of Thessalonica, for preaching to the Moravian Slavs and for

  • church sonata (musical form)

    Sonata da chiesa, (Italian: “church sonata”) a type of sonata, most commonly a Baroque instrumental work with several (often four) movements, originally thought appropriate for church. The designation was not universal; such works were often labeled simply sonata. Compare sonata da

  • Church States (historical region, Italy)

    Papal States, territories of central Italy over which the pope had sovereignty from 756 to 1870. Included were the modern Italian regions of Lazio (Latium), Umbria, and Marche and part of Emilia-Romagna, though the extent of the territory, along with the degree of papal control, varied over the

  • church steeples (plant)

    agrimony: Common species: Common agrimony, also known as church steeples (Agrimonia eupatoria), is a herbaceous hardy perennial that is native to Europe and North Africa but is widespread in other northern temperate regions. Inhabiting hedge banks and the borders of fields, the plant grows to about 120 cm…

  • Church Universal and Triumphant (religion)

    Church Universal and Triumphant, the largest of several groups that emerged from I AM religious activity, a movement centred upon avowed contact with the Ascended Masters of the Great White Brotherhood, the order of spiritual beings, “the saints robed in white” that adherents believe guide the

  • Church World Service

    Church World Service, worldwide relief and rehabilitation agency, from 1951 to 1963 a department of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., and from 1964 incorporated in the Division of Overseas Ministries of the council. Organized in 1946 as an independent agency, it took

  • church year (Christianity)

    Church year, annual cycle of seasons and days observed in the Christian churches in commemoration of the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ and of his virtues as exhibited in the lives of the saints. The church year has deep roots in the primitive human impulse to mark certain times with

  • Church’s theorem (mathematics)

    Church’s thesis, a principle formulated by the 20th-century American logician Alonzo Church, stating that the recursive functions are the only functions that can be mechanically calculated. The theorem implies that the procedures of arithmetic cannot be used to decide the consistency of s

  • Church’s thesis (mathematics)

    Church’s thesis, a principle formulated by the 20th-century American logician Alonzo Church, stating that the recursive functions are the only functions that can be mechanically calculated. The theorem implies that the procedures of arithmetic cannot be used to decide the consistency of s

  • Church, Alonzo (American mathematician)

    Alonzo Church, U.S. mathematician. He earned a Ph.D. from Princeton University. His contributions to number theory and the theories of algorithms and computability laid the foundations of computer science. The rule known as Church’s theorem or Church’s thesis (proposed independently by Alan M.

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