• 0-9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • Amabutho (album by Ladysmith Black Mambazo)

    Ladysmith Black Mambazo: …1973 Ladysmith Black Mambazo released Amabutho, the first African album to reach gold record status (25,000 sold). The group gained worldwide recognition from its 1986 collaboration with American singer-songwriter Paul Simon on his Grammy Award-winning Graceland, one of the best-selling albums of the 1980s, and in 1987 Ladysmith Black Mambazo…

  • amabutho (Zulu regiment)

    South Africa: Emergence of the eastern states: Zulu amabutho (age sets or regiments) defended against raiders, provided protection for refugees, and, apparently, began to trade in ivory and slaves themselves.

  • Amacher, Maryanne (American composer)

    Maryanne Amacher, American composer (born Feb. 25, 1938, Kane, Pa.—died Oct. 22, 2009, Rhinebeck, N.Y.), produced experimental electronic musical works that incorporated multiple aspects of acoustics and hearing on a large scale. Amacher studied composition privately with Karlheinz Stockhausen and

  • amacrine cell (physiology)

    photoreception: Neural transmission: …(the inner plexiform layer) containing amacrine cells of many different kinds. A great deal of complex processing occurs within the two plexiform layers. The main function of the horizontal cells is to vary the extent of coupling between photoreceptors and between photoreceptors and bipolar cells. This provides a control system…

  • Amadeo (king of Spain)

    Amadeus, king of Spain from Nov. 16, 1870, until his abdication on Feb. 11, 1873, after which the first Spanish republic was proclaimed. The second son of the future King Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia-Piedmont (later, of Italy), he was originally called Amadeus I, duke of Aosta. His candidacy for

  • Amadeus (king of Spain)

    Amadeus, king of Spain from Nov. 16, 1870, until his abdication on Feb. 11, 1873, after which the first Spanish republic was proclaimed. The second son of the future King Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia-Piedmont (later, of Italy), he was originally called Amadeus I, duke of Aosta. His candidacy for

  • Amadeus (play by Shaffer)

    Sir Peter Shaffer: …stableboy’s obsession with horses, and Amadeus (1979; film 1984), about the rivalry between Mozart and his fellow composer Antonio Salieri. The film version of the latter play won eight Academy Awards, including best adapted screenplay for Shaffer. His later plays include the biblical epic Yonadab (1985), Lettice and Lovage (1987),…

  • Amadeus (film by Forman [1984])

    Amadeus, American dramatic film, released in 1984, that was a largely fictionalized account of the relationship between Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his less talented but popular contemporary Antonio Salieri. The lushly detailed movie won eight Academy Awards, among them that for best picture, and

  • Amadeus Basin (geological formation, Australia)

    Australia: Principal regimes: …Australia shed gravels into the Amadeus Basin. By the mid-Carboniferous Period (320 million years ago), central Australia was deformed by folding and thrusting along east-west axes, and eastern Australia was deformed by folding along north-south axes and a subsequent granitoid intrusion that consolidated the Lachlan and Thomson fold belts in…

  • Amadeus Quartet (English string quartet)

    Amadeus Quartet, English string quartet (1948–87), one of the most durable and highly regarded quartets of Europe. The quartet was formed in 1947, the result of an internment-camp meeting during World War II between three young Austrian Jewish refugees—Peter Schidlof, the group’s violist; Norbert

  • Amadeus the Green Count (count of Savoy)

    Amadeus VI, count of Savoy (1343–83) who significantly extended Savoy’s territory and power. Son of Aimone the Peaceful, count of Savoy, Amadeus ascended the throne at the age of nine. He crossed the Alps in 1348 to put down a revolt of Piedmontese cities and won a victory over rebellious

  • Amadeus the Peaceful (antipope and duke of Savoy)

    Amadeus VIII, count (1391–1416) and duke (1416–40) of Savoy, first member of the house of Savoy to assume the title of duke. His 42-year reign saw the extension of his authority from Lake Neuchâtel on the north to the Ligurian coast, and under the title of Felix V he was an antipope for 10 years

  • Amadeus the Red Count (count of Savoy)

    Amadeus VII, count of Savoy (1383–91), during whose short rule the county of Savoy acquired Nice and other Provençal towns. Son of Amadeus VI and Bonne of Bourbon, Amadeus married (1377) the daughter of Jean, duc de Berry, brother of the king of France. His father, the “Green Count,” wore his c

  • Amadeus Transverse Zone (Australian geology)

    Australia: Chronological summary: …the fold belts of the Amadeus Transverse Zone in central Australia guided the overthrusting of blocks in the north over those in the south during the late Paleozoic.

  • Amadeus V the Great (count of Savoy)

    House of Savoy: Amadeus V (reigned 1285–1323) introduced the Salic Law of Succession and the law of primogeniture to avoid any future partition of the family’s dominions between various members. Amadeus VI (reigned 1343–83) enlarged and further consolidated their territory, and under Amadeus VII (reigned 1383–91) the port…

  • Amadeus VI (count of Savoy)

    Amadeus VI, count of Savoy (1343–83) who significantly extended Savoy’s territory and power. Son of Aimone the Peaceful, count of Savoy, Amadeus ascended the throne at the age of nine. He crossed the Alps in 1348 to put down a revolt of Piedmontese cities and won a victory over rebellious

  • Amadeus VII (count of Savoy)

    Amadeus VII, count of Savoy (1383–91), during whose short rule the county of Savoy acquired Nice and other Provençal towns. Son of Amadeus VI and Bonne of Bourbon, Amadeus married (1377) the daughter of Jean, duc de Berry, brother of the king of France. His father, the “Green Count,” wore his c

  • Amadeus VIII (antipope and duke of Savoy)

    Amadeus VIII, count (1391–1416) and duke (1416–40) of Savoy, first member of the house of Savoy to assume the title of duke. His 42-year reign saw the extension of his authority from Lake Neuchâtel on the north to the Ligurian coast, and under the title of Felix V he was an antipope for 10 years

  • Amadeus, Lake (lake, Northern Territory, Australia)

    Lake Amadeus, salty mud basin in southwestern Northern Territory, Australia. The lake occupies a shallow trough filled with sediments washed from the MacDonnell (north) and Musgrave (south) ranges. It intermittently contains a few inches of water and at such times may measure as much as 90 miles

  • Amadi, Elechi (Nigerian writer)

    Elechi Amadi, Nigerian novelist and playwright best known for works that explore traditional life and the role of the supernatural in rural Nigeria. Amadi, an Ikwere (Ikwerre, Ikwerri) who wrote in English, studied physics and mathematics at Government College, Umuahia, and the University of

  • Amadigi (work by Tasso)

    Bernardo Tasso: …was a 100-canto epic called Amadigi (published 1560), based on an earlier Spanish chivalric novel about that knight. One critic has termed Amadigi “vast, serious, and unreadable.” Some critics, however, find Bernardo’s amplification of an episode from Amadigi more interesting; left incomplete at his death, it was subsequently worked over…

  • amadinda (musical instrument)

    African music: Interlocking: …in the music of the amadinda and embaire xylophones of southern Uganda. A special type of notation is now used for these xylophones, consisting of numbers and periods. A number indicates that a player strikes a note; the number refers to the note in the scale, as 5, for example,…

  • Amadis de Gaula (prose romance)

    Amadís of Gaul, prose romance of chivalry, possibly Portuguese in origin. The first known version of this work, dating from 1508, was written in Spanish by Garci Ordóñez (or Rodríguez) de Montalvo, who claimed to have “corrected and emended” corrupt originals. Internal evidence suggests that the

  • Amadis of Gaul (prose romance)

    Amadís of Gaul, prose romance of chivalry, possibly Portuguese in origin. The first known version of this work, dating from 1508, was written in Spanish by Garci Ordóñez (or Rodríguez) de Montalvo, who claimed to have “corrected and emended” corrupt originals. Internal evidence suggests that the

  • Amado, Jorge (Brazilian author)

    Jorge Amado, novelist whose stories of life in the eastern Brazilian state of Bahia won international acclaim. Amado grew up on a cacao plantation, Auricídia, and was educated at the Jesuit college in Salvador and studied law at Federal University in Rio de Janeiro. He published his first novel at

  • Amadou and Mariam (Malian music group)

    Amadou and Mariam, Malian musical duo who achieved global success by combining West African influences with rhythm and blues. Amadou Bagayoko (b. October 24, 1954, Bamako, French West Africa [now Mali]) and Mariam Doumbia (b. April 15, 1958, Bamako) met at the Bamako Institute for the Young Blind.

  • Amadou Tal (Tukulor leader)

    Mali: The 19th century: His eldest son, Amadou Tal, who had been installed at Ségou, unsuccessfully attempted to exert control over the whole Tukulor empire in a series of civil wars. He became head of the Ségou Tukulor empire, whose predominantly Bambara inhabitants mounted constant revolts against his rule.

  • Amadou, Hama (prime minister of Niger)

    Mahamadou Issoufou: …nearest challenger, former prime minister Hama Amadou, who won about 17 percent, advanced to a runoff election scheduled to be held the next month. The opposition boycotted the March 20, 2016, election, however, which led to a landslide victory for Issoufou, who won about 92 percent of the vote.

  • Amafinius (Roman writer)

    Epicureanism: The Epicurean school: …Latin prose was a certain Amafinius. At the time of Cicero, Epicureanism was in fact the philosophy in vogue; and the number of Romans subscribing to it was, according to Cicero, very large. Among the greatest was Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 95–55 bce), who, in the poem De rerum natura…

  • Amagasaki (Japan)

    Amagasaki, city, southeastern Hyōgo ken (prefecture), west-central Honshu, Japan. It lies on Ōsaka Bay between Ōsaka (east) and Nishinomiya (west) and is a major industrial suburb of the Ōsaka-Kōbe (Hanshin) metropolitan area. In the feudal period it was a castle town. During the 20th century

  • Amahl and the Night Visitors (opera by Menotti)

    Gian Carlo Menotti: Amahl and the Night Visitors (1951), the first opera composed for television, is the story of a lame shepherd boy who gives his crutch to the Three Wise Men as a gift for the Christ child. With The Saint of Bleecker Street (1954) Menotti won…

  • amahraspand (Zoroastrianism)

    Amesha spenta, (Avestan: “beneficent immortal”) in Zoroastrianism, any of the six divine beings or archangels created by Ahura Mazdā, the Wise Lord, to help govern creation. Three are male, three female. Ministers of his power against the evil spirit, Ahriman, they are depicted clustered about

  • amakhanda (Zulu settlement)

    South Africa: Emergence of the eastern states: …state with fortified settlements called amakhanda. Zulu amabutho (age sets or regiments) defended against raiders, provided protection for refugees, and, apparently, began to trade in ivory and slaves themselves.

  • amakihi (bird)

    Amakihi, (Loxops virens), perhaps the most common native songbird in Hawaii, a member of the Hawaiian honeycreeper family, Drepanididae (order Passeriformes). It is 12 cm (5 inches) long, with yellow body, black eye-mark, and rather short, slightly curved bill. It feeds on insects and small fruits

  • Amakusa Islands (archipelago, Japan)

    Amakusa Islands, archipelago off western Kyushu, Japan, in the Amakusa Sea. Administered by Kumamoto ken (prefecture), it includes about 100 islands, the largest of which are Kami (“Upper”) Island and Shimo (“Lower”) Island. There is little farming because of the rough, mountainous terrain, and t

  • Amakusa Shiro (Japanese samurai)

    Japan: The enforcement of national seclusion: …and the prohibition of Christianity, Amakusa Shiro, a Christian masterless samurai (rōnin), led an uprising of peasants and Christians in the Shimabara Peninsula of Kyushu. For five months they put up a fierce fight before their defeat by the bakufu army. The bakufu having been hard-pressed to quell the rebellion,…

  • Amakusa-shotō (archipelago, Japan)

    Amakusa Islands, archipelago off western Kyushu, Japan, in the Amakusa Sea. Administered by Kumamoto ken (prefecture), it includes about 100 islands, the largest of which are Kami (“Upper”) Island and Shimo (“Lower”) Island. There is little farming because of the rough, mountainous terrain, and t

  • Amal (Lebanese organization)

    Hassan Nasrallah: Early life and career: …to Lebanon and fought with Amal, becoming the group’s Al-Biqāʿ valley commander. Following Israel’s invasion of Lebanon in 1982, Nasrallah left Amal to join the nascent Hezbollah movement, a more-radical force that was heavily influenced by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran.

  • Amalaric (king of the Visigoths)

    Amalaric, king of the Visigoths (526–531) and son of Alaric II and Theodegotha. Amalaric was a child when his father fell in battle against Clovis, king of the Franks (507). He was carried for safety into Spain, which country, with southern Languedoc and Provence, was thenceforth ruled by his

  • Amalasuintha (queen of the Ostrogoths)

    Amalasuntha, daughter of Theodoric the Great, Ostrogothic king of Italy, and regent (526) and queen (534) of the Ostrogoths (526–534). When her husband died, Amalasuntha was left with a son, Athalaric, and a daughter. At Theodoric’s death, in 526, Athalaric was 10 years old, and the highly educated

  • Amalasuntha (queen of the Ostrogoths)

    Amalasuntha, daughter of Theodoric the Great, Ostrogothic king of Italy, and regent (526) and queen (534) of the Ostrogoths (526–534). When her husband died, Amalasuntha was left with a son, Athalaric, and a daughter. At Theodoric’s death, in 526, Athalaric was 10 years old, and the highly educated

  • Amalekites (ancient tribe)

    Amalekite, member of an ancient nomadic tribe, or collection of tribes, described in the Old Testament as relentless enemies of Israel, even though they were closely related to Ephraim, one of the 12 tribes of Israel. The district over which they ranged was south of Judah and probably extended

  • Amalfi (Italy)

    Amalfi, town and archiepiscopal see, Campania regione, southern Italy. It lies in the ravine of the Mulini Valley, along the Gulf of Salerno, southeast of Naples. Although it was known in the 4th century, Amalfi was of little importance until the mid-6th century under the Byzantines. As one of the

  • Amalfi, Ottavio Piccolomini, duca d’ (Austrian general)

    Ottavio Piccolomini-Pieri, duca d’Amalfi, general and diplomat in the service of the house of Habsburg during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–48) and one of the imperial generalissimo Albrecht von Wallenstein’s most-trusted lieutenants. His skills both on the battlefield (Thionville, 1639) and at the

  • amalgam (alloy)

    Amalgam, alloy of mercury and one or more other metals. Amalgams are crystalline in structure, except for those with a high mercury content, which are liquid. Known since early times, they were mentioned by Pliny the Elder in the 1st century ad. In dentistry, an amalgam of silver and tin, with

  • Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers (American labour organization)

    United Steelworkers: …of Industrial Organizations) and the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers, an older union that had failed in earlier attempts to organize American steelworkers. Operating within the CIO, the newly formed union was called the Steel Workers Organizing Committee (SWOC).

  • Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (American union)

    Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU), former union of garment and apparel workers in the United States and Canada. It was formed in 1976 by the merger of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), a large union representing workers in the men’s clothing industry, with the

  • Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (American union)

    Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union: …by the merger of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), a large union representing workers in the men’s clothing industry, with the Textile Workers Union of America, a smaller union founded in 1939. The ACWA was originally formed when militant elements within the United Garment Workers, a relatively conservative…

  • Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union (British union)

    Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union (AEEU), the leading trade union in the manufacturing sector of the United Kingdom until 2001, when it combined with two other British unions. The Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union (AEEU) originated in 1992 through the merger of the Amalgamated

  • Amalgamated Engineering Union (British union)

    Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union: …through the merger of the Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU) with the Electrical, Electronic, Telecommunication and Plumbing Union (EETPU).

  • Amalgamated Flying Saucer Clubs of America (American organization)

    new religious movement: Scientific NRMs: UFO groups and Scientology: The Amalgamated Flying Saucer Clubs of America, led by Gabriel Green, and the Aetherius Society, organized by George King, maintained that space aliens held the key to the salvation both of the planet as a whole and of every individual on Earth.

  • Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (American union)

    Ralph Helstein: …the UPWA merged with the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America (AMCBWNA), and Helstein became a vice president as well as special counsel of the new organization. In 1968–69 he retired from his various union positions.

  • Amalgamated Press (British periodical industry)

    Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, Viscount Northcliffe: …the Amalgamated Press (from 1959 Fleetway Press), the largest periodical-publishing empire in the world.

  • Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners (British labour organization)

    organized labour: Craft unionism in the 19th century: …Society of Engineers and the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners, constituted in 1851 and 1860, respectively. In Australia the main impetus to the national organization of trades came later, with the federation of the separate colonies in 1901.

  • Amalgamated Society of Engineers (British labour organization)

    Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union: The AEU’s forerunner was the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, a powerful craft union formed in 1851 through a merger with nine other unions. The AEU began to organize on industrial lines in the 1920s as crafts gave way to mass production. Despite a 40 percent membership decline in the 1980s,…

  • amalgamation (metallurgy)

    gold processing: History: The technique of amalgamation, alloying with mercury to improve the recovery of gold, was discovered at about this time.

  • Amália (Portuguese singer)

    Amália da Piedade Rebordão Rodrigues, Portuguese singer whose haunting and passionate renditions of her homeland’s melancholic traditional form of music known as fado brought her international fame. Amália, as she was known to her fans, debuted as a fadista while still a teenager. By the time she

  • Amalia: A Romance of the Argentine (novel by Mármol)

    Latin American literature: Romanticism: >Amalia: A Romance of the Argentine), by the Argentine José Mármol. Villaverde’s vast narrative centres on the heroine, Cecilia, a mulatto so light-skinned that she can pass for white, who is in love with Leonardo, white, rich, and, unbeknownst to them, her half-brother. Cecilia Valdés…

  • Amalienborg (architectural complex, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    Amalienborg, residential square in Copenhagen, Den., built during the reign (1746–66) of King Frederick V and comprising four mansions and the octagonal courtyard surrounded by them. The complex was designed and constructed by the Danish architect Nicolai Eigtved, who also designed numerous other

  • Amalienborg (United States Virgin Islands)

    Charlotte Amalie, city, capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands and of St. Thomas Island, situated at the head of St. Thomas Harbor on the island’s southern shore. The largest city in the Virgin Islands, it is built on three low volcanic spurs called Frenchman Hill (Foretop Hill), Berg Hill (Maintop),

  • Amalienburg (building, Munich, Germany)

    Rococo: …example, the refined and delicate Amalienburg (1734–39), in the park of Nymphenburg, and the Residenztheater (1750–53; rebuilt after World War II), both by François de Cuvilliés. Among the finest German Rococo pilgrimage churches are the Vierzehnheiligen (1743–72), near Lichtenfels, in Bavaria, designed by Balthasar

  • Amalric (lord of Montfort)

    Montfort Family: Montfort-l’Amaury took its name from Amaury, or Amalric (d. c. 1053), the builder of the castle there, whose father had been invested with the lordship by Hugh Capet. Amaury’s grandson Simon (d. 1181 or later) married Amicia, ultimately the heiress of the English earldom of Leicester, and it was through…

  • Amalric I (king of Jerusalem)

    Amalric I, king of Jerusalem from 1163 to 1174, a strong ruler who protected the rights of vassals and helped prevent Muslim unity around the Holy Land. Amalric, the son of King Fulk of Jerusalem, had been count of Jaffa and Ascalon before succeeding his elder brother Baldwin III on the throne in

  • Amalric II (king of Jerusalem)

    Amalric II, king of Cyprus (1194–1205) and of Jerusalem (1197–1205) who ably ruled the two separated kingdoms. Amalric had been constable of Palestine before he was summoned by the Franks in Cyprus to become king there after the death of his brother Guy of Lusignan. Amalric planned a close alliance

  • Amalric of Lusignan (king of Jerusalem)

    Amalric II, king of Cyprus (1194–1205) and of Jerusalem (1197–1205) who ably ruled the two separated kingdoms. Amalric had been constable of Palestine before he was summoned by the Franks in Cyprus to become king there after the death of his brother Guy of Lusignan. Amalric planned a close alliance

  • Amalrik, Andrei Alekseyevich (Soviet-born historian, playwright, and dissident)

    Andrey Alekseyevich Amalrik, Soviet-born historian, playwright, and political dissident who was twice exiled to Siberia and was imprisoned in a labour camp before being granted an exit visa in 1976. Amalrik first came into conflict with the authorities as a student; his university thesis was

  • Amalrik, Andrey Alekseyevich (Soviet-born historian, playwright, and dissident)

    Andrey Alekseyevich Amalrik, Soviet-born historian, playwright, and political dissident who was twice exiled to Siberia and was imprisoned in a labour camp before being granted an exit visa in 1976. Amalrik first came into conflict with the authorities as a student; his university thesis was

  • Amalthaea (Greek nymph)

    Amalthaea, in Greek (originally Cretan) mythology, the foster mother of Zeus, king of the gods. She is sometimes represented as the goat that suckled the infant god in a cave in Crete, sometimes as a nymph who fed him the milk of a goat. This goat having broken off one of its horns, Amalthaea

  • Amalthea (satellite of Jupiter)

    Amalthea, small, potato-shaped moon of the planet Jupiter and the only Jovian satellite other than the four discovered by Galileo in 1610 to have been found by direct visual observation (as opposed to photography or electronic imaging) from Earth. It was discovered in 1892 by the American

  • Amambaí Mountains (mountains, South America)

    Amambaí Mountains, highlands in western Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil, and eastern Paraguay. Extending south-southwest initially as the Maracaju Mountains for approximately 200 miles (320 km) from Campo Grande, the capital of Mato Grosso do Sul, they form the western side of the Brazilian

  • Amambaí, Serra de (mountains, South America)

    Amambaí Mountains, highlands in western Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil, and eastern Paraguay. Extending south-southwest initially as the Maracaju Mountains for approximately 200 miles (320 km) from Campo Grande, the capital of Mato Grosso do Sul, they form the western side of the Brazilian

  • Amambay, Cordillera de (mountains, South America)

    Amambaí Mountains, highlands in western Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil, and eastern Paraguay. Extending south-southwest initially as the Maracaju Mountains for approximately 200 miles (320 km) from Campo Grande, the capital of Mato Grosso do Sul, they form the western side of the Brazilian

  • Amami (Japan)

    Amami Great Island: Amami (formerly Naze), the largest city, has a scientific research station and hospitals for senior citizens and mentally handicapped children. Amami and Setouchi are domestic shipping ports, and Setouchi has a museum. An airport is situated on Cape Kasari, and a highway connects Kasari and…

  • Amami Great Island (island, Japan)

    Amami Great Island, largest island in the Amami chain of the northern Ryukyu Islands, in Kagoshima ken (prefecture), Japan. Most of the 275-square-mile (712-square-km) island is mountainous and forested. A quasi-national park protects landscapes at the higher elevations. Mount Yūwan is the highest

  • Amami islands (island group, Japan)

    Ryukyu Islands: …into three major groups: the Amami island chain in the north, the central Okinawa islands, and the Sakishima islands in the south. Administratively, the Ryukyus are part of Japan, the Amami group constituting a southern extension of Kyushu’s Kagoshima prefecture (ken) and the Okinawa and Sakishima islands making up Okinawa…

  • Amami Ōshima (island, Japan)

    Amami Great Island, largest island in the Amami chain of the northern Ryukyu Islands, in Kagoshima ken (prefecture), Japan. Most of the 275-square-mile (712-square-km) island is mountainous and forested. A quasi-national park protects landscapes at the higher elevations. Mount Yūwan is the highest

  • Amami rabbit (mammal)

    rabbit: Diversity and conservation status: The Amami rabbit lives only in forests on two small islands (Amami and Tokunoshima) of southern Japan. Its fragmented population of about 5,400 animals is declining owing to habitat destruction and predation by introduced mongooses and by feral dogs and cats. The rabbits most threatened with…

  • Aman (Israeli intelligence agency)

    intelligence: Israel: …Forces, commonly referred to as Military Intelligence (or Aman), constitutes a third major Israeli intelligence organization. Some observers view it as a rival to Mossad, and conflicts between the two agencies have been reported. Its chief is the military intelligence adviser to the minister of defense.

  • Aman-Jean, Édmond-François (French painter)

    Georges Seurat: …a studio with another painter, Édmond-François Aman-Jean, who then joined him in Lehmann’s class. But Seurat and Aman-Jean departed from the policies of the École des Beaux-Arts in admiring the warm landscapes of Jean-Baptiste Millet at the Louvre. The two friends often frequented dance halls and cabarets in the evening,…

  • Amana (Egyptian god)

    Amon, Egyptian deity who was revered as king of the gods. Amon may have been originally one of the eight deities of the Hermopolite creation myth; his cult reached Thebes, where he became the patron of the pharaohs by the reign of Mentuhotep I (2008–1957 bce). At that date he was already identified

  • Amana Church Society

    Amana Colonies: The Amana Church Society, separately organized in 1932, continues its pietistic traditions, emphasizes Bible study and prayer, and remains the dominant force in the community. Simple worship services are conducted in German in unadorned village churches. The Amana Church Society, which is governed by elected elders…

  • Amana Colonies (settlement, Iowa, United States)

    Amana Colonies, settlement in Iowa county, east-central Iowa, U.S. It lies near the Iowa River, 20 miles (32 km) west-northwest of Iowa City, and comprises a group of seven small villages: Amana, East Amana, Middle Amana, High Amana, West Amana, South Amana, and Homestead. Amana developed from the

  • Amana Society (American corporation)

    Amana Colonies: …a joint-stock corporation, called the Amana Society, with the workers as stockholders. In addition to its farms, the Amana Society operates factories that produce woolens, furniture, wines, bakery goods, and meat specialties. Amana Refrigeration, Inc., formerly a division of the Amana Society, manufactures refrigerators, freezers, and microwave ovens. The Amana…

  • Amanat wa-iʿtiqadat (work by Saʿadia ben Joseph)

    Judaism: Saʿadia ben Joseph: …Kitāb al-amānāt wa al-iʿtiqādāt (Beliefs and Opinions), is modeled on similar Muʿtazilite treatises and on the Muʿtazilite classification of theological subject matter known as the Five Principles.

  • Amanat, Agha Hasan (Pakistani poet)

    South Asian arts: Theatre in Pakistan: …drama written by the poet Agha Hasan Amanat and produced in 1855 in the palace courtyard of the last nawab of Oudh, Wajid Ali Shah. The story deals with the love of a fairy and Prince Gulfam. The fairy takes her lover to heaven where the angry and jealous Indra…

  • AMANDA (research project)

    Antarctica: Climate: …on Earth is AMANDA, the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array. This involves an array of hundreds of optical devices set at depths of up to 1.2 miles (2 km) in the ice below the South Pole. It is essentially a telescope built within the ice sheet to detect high-energy…

  • Amanda Smith Industrial School for Girls (orphanage, Harvey, Illinois, United States)

    Amanda Smith: …Illinois and chartered as the Amanda Smith Industrial School for Girls. It was destroyed by fire in 1918.

  • Amandava amandava (bird)

    Avadavat, (species Amandava, or Estrilda, amandava), plump, 8-centimetre- (3-inch-) long bird of the waxbill (q.v.) group (order Passeriformes), a popular cage bird. The avadavat is abundant in marshes and meadows of southern Asia (introduced in Hawaii). The male, in breeding plumage, is bright

  • Amandava formosa (bird)

    munia: …Thailand to Java and the green munia, or green tiger finch (Amandava formosa), of India. The white-throated munia is also called silverbill, as are other birds with silver bills. For red munia, see avadavat.

  • Amandiers sont morts de leurs blessures, Les (work by Ben Jelloun)

    Tahar Ben Jelloun: …the same year, he published Les Amandiers sont morts de leurs blessures (“The Almond Trees Are Dead from Their Wounds”)—poems and stories on his grandmother’s death, the Palestinian question, North African immigration to France, love, and eroticism. A third novel, Moha le fou, Moha le sage (1978; “Moha the Fool,…

  • Amangku Buwono I (Southeast Asian ruler)

    Gianti Agreement: …Mangkubumi, later known as Sultan Amangku Buwono I, who built his palace in Jogjakarta. Raden Mas Said signed a treaty with the company in 1757, which entitled him to have a part of eastern Mataram. He was thenceforth known as Mangkunegara I.

  • Amanishakhete (queen of Nubia)

    Nubia: …in 45 bce of Queen Amanishakhete. She and her immediate successors temporarily arrested the loss of Egyptian culture, but thereafter it continued unchecked. Meanwhile, in 23 bce, a Roman army under Gaius Petronius destroyed Napata.

  • amanita (fungus)

    Amanita, (genus Amanita), genus of several hundred species of mushrooms in the family Amanitaceae (order Agaricales, kingdom Fungi). Some species of Amanita are poisonous to humans. The amanitas typically have white spores, a ring on the stem slightly below the cap, a veil (volva) torn as the cap

  • Amanita (fungus)

    Amanita, (genus Amanita), genus of several hundred species of mushrooms in the family Amanitaceae (order Agaricales, kingdom Fungi). Some species of Amanita are poisonous to humans. The amanitas typically have white spores, a ring on the stem slightly below the cap, a veil (volva) torn as the cap

  • Amanita bisporigera (mushroom)

    amanita: …are the destroying angels (A. bisporigera, A. ocreata, A. verna, and A. virosa). They develop a large white fruiting body and are found in forests during wet periods in summer and autumn. Death cap (A. phalloides), also deadly, is found in woods or their borders. It has a green…

  • Amanita brunnescens (mushroom)

    amanita: Other poisonous species include the brown American star-footed amanita (A. brunnescens) and the panther cap (A. pantherina). Common edible species include Caesar’s mushroom (A. caesarea), the blusher mushroom (A. rubescens), and the grisette (A. vaginata). See also mushroom poisoning.

  • Amanita muscaria (mushroom)

    bufotenine: …the fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria) and the tropical American tree Piptadenia peregrina, the seeds of which were used at the time of the early Spanish explorations by the Indians of Trinidad and of the Orinoco Plain to make the hallucinogenic snuff called cohoba, or yopo.

  • Amanita ocreata (mushroom)

    amanita: bisporigera, A. ocreata, A. verna, and A. virosa). They develop a large white fruiting body and are found in forests during wet periods in summer and autumn. Death cap (A. phalloides), also deadly, is found in woods or their borders. It has a green or brown…

  • Amanita pantherina (fungus)

    amanita: brunnescens) and the panther cap (A. pantherina). Common edible species include Caesar’s mushroom (A. caesarea), the blusher mushroom (A. rubescens), and the grisette (A. vaginata). See also mushroom poisoning.

  • Amanita phalloides (mushroom)

    mushroom poisoning: …cause poisoning are Amanita muscaria, A. phalloides, and the four white Amanita species called destroying angels. The ingestion of A. muscaria (fly agaric), which contains muscarine and other toxic alkaloids, is soon followed by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, perspiration, watering of the eyes, slowed and difficult breathing, dilated pupils,…

  • Your preference has been recorded
    Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
    Subscribe Today!