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  • Chloé (fashion design label)

    Stella McCartney: …revitalize its 45-year-old design label, Chloé.

  • Chloe (film by Egoyan [2009])

    Atom Egoyan: His next film, Chloe (2009), examined sexual longing. The drama focused on a married woman who tests her husband’s faithfulness by hiring a prostitute to tempt him. Subsequent movies included the crime drama Devil’s Knot (2013), about the West Memphis Three, and Remember (2015), in which an Auschwitz…

  • Chloebia gouldiae (bird)

    grass finch: …the most colourful is the Gouldian finch (Chloebia, formerly Poephila, gouldiae) whose plumage is purple, gold, green, blue, and black; its face may be red, orange, or black. The star finch (Neochmia ruficauda) is greenish brown above and yellow below, with white-dotted red head, greenish gray breast, and white-barred red…

  • Chloëphaga hybrida (bird)

    sheldgoose: …South American species of Chloëphaga—the kelp goose (C. hybrida), the Magellan goose (C. picta), and the Andean goose (C. melanoptera)—and the Orinoco goose (Neochen jubatus). African sheldgeese include the spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis) and the Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus

  • Chloëphaga melanoptera (bird)

    sheldgoose: picta), and the Andean goose (C. melanoptera)—and the Orinoco goose (Neochen jubatus). African sheldgeese include the spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis) and the Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus).

  • Chloëphaga picta (bird)

    sheldgoose: hybrida), the Magellan goose (C. picta), and the Andean goose (C. melanoptera)—and the Orinoco goose (Neochen jubatus). African sheldgeese include the spur-winged goose (Plectropterus gambensis) and the Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus).

  • Chlogio (king of Franks)

    Chlodio, king of a tribe of Salian Franks, considered the founder of the Merovingian dynasty. Chlodio’s tribe renounced the suzerainty of Rome and spread southward into Gaul until they reached Cambrai. Their defeat (c. 431) by the Roman general Aetius at Helena in the area of Arras prevented

  • Chloia (Greek festival)

    Demeter: (2) Chloia, the festival of the grain beginning to sprout, held at Eleusis in the early spring (Anthesterion) in honour of Demeter Chloë (“the Green”), the goddess of growing vegetation. This festival is to be distinguished from the later sacrifice of a ram to the same…

  • Chłopi (work by Reymont)

    Władysław Stanisław Reymont: (1904–09; The Peasants; filmed 1973), is a chronicle of peasant life during the four seasons of a year. Written almost entirely in peasant dialect, it has been translated into many languages and won for Reymont the Nobel Prize.

  • Chłopicki, Józef (Polish general)

    Józef Chłopicki, general who served with distinction with the armies of Napoleon and was briefly the dictator of Poland after the November Insurrection of 1830. Chłopicki enlisted in the Polish army in 1785 and fought in the campaigns of 1792–94 before and after the Second Partition of Poland. He

  • Chlopsidae (eel)

    eel: Annotated classification: Family Chlopsidae (Xenocongridae) (false morays) Burrowing. 8 genera with 18 species. Pantropical. Family Muraenidae (morays) No pectorals, large mouth, often brightly coloured, voracious, sedentary. About 15 genera and approximately 190 species. Pantropical to subtropical. Family

  • chlor-alkali process

    chemical industry: Commercial preparation: The chlor-alkali industry—in which chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) are produced simultaneously by electrolytic decomposition of salt (sodium chloride)—has become the principal source of chlorine during the 20th century. As noted earlier, in the two important versions of the electrolytic process, brine is the electrolyte…

  • chloracne (pathology)

    poison: Herbicides: …is in the production of chloracne, a condition characterized by acne that appears between the eyes and the ears. In more severe form, acne may be found on the face, trunk, and buttocks. (Significant adverse health effects in the soldiers exposed to low amounts of TCDD in Vietnam have not…

  • chloral (drug)

    Chloral hydrate, the first synthetically produced sedative-hypnotic drug, commonly used in the late 19th century to treat insomnia and still occasionally used to reduce anxiety or produce sleep before surgery. Chloral hydrate acts as a depressant on the central nervous system, with sedative effects

  • chloral hydrate (drug)

    Chloral hydrate, the first synthetically produced sedative-hypnotic drug, commonly used in the late 19th century to treat insomnia and still occasionally used to reduce anxiety or produce sleep before surgery. Chloral hydrate acts as a depressant on the central nervous system, with sedative effects

  • chloramine (chemical compound)

    ammonia: Hydrazine: …hypochlorite ion, OCl−, to produce chloramine, NH2Cl, which reacts further with more ammonia and base to produce hydrazine. NH3 + OCl− → NH2Cl + OH− NH2Cl + NH3 + NaOH → N2H4 + NaCl + H2O In this process there is a detrimental reaction that occurs between hydrazine and chloramine…

  • chloramphenicol (drug)

    Chloramphenicol, antibiotic drug once commonly used in the treatment of infections caused by various bacteria, including those in the genera Rickettsia and Mycoplasma. Chloramphenicol was originally found as a product of the metabolism of the soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae (order

  • Chloranthaceae (plant family)

    Chloranthales: … tree, consisting of 1 family, Chloranthaceae, with 4 genera (Ascarina, Chloranthus, Hedyosmum, and Sarcandra) and about 75 species. Chloranthaceae appears very early in the flowering plant fossil record, but its relationships to other basal flowering plant groups remain somewhat unclear.

  • Chloranthales (plant order)

    Chloranthales, order of flowering plants, a basal branch of the angiosperm tree, consisting of 1 family, Chloranthaceae, with 4 genera (Ascarina, Chloranthus, Hedyosmum, and Sarcandra) and about 75 species. Chloranthaceae appears very early in the flowering plant fossil record, but its

  • chlorapatite (mineral)

    apatite: … (the most important mineral commercially), chlorapatite, hydroxylapatite, and carbonate-apatite. These minerals are all calcium phosphates, differing from one another chemically only in that fluorapatite contains fluorine; chlorapatite, chlorine; hydroxylapatite, a hydroxyl (OH) group; and carbonate-apatite, a carbonate (CO3) group. The fluorine, chlorine, hydroxyl, and carbonate substitute for one another, so…

  • chlorate (chemical compound)

    explosive: Chlorates and perchlorates: Interest in the chlorates and perchlorates (salts of chloric or perchloric acid) as a base for explosives dates back to 1788. They were mixed with various solid and liquid fuels. Many plants were built in Europe and the United States for the…

  • chlordan (chemical compound)

    Chlordane, a chlorinated cyclodiene that is the principal isomer formed in the preparation of a contact insecticide of the same name. Chlordane is a thick, odourless, amber liquid with a molecular formula of C10H6Cl8. The compound’s accepted name is octachlorohexahydromethanoindene. The

  • chlordane (chemical compound)

    Chlordane, a chlorinated cyclodiene that is the principal isomer formed in the preparation of a contact insecticide of the same name. Chlordane is a thick, odourless, amber liquid with a molecular formula of C10H6Cl8. The compound’s accepted name is octachlorohexahydromethanoindene. The

  • chlordiazepoxide (drug)

    Chlordiazepoxide, tranquilizing drug used in the treatment of anxiety. The drug was introduced in the 1960s under several trade names, including Libritabs (the original base) and Librium (the hydrochloride salt). Chlordiazepoxide belongs to a group of chemically related compounds called

  • Chlorella (genus of green algae)

    Chlorella, genus of green algae (family Chlorellaceae) found either singly or clustered in fresh or salt water and in soil. Chlorella has been extensively used in photosynthetic studies, in mass cultivation experiments, and for purifying sewage effluents. Because the algae multiply rapidly and are

  • chloride (chemical compound)

    halogen: Oxidation: known as halides—namely, fluorides, chlorides, bromides, iodides, and astatides. Many of the halides may be considered to be salts of the respective hydrogen halides, which are colourless gases at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and (except for hydrogen fluoride) form strong acids in aqueous solution. Indeed, the

  • chloride channel 1 (gene)

    myotonia: …in a gene known as CLCN1 (chloride channel 1, skeletal muscle). That gene normally produces a protein that controls chloride channels in skeletal muscle fibre cells. However, defects in CLCN1 disrupt ion flow, causing muscles to contract for prolonged periods of time. Mutation of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel…

  • chloride shift (biochemistry)

    human respiratory system: Transport of carbon dioxide: …two ions, known as the chloride shift, permits the plasma to be used as a storage site for bicarbonate without changing the electrical charge of either the plasma or the red blood cell. Only 26 percent of the total carbon dioxide content of blood exists as bicarbonate inside the red…

  • Chloridoideae (plant subfamily)

    Poaceae: Distribution and abundance: …members of the two subfamilies Chloridoideae and Panicoideae tolerate relatively warm and dry habitats through special adaptations for photosynthesis. Both subfamilies are concentrated in the tropics, and those that do extend into higher latitudes flower and grow mostly during the warmest part of the growing season. The 1,300 species of…

  • chlorinated hydrocarbon (chemical compound)

    insecticide: Chlorinated hydrocarbons: The chlorinated hydrocarbons were developed beginning in the 1940s after the discovery (1939) of the insecticidal properties of DDT. Other examples of this series are BHC, lindane, Chlorobenzilate, methoxychlor, and the cyclodienes (which include aldrin, dieldrin, chlordane, heptachlor, and endrin). Some of these…

  • chlorinated polyethylene (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Polyethylene (PE): Such modifications result in chlorinated polyethylene (CM) or chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSM), a virtually noncrystalline and elastic material. In a process similar to vulcanization, cross-linking of the molecules can be effected through the chlorine or chlorosulfonyl groups, making the material into a rubbery solid. Because their main polymer chains are…

  • chlorination (chemical reaction)

    dichlorobenzene: …dichlorobenzenes is produced by the chlorination of chlorobenzene or by the dichlorination of benzene in the presence of iron(III) chloride. The 1,4- isomer is the most easily isolated of the dichlorobenzenes and was first described in 1864; the 1,2- and 1,3- isomers were not recognized until 1875.

  • chlorination (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Roasters: Chlorinators are used for roasting oxides to chlorides. They are tall, circular steel shells lined with refractory brick to prevent chlorine attack on the steel. The top of each chlorinator has a sealed hopper for periodic feed charging, and gaseous or liquid chlorine is added…

  • chlorination (water)

    aquarium: Maintenance problems: …thus, chemical treatments, such as chlorination, which would kill fishes, can be used to control bacteria and to improve water clarity. Seawater formulas are simpler; for example, a 2 percent sodium chloride solution will satisfactorily maintain whales and dolphins. Seals and sea lions have been kept in fresh water, but…

  • chlorine (chemical element)

    Chlorine (Cl), chemical element, the second lightest member of the halogen elements, or Group 17 (Group VIIa) of the periodic table. Chlorine is a toxic, corrosive, greenish yellow gas that is irritating to the eyes and to the respiratory system. atomic number 17 atomic weight 35.453 melting point

  • chlorine deficiency

    Chlorine deficiency, condition in which chlorine is insufficient or is not utilized properly. Chlorine is a component of all body secretions and excretions resulting from processes of building (anabolism) and breaking down (catabolism) body tissues. Levels of chlorine closely parallel levels of

  • chlorine dioxide (chemical compound)

    papermaking: Bleaching and washing: In recent years the compound chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has become available for on-site preparation; it is too unstable to be shipped for wood pulp bleaching. By the use of small amounts of ClO2 in later bleaching stages, it is possible to achieve high degrees of purification and brightness without the…

  • chlorine trifluoride (chemical compound)

    chemical industry: Isotope separation: …reactive interhalogen compounds such as chlorine trifluoride (ClF3), used for cutting steel, and for the preparation of sulfur hexafluoride, an extremely stable gas that has been employed as an insulator in electrical applications.

  • chlorine-36 (isotope)

    mass spectrometry: Applications: …source of beryllium-10, carbon-14, and chlorine-36, which are deposited in rain and snow, whence their migration may be followed. A question concerning the origin of the lavas of island-arc volcanoes, which had been disputed since the general acceptance of the plate tectonic theory of the Earth’s structure, was settled from…

  • chlorine-alkali-electrolysis

    chemical industry: Commercial preparation: The chlor-alkali industry—in which chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) are produced simultaneously by electrolytic decomposition of salt (sodium chloride)—has become the principal source of chlorine during the 20th century. As noted earlier, in the two important versions of the electrolytic process, brine is the electrolyte…

  • Chloriridovirus (virus genus)

    iridovirus: …in this family are Iridovirus, Chloriridovirus, Lymphocystivirus, Ranavirus, and Megalocytivirus. Type species of the family include invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (Iridovirus), which infects insects; lymphocystis disease virus 1 (Lymphocystivirus), which infects fish; and

  • Chloris (plant)

    Windmill grass, (genus Chloris), genus of about 55 species of annual and perennial grasses of the family Poaceae, distributed throughout warm regions of the world. Several are used as forage and hay grasses, and a number are considered weeds or invasive species in areas outside their native range.

  • Chloris gayana (plant)

    windmill grass: Rhodes grass (C. gayana), a tufted perennial native to South Africa, has been introduced into other areas of the world for forage.

  • Chloris verticillata (plant)

    windmill grass: truncata) and the North American tumble windmill grass (C. verticillata) are perennial species of waste areas. Rhodes grass (C. gayana), a tufted perennial native to South Africa, has been introduced into other areas of the world for forage.

  • Chloris virgata (plant)

    windmill grass: Feathered finger grass (Chloris virgata) is a weedy North American annual with feathery flower spikelets. Australian finger grass (C. truncata) and the North American tumble windmill grass (C. verticillata) are perennial species of waste areas. Rhodes grass (C. gayana), a tufted perennial native to South…

  • chlorite (mineral)

    Chlorite, widespread group of layer silicate minerals occurring in both macroscopic and clay-grade sizes; they are hydrous aluminum silicates, usually of magnesium and iron. The name, from the Greek for “green,” refers to chlorite’s typical colour. Chlorites have a silicate layer structure similar

  • chloritoid (mineral)

    Chloritoid, common silicate mineral, a basic aluminosilicate of manganese, magnesium, and iron. Once thought to be a member of the brittle mica group, chloritoid has been demonstrated to be structurally different; it is further distinguished by its high iron content, its lack of calcium, its

  • chlormadinone acetate (chemistry)

    steroid: Antiandrogens and antiestrogens: …such as medroxyprogesterone acetate and chlormadinone acetate (26), have antiandrogenic properties that are the basis for their use against benign or malignant hyperplasia of androgen-dependent tissues such as the prostate. Other antiandrogens are cyproterone (27) and A-nortestosterone and A-norprogesterone and their derivatives.

  • chloroacetic acid (chemical compound)

    carboxylic acid: Acidity: Similarly, chloroacetic acid, ClCH2 COOH, in which the strongly electron-withdrawing chlorine replaces a hydrogen atom, is about 100 times stronger as an acid than acetic acid, and nitroacetic acid, NO2CH2 COOH, is even stronger. (The NO2 group is a very strong electron-withdrawing group.) An even greater…

  • ω-chloroacetophenone (tear gas)

    tear gas: …tear gases are ω-chloroacetophenone, or CN, and o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, or CS. CN is the principal component of the aerosol agent Mace and is widely used in riot control. It affects chiefly the eyes. CS is a stronger irritant that causes burning sensations in the respiratory tract and involuntary closing of the…

  • chlorobenzene (chemical compound)

    Chlorobenzene, a colourless, mobile liquid with a penetrating almondlike odour; it belongs to the family of organic halogen compounds and is used as a solvent and starting material for the manufacture of other organic compounds. Chlorobenzene was first prepared in 1851 by the reaction of phenol

  • Chlorobiaceae (bacteria family)

    bacteria: Phototrophic metabolism: The green bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) and purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) use elemental sulfur, sulfide, thiosulfate, or hydrogen gas as electron donor, whereas the purple nonsulfur bacteria use electrons from hydrogen or organic substrates. These bacteria require anaerobic conditions for photosynthetic activity. The photosystem in green bacteria is related to…

  • chlorobiont (protist)
  • Chlorocardium rodiei (tree, Chlorocardium rodiei)

    Greenheart, (Chlorocardium rodiei), valuable South American timber tree of the laurel family (Lauraceae). A large tree, it grows to a height of 40 metres (130 feet) and is native to the Guianas. The bark and fruits contain bebeerine, an alkaloid formerly used to reduce fever. Greenheart wood, which

  • Chlorocebus (primate)

    Vervet, (genus Chlorocebus), any of six known species of widely distributed semiarboreal African monkeys. Vervet monkeys are quadrupedal and occur throughout sub-Saharan Africa in savannas and dry deciduous forests. They may be found as far north as Egypt or as far south as South Africa. The six

  • Chlorocebus aethiops (monkey)

    Grivet, (Chlorocebus aethiops), African savanna monkey, a species of

  • Chlorocebus cynosuros (primate)

    vervet: …Ethiopia and northeastern Africa, the Malbrouck monkey (C. cynosuros) of Angola and the southern Congo, the bale monkey (C. djamdjamensis) of the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, the vervet (C. pygerythrus) of eastern and southern Africa, the green monkey (C. sabaeus) of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C.

  • Chlorocebus djamdjamensis (primate)

    vervet: … and the southern Congo, the bale monkey (C. djamdjamensis) of the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, the vervet (C. pygerythrus) of eastern and southern Africa, the green monkey (C. sabaeus) of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C. tantalus) of central Africa. Vervet monkeys are closely related to guenons and were…

  • Chlorocebus pygerythrus (monkey)

    vervet: …of Ethiopia, the vervet (C. pygerythrus) of eastern and southern Africa, the green monkey (C. sabaeus) of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C. tantalus) of central Africa. Vervet monkeys are closely related to guenons and were formerly classified with them in genus Cercopithecus. The green monkey has been…

  • Chlorocebus sabaeus (primate)

    vervet: …eastern and southern Africa, the green monkey (C. sabaeus) of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C. tantalus) of central Africa. Vervet monkeys are closely related to guenons and were formerly classified with them in genus Cercopithecus. The green monkey has been established on several islands in the Caribbean Sea,…

  • Chlorocebus tantalus (primate)

    vervet: …of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C. tantalus) of central Africa. Vervet monkeys are closely related to guenons and were formerly classified with them in genus Cercopithecus. The green monkey has been established on several islands in the Caribbean Sea, having been introduced there in the late 17th century.…

  • chlorocruorin (biochemistry)

    annelid: Respiratory system: …respiratory pigment, either hemoglobin or chlorocruorin. Hemoglobin, the most common pigment, is present in most free-moving and some sedentary polychaetes and in most oligochaetes and leeches. Chlorocruorin is found in several polychaete groups (Flabelligerida, Terebellomorpha, and Serpulimorpha). A few free-moving polychaetes, some oligochaetes, and rhynchobdellid leeches have colourless blood. The…

  • chlorodifluoromethane (chemical compound)

    chloroform: …is in the preparation of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22). HCFC-22 contributes to depletion of the ozone layer, and its production is scheduled to halt by 2020 in the United States. As HCFC-22 production is phased out, chloroform production is expected to decrease significantly.

  • chloroethane (chemical compound)

    Ethyl chloride (C2H5Cl), colourless, flammable gas belonging to the family of organohalogen compounds. At one time, ethyl chloride was a high-volume industrial chemical used in the preparation of the gasoline additive tetraethyl lead. Beginning with restrictions on leaded gasoline in the 1970s and

  • chloroethylene (chemical compound)

    Vinyl chloride, a colourless, flammable, toxic gas belonging to the family of organohalogen compounds and used principally in making polyvinyl chloride, or PVC, a widely used plastic with numerous applications. The major industrial preparation of vinyl chloride begins with ethylene and has two

  • chlorofluorocarbon (chemical compound)

    Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), any of several organic compounds composed of carbon, fluorine, and chlorine. When CFCs also contain hydrogen in place of one or more chlorines, they are called hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs. CFCs are also called Freons, a trademark of the E.I. du Pont de Nemours &

  • chloroform (chemical compound)

    Chloroform (CHCl3), nonflammable, clear, colourless liquid that is denser than water and has a pleasant etherlike odour. It was first prepared in 1831. The Scottish physician Sir James Simpson of the University of Edinburgh was the first to use it as an anesthetic in 1847. It later captured public

  • Chlorohydra viridissima (cnidarian)

    zoochlorella: , green hydra and green Paramecium bursaria). As symbionts, zoochlorellae use carbon dioxide and nitrogenous and phosphorous wastes and, in illuminated conditions, provide oxygen and useful nutrients to their hosts. Sometimes zoochlorellae are digested by the host. They may be passed from one generation to another…

  • chloromelanite (mineral)

    jadeite: …greenish black varieties are called chloromelanite and are coloured by iron.

  • chloromethane (chemical compound)

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), a colourless, flammable, toxic gas. Methyl chloride is primarily prepared by reaction of methanol with hydrogen chloride, although it also can be prepared by chlorination of methane. Annual production in the United States alone is in the hundreds of millions of kg, half of

  • chloromonad (algae)

    Chloromonad, any protozoan of the phytoflagellate order Chloromonadida, sometimes considered a member of the algal class Chloromonadophyceae because it has many disk-shaped, chlorophyll-containing chloroplasts. Chloromonads are characterized by two flagella, one projecting forward and one

  • Chloromonadida (algae)

    Chloromonad, any protozoan of the phytoflagellate order Chloromonadida, sometimes considered a member of the algal class Chloromonadophyceae because it has many disk-shaped, chlorophyll-containing chloroplasts. Chloromonads are characterized by two flagella, one projecting forward and one

  • Chloromonadophyceae (algae class)

    algae: Annotated classification: Class Raphidophyceae (Chloromonadophyceae) Flagellates with mucocysts (mucilage-releasing bodies) occasionally found in freshwater or marine environments; fewer than 50 species; includes Chattonella, Gonyostomum, Heterosigma, Psammamonas, and Vacuolaria. Class Synurophyceae

  • chloromycetin (drug)

    Chloramphenicol, antibiotic drug once commonly used in the treatment of infections caused by various bacteria, including those in the genera Rickettsia and Mycoplasma. Chloramphenicol was originally found as a product of the metabolism of the soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae (order

  • Chloronia (insect genus)

    dobsonfly: Dobsonflies of the genus Chloronia, also in the Corydalus lineage, are distinguished from other corydalids by the bright yellow colour of adults.

  • Chlorophanes spiza (bird)

    honeycreeper: The male of the green honeycreeper (Chlorophanes spiza) of Central America and northern South America sports glossy blue-green plumage and a black face mask. Both sexes have a yellow bill and red eyes. The male of the red-legged, or blue, honeycreeper (Cyanerpes cyaneus), which ranges from Cuba and Mexico…

  • chlorophenol (chemical compound)

    Chlorophenol, any of a group of toxic, colourless, weakly acidic organic compounds in which one or more of the hydrogen atoms attached to the benzene ring of phenol have been replaced by chlorine atoms; 2-chlorophenol is a liquid at room temperature, but all the other chlorophenols are solids. Most

  • Chlorophis (reptile)

    green snake: The African green snakes (Chlorophis) have keeled ventral plates and are arboreal. Others of this genus are found in eastern and southern Asia.

  • Chlorophoneus multicolor (bird)

    shrike: The many-coloured bush-shrike (Chlorophoneus multicolor) is noted for polymorphic variation in the colour of its underparts—a shade of red or yellow but sometimes black or white. The gorgeous, or four-coloured, bush-shrike (Telophorus quadricolor) is green above and golden below, with black-bordered red throat. Some authors equate…

  • Chlorophora excelsa (tree)

    iroko wood: iroko tree (Chlorophora excelsa), native to the west coast of Africa. It is sometimes called African, or Nigerian, teak, but the iroko is unrelated to the teak family. The wood is tough, dense, and very durable. It is often used in cabinetmaking and paneling as…

  • Chlorophyceae (class of green algae)

    algae: Annotated classification: Class Chlorophyceae Primarily freshwater; includes Chlamydomonas, Chlorella, Dunaliella, Oedogonium, and Volvox.

  • chlorophyll (biology)

    Chlorophyll, any member of the most important class of pigments involved in photosynthesis, the process by which light energy is converted to chemical energy through the synthesis of organic compounds. Chlorophyll is found in virtually all photosynthetic organisms, including green plants,

  • chlorophyll a (biology)

    blue-green algae: …contain only one form of chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, a green pigment. In addition, they contain various yellowish carotenoids, the blue pigment phycobilin, and, in some species, the red pigment phycoerythrin. The combination of phycobilin and chlorophyll produces the characteristic blue-green colour from which these organisms derive their popular name. Because…

  • chlorophyll b (biology)

    chloroplast: Characteristics of chloroplasts: chlorophyll b. A function of those pigments is to absorb light energy. In plants, chloroplasts occur in all green tissues, though they are concentrated particularly in the parenchyma cells of the leaf mesophyll.

  • chlorophyllide (biology)

    algae: Photosynthesis and light-absorbing pigments: …various combinations of other chlorophylls, chlorophyllides, carotenoids, and phycobiliproteins to collect additional light from wavelengths of the spectrum not absorbed by chlorophyll a or b. The chromophyte algae, dinoflagellates, cryptomonads (class Cryptophyceae), and the class Micromonadophyceae, for example, also use chlorophyllides. (Chlorophyllides, often incorrectly called chlorophylls, differ from true chlorophylls…

  • Chlorophyta (protist)

    Green algae, members of the division Chlorophyta, comprising between 9,000 and 12,000 species. The photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotene, and xanthophyll) are in the same proportions as those in higher plants. The typical green algal cell, which can be motile or nonmotile, has a

  • Chlorophytum (plant genus)

    Chlorophytum, genus of about 150 species of flowering plants in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae). The plants are native to tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia, and Australia, and some are grown as ornamentals. The popular spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is a common houseplant

  • Chlorophytum comosum (plant)

    Spider plant, (Chlorophytum comosum), African plant of the asparagus family (Asparagaceae) commonly grown as an ornamental houseplant. The most popular varieties feature long grassy green-and-white-striped leaves. Periodically a flower stem emerges, and tiny white flowers—not always produced—are

  • chloropicrin (chemical compound)

    Chloropicrin (Cl3CNO2), toxic organic compound used alone or in combination with methyl bromide as a soil fumigant and fungicide. Chloropicrin has a boiling point of 112 °C (234 °F). Its vapours are irritating to the skin, eyes, and upper respiratory tract, and it has been used in chemical warfare

  • chloropid fly (insect)

    Frit fly, any small fly of the family Chloropidae (order Diptera), destructive to oats, rye, barley, wheat, and other cereal grains. Frit flies, often bright yellow and black, are usually found in grassy areas. The larvae live in developing grain heads and within stems, causing the central leaf to

  • Chloropidae (insect)

    Frit fly, any small fly of the family Chloropidae (order Diptera), destructive to oats, rye, barley, wheat, and other cereal grains. Frit flies, often bright yellow and black, are usually found in grassy areas. The larvae live in developing grain heads and within stems, causing the central leaf to

  • chloroplast (biology)

    Chloroplast, structure within the cells of plants and green algae that is the site of photosynthesis, the process by which light energy is converted to chemical energy, resulting in the production of oxygen and energy-rich organic compounds. Photosynthetic cyanobacteria are free-living close

  • chloroplast DNA (genetics)

    heredity: Extranuclear DNA: Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) contains genes that are involved with aspects of photosynthesis and with components of the special protein-synthesizing apparatus that is active within the organelle. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains some of the genes that participate in the conversion of the energy of chemical bonds into the…

  • chloroplastin (plant anatomy)

    coloration: Chlorophylls: …of chlorophyll with protein in chloroplastin is of special significance, because only as a result of the combination is chlorophyll able to remain resistant to light.

  • chloroplatinic acid (chemical compound)

    Hexachloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6∙6H2O), complex compound formed by dissolving platinum metal in aqua regia (a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids) or in hydrochloric acid that contains chlorine. It is crystallized from the solution in the form of reddish brown deliquescent (moisture-absorbing)

  • chloroprene (chemical compound)

    chemistry of industrial polymers: Polymerization of dienes: isoprene (CH2=C[CH3]―CH=CH2), and chloroprene (CH2=C[Cl]―CH=CH2). When diene monomers such as these undergo polymerization, a number of different repeating units may be formed. Isoprene, for example, forms four, having the following designations:

  • chloroprene rubber (chemical compound)

    Neoprene (CR), synthetic rubber produced by the polymerization (or linking together of single molecules into giant, multiple-unit molecules) of chloroprene. A good general-purpose rubber, neoprene is valued for its high tensile strength, resilience, oil and flame resistance, and resistance to

  • Chloropseidae (bird family)

    Irenidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of the leafbirds, ioras, and fairy bluebirds, about 14 species of small brightly coloured birds of the forests and farms of southeastern Asia. Members range in size from 13 to 25 cm (5 to 10 inches) long. They appear to be closely related

  • Chloropsis (bird)

    Leafbird, (genus Chloropsis), any of about 10 species of short-legged, grass-green birds (family Irenidae, order Passeriformes) from Southeast Asia and the Philippines. Some authorities place the leafbird in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). Leafbirds are about 17 to 20 cm (6.5 to 8 inches) long.

  • Chloropsis aurifrons (bird)

    leafbird: The golden-fronted leafbird (C. aurifrons) is a popular cage bird.

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