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  • Admiral Broadway Revue, The (American television show)

    Sid Caesar: …producer Max Liebman, Caesar created The Admiral Broadway Revue, a 90-minute live television variety show with an emphasis on Caesar’s comedy routines. Although the show was canceled after 17 weeks, most of the elements of The Admiral Broadway Revue were resurrected in Your Show of Shows, which debuted the following…

  • Admiral carpet (Spanish carpet)

    Admiral carpet, any of a number of 14th- or 15th-century carpets handwoven in Spain, probably at Letur or at Liétor in Murcia. The carpets were made with the Spanish knot, tied on a single warp and set in staggered rows on adjacent warps. In most cases the carpets show heraldic shields with coats

  • Admiral Graf von Spee (battleship)

    Graf Spee, German pocket battleship of 10,000 tons launched in 1936. The Graf Spee was more heavily gunned than any cruiser and had a top speed of 25 knots and an endurance of 12,500 miles (20,000 km). After sinking several merchant ships in the Atlantic, the Graf Spee was sighted on Dec. 13, 1939,

  • Admiral of the Ocean Sea (work by Morison)

    Samuel Eliot Morison: …Maritime History of Massachusetts (1921); Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1942), a biography of Columbus for which Morison was awarded a Pulitzer Prize; John Paul Jones (1959), which also received a Pulitzer; The Oxford History of the American People (1965); the monumental History of U.S. Naval Operations in World War…

  • Admiral Scheer (German battleship)

    Theodor Krancke: …command of the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer, which raided Allied maritime commerce over the next two years. He was promoted to rear admiral (1941), vice admiral (1942), and admiral (1943), and he served as a naval liaison officer at Adolf Hitler’s command headquarters in 1942–43. Krancke commanded the German naval…

  • Admiral’s Cup (yachting)

    Admiral’s Cup, racing trophy awarded to the winner of a biennial international competition among teams of sailing yachts; it was established in 1957 by the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) of Great Britain. Teams of three yachts rated at 25 to 70 feet (8 to 21 m) by RORC rules (formerly 30 to 60 feet

  • Admiral’s Men (English theatrical company)

    Admiral’s Men, a theatrical company in Elizabethan and Jacobean England. About 1576–79 they were known as Lord Howard’s Men, so called after their patron Charles Howard, 1st earl of Nottingham, 2nd Baron Howard of Effingham. In 1585, when Lord Howard became England’s lord high admiral, the company

  • Admiral, the (American basketball player)

    David Robinson, American basketball player who won two National Basketball Association (NBA) titles with the San Antonio Spurs (1999, 2003). Robinson played basketball at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., leading the academy team to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

  • Admirals (portrait series by Lely)

    Sir Peter Lely: …the portrait series of the Admirals (1666–67) at Greenwich, the best of them rugged and severely masculine characterizations. Lely’s late works are marred by stylistic mannerisms and decreasing vitality.

  • Admirals All (work by Newbolt)

    Sir Henry Newbolt: The appearance of his ballads, Admirals All (1897), which included the stirring “Drake’s Drum,” created his literary reputation. These were followed by other volumes collected in Poems: New and Old (1912; rev. ed. 1919). During World War I he was comptroller of wireless and cables and was later commissioned to…

  • Admiralty (British government)

    Admiralty, in Great Britain, until 1964, the government department that managed naval affairs. In that year the three service departments—the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Air Ministry—were abolished as separate departments and merged in a new unified Ministry of Defence, and the Admiralty w

  • admiralty

    Maritime law, the body of legal rules that governs ships and shipping. In English-speaking countries, “admiralty” is sometimes used synonymously, but in a strict sense the term refers to the jurisdiction and procedural law of courts whose origins may be traced to the office of Admiral. Although

  • Admiralty (building, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    St. Petersburg: Admiralty Side: The district centres on the Admiralty. This, the nucleus of Peter’s original city, was reconstructed in 1806–23 by Andreyan D. Zakharov as a development of the earlier building of Ivan K. Korobov, which itself had been remodeled in 1727–38 but retained the layout of the original. Its elegant spire, topped…

  • Admiralty Board of the Defence Council (British government)

    Admiralty, in Great Britain, until 1964, the government department that managed naval affairs. In that year the three service departments—the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Air Ministry—were abolished as separate departments and merged in a new unified Ministry of Defence, and the Admiralty w

  • admiralty brass (alloy)

    brass: Characteristics of the alloy: …easily machined; the naval and admiralty brasses, in which a small amount of tin improves resistance to corrosion by seawater; and the aluminum brasses, which provide strength and corrosion resistance where the naval brasses may fail.

  • Admiralty Court (building, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: Administration: …the council moved to the Prinsenhof, a onetime convent that later became the Admiralty Court. In the mid-1980s a new city hall and opera house were constructed on the north bank of the Amstel River, at Waterloo Square. In 1926 Herengracht 502, which was built for a director of the…

  • Admiralty Inlet (inlet, Canada)

    Admiralty Inlet, passage of water located between Brodeur and Borden peninsulas and indenting for 230 miles (370 km) the northwest coast of Baffin Island in the Baffin region of Nunavut territory, Canada. The inlet, leading southward from Lancaster Sound of Baffin Bay, is 2 to 20 miles (3 to 32 km)

  • Admiralty Island (island, Alaska, United States)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the southern ranges: …Range and the mountains of Admiralty, Baranof, and Chicagof islands. Those islands have small glaciers and rugged coastlines indented by fjords. The archipelago is composed of southeast–northwest-trending belts of Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary, metasedimentary, and volcanic rocks. Metamorphic facies rocks are exposed in the eastern sectors. Those have been intruded…

  • Admiralty Islands (islands, Papua New Guinea)

    Admiralty Islands, islands in Papua New Guinea, southwestern Pacific Ocean, an extension of the Bismarck Archipelago comprising about 40 islands. The group lies about 190 miles (300 km) off the northern coast of Papua New Guinea. The volcanic Manus Island constitutes the majority of its land area

  • Admiralty Landships Committee (British military body)

    tank: World War I: …in the formation of an Admiralty Landships Committee. A series of experiments by this committee led in September 1915 to the construction of the first tank, called “Little Willie.” A second model, called “Big Willie,” quickly followed. Designed to cross wide trenches, it was accepted by the British Army, which…

  • admiralty law

    Maritime law, the body of legal rules that governs ships and shipping. In English-speaking countries, “admiralty” is sometimes used synonymously, but in a strict sense the term refers to the jurisdiction and procedural law of courts whose origins may be traced to the office of Admiral. Although

  • admiralty mile (unit of measurement)

    mile: A nautical mile was originally defined as the length on the Earth’s surface of one minute (160 of a degree) of arc along a meridian (north-south line of longitude). Because of a slight flattening of the Earth in polar latitudes, however, the measurement of a nautical…

  • Admiralty Screen (architectural work by Adam)

    Robert Adam: The Adam style: …work in London was the Admiralty Screen (c. 1760). Through the influence of John Stuart, 3rd earl of Bute, a friend of King George III, he was appointed architect of the King’s Works in November 1761 along with William Chambers, his principal architectural rival. By the early 1760s he had…

  • Admiralty Side (district, Saint Petersburg, Russia)

    St. Petersburg: Admiralty Side: Much of St. Petersburg’s historical and cultural heritage is concentrated on the Admiralty Side. The district centres on the Admiralty. This, the nucleus of Peter’s original city, was reconstructed in 1806–23 by Andreyan D. Zakharov as a development of the earlier building of…

  • Admiralty, Board of (British government)

    Admiralty, in Great Britain, until 1964, the government department that managed naval affairs. In that year the three service departments—the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Air Ministry—were abolished as separate departments and merged in a new unified Ministry of Defence, and the Admiralty w

  • Admiralty, High Court of (English legal body)

    High Court of Admiralty, in England, formerly the court presided over by the deputy of the admiral of the fleet. The Black Book of the Admiralty says it was founded in the reign of Edward I, but it actually appears to have been established by Edward III about 1360. At this time the court seems to

  • admissibility (law)

    evidence: Relevance and admissibility: In civil proceedings in the common-law countries, evidence is both ascertained and simultaneously restricted by the assertions of the parties. If the allegations of one party are not disputed or contested by the other, or if the allegations are even admitted, then no proof…

  • Admission (film by Weitz [2013])

    Tina Fey: …starred in the romantic comedy Admission (2013), as a university admissions officer thrown into a midlife crisis.

  • admission (law)

    evidence: The hearsay rule: …documents, and to confessions and admissions by parties.

  • admission fee (business)

    museum: Entrance fees: Many museums charge entrance fees to help finance operations—even in some countries, such as the United Kingdom, that previously had a strong tradition of free entry to museums. Some museums charge admission fees only for major exhibitions. Others have introduced a system of…

  • Admit Impediment (poetry by Ponsot)

    Marie Ponsot: Her second collection of poetry, Admit Impediment, was published in 1981. With Rosemary Deen she coauthored two books on writing—Beat Not the Poor Desk: Writing: What to Teach, How to Teach It, and Why (1982) and The Common Sense: What to Write, How to Write It, and Why (1985). These…

  • admittance (electronics)

    electrical impedance: …impedance, 1/Z, is called the admittance and is expressed in terms of the unit of conductance, the mho unit (ohm spelled backward).

  • admitted liability insurance

    insurance: Aviation insurance: …of coverage has been called admitted liability insurance.

  • admixture (social practice)

    Miscegenation, marriage or cohabitation by persons of different race. Theories that the anatomical disharmony of children resulted from miscegenation were discredited by 20th-century genetics and anthropology. Although it is now accepted that modern populations are the result of the continuous

  • Admonet nos (papal constitution)

    Saint Pius V: Papal reforms.: By the constitution Admonet Nos (March 29, 1567), he forbade the reinvestiture of fiefs—those landed estates held under feudal tenure that were intended to revert to the Holy See—and bound the cardinals by oath to observe it. In March 1569 Pius ordered the expulsion of the Jews from…

  • Admonition to Peace Concerning the Twelve Articles of the Peasants (work by Luther)

    Martin Luther: Controversies after the Diet of Worms: Luther wrote two responses—Admonition to Peace Concerning the Twelve Articles of the Peasants, which expressed sympathy for the peasants, and Against the Murderous and Robbing Hordes of the Peasants, which vehemently denounced them. Both works represented a shift away from his earlier vision of reform as encompassing societal…

  • Admonition to the Military (Japanese military history)

    Yamagata Aritomo: Early career: In 1878 Yamagata issued “Admonition to the Military,” a set of instructions to soldiers that emphasized the old virtues of bravery, loyalty, and obedience to the emperor and was intended to counteract democratic and liberal trends. After separating the Operations Department from the Army Ministry and reorganizing the General…

  • Admonition to the Parliament (Puritan manifesto [1572])

    Admonition to Parliament, Puritan manifesto, published in 1572 and written by the London clergymen John Field and Thomas Wilcox, that demanded that Queen Elizabeth I restore the “purity” of New Testament worship in the Church of England and eliminate the remaining Roman Catholic elements and

  • Admonitions of an Egyptian Sage, The (work by Ipuwer)

    Ipuwer: Ipuwer’s manuscript, often called “The Admonitions of an Egyptian Sage,” is especially valuable for its commentary on woeful contemporary political and economic situations, perhaps those prevalent in Egypt during the First Intermediate Period (c. 2130–1938 bce).

  • Admonitions of the Court Instructress, The (work by Gu Kaizhi)

    Chinese painting: Three Kingdoms (220–280) and Six Dynasties (220–589): …3rd-century didactic text “Nüshizhen” (“Admonitions of the Court Instructress”), by Zhang Hua. In this hand scroll, narrative illustration is bound strictly to the text (as if used as a mnemonic device): the advice to imperial concubines to bear sons to the emperor, for instance, is accompanied by a delightful…

  • admonitory mask

    mask: Social and religious uses: … and have been used to admonish. Common in China, Africa, Oceania, and North America, admonitory masks usually completely cover the features of the wearer. Some African peoples hold that the first mask to be used was an admonitory one. In one version of the mask origin, a child, repeatedly told…

  • Admont Bible (religious manuscript)

    Western painting: Germany and Austria: …Bible at Michaelbeuern and the Admont Bible of 1140–50. The latter manuscript—which features large, full-page compositions dominated by tall turning figures, unreal landscapes, and bright colours—is a parallel phenomenon to the great contemporary English books, such as the Lambeth Bible and the Psalter of Henry of Blois. Each shows a…

  • ADN (political party, Bolivia)

    Hugo Bánzer Suárez: …the Acción Democrática Nacionalista (ADN; Nationalist Democratic Action), which became one of the country’s most powerful parties. Bánzer ran for president in 1985 and won in the popular vote but lost in the subsequent run-off vote in the country’s Congress. He was successful in his bid for the presidency in…

  • ʿAdnān (Arabian legendary figure)

    Arabia: Ethnic groups: …and a northern Arabian ancestor, ʿAdnān, forebear of the “Arabicized” Arabs (al-ʿArab al-Mustaʿribah). A tradition, seemingly derived from the Bible, makes ʿAdnān, and perhaps Qaḥṭān also, descend from Ismāʿīl (Ishmael), son of Abraham. The rivalry between the two groups spread, with the Muslim conquests, beyond Arabia; it even recurred in…

  • adnation (plant anatomy)

    angiosperm: General features: …petals in the morning glory; adnation is the fusion of different organs—for example, the stamens fused to petals in the mint family (Lamiaceae). The basic floral pattern consists of alternating whorls of organs positioned concentrically: from outside inward, sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels (Figure 12). It is possible in most…

  • Adňnīs (Syrian-born Lebanese poet and literary critic)

    Adonis, Syrian-born Lebanese poet and literary critic who was a leader of the modernist movement in contemporary Arabic poetry. Adonis was born into a family of farmers and had no formal education until he was in his teens, though his father taught him much about classical Arabic literature. At age

  • ADNOC (Emirian company)

    United Arab Emirates: Resources and power: …in the federation through the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC). Abu Dhabi is responsible for about 95 percent of the country’s oil production, and production of petroleum and natural gas contributes about one-third of the nation’s GDP, even though the oil and gas sector employs only a tiny fraction…

  • Ado (president of Côte d’Ivoire)

    Alassane Ouattara, Ivoirian economist and politician who was elected president of Côte d’Ivoire in 2010. Despite Ouattara’s victory, the incumbent, Laurent Gbagbo, refused to step down, and the two established parallel administrations that both claimed legitimacy—until Gbagbo’s arrest in April 2011

  • Ado Kyrou on Buñuel

    In a list of contributors to the Encyclopædia Britannica published in 1985, Ado Kyrou was described, simply, as a “writer and motion-picture and television director.” He was also credited with the books Le Surréalisme au cinéma (1953) and Luis Buñuel (1962). Born in Greece in 1923, Kyrou—whose full

  • Ado-Ekiti (Nigeria)

    Ado-Ekiti, town, capital of Ekiti state, southwestern Nigeria. It lies in the Yoruba Hills, at the intersection of roads from Akure, Ilawe Ekiti, Ilesha, Ila Orangun, and Ikare, and is situated 92 miles (148 km) east of Ibadan. An urban and industrial centre of the region, it was founded by the

  • adobe

    Adobe, a heavy clay soil used to make sun-dried bricks. The term, Spanish-Moorish in origin, also denotes the bricks themselves. Adobe is a mixture of clay, sand, and silt with good plastic qualities that will dry to a hard uniform mass. In areas with arid or semiarid climates, adobe construction

  • Adobe Acrobat (computer program)

    Adobe Inc.: Application software: …company initiative in the 1990s—the Adobe Acrobat product family—was designed to provide a standard format for electronic document distribution. Once a document had been converted to Acrobat’s portable document format (PDF), regardless of its origins, users of any major computer operating system could read and print it, with formatting, typography,…

  • Adobe Flash (animation software)

    Adobe Flash, animation software produced by Adobe Systems Incorporated. The development of Adobe Flash software can be traced back to American software developer Jonathan Gay’s first experiments with writing programs on his Apple II computer in high school during the 1980s. Before long, Gay had

  • adobe house

    Adobe, a heavy clay soil used to make sun-dried bricks. The term, Spanish-Moorish in origin, also denotes the bricks themselves. Adobe is a mixture of clay, sand, and silt with good plastic qualities that will dry to a hard uniform mass. In areas with arid or semiarid climates, adobe construction

  • Adobe Illustrator (software)

    Adobe Illustrator, graphics computer application software produced by Adobe Systems Incorporated that allows users to create refined drawings, designs, and layouts. Illustrator, released in 1987, is one of many Adobe innovations that revolutionized graphic design. Adobe Systems was founded in 1982

  • Adobe Inc. (American company)

    Adobe Inc., American developer of printing, publishing, and graphics software. Adobe was instrumental in the creation of the desktop publishing industry through the introduction of its PostScript printer language. Its headquarters are located in San Jose, California. The company was founded in 1982

  • Adobe Media Player (computer software)

    Adobe Inc.: Application software: In 2008 Adobe Media Player was introduced as a competitor to Apple’s iTunes, Windows Media Player, and RealPlayer from RealNetworks, Inc. In addition to playing audio and video files in a variety of formats on personal computers, Adobe Media Player was adopted by several television networks for…

  • Adobe Photoshop (software)

    Adobe Photoshop, computer application software used to edit and manipulate digital images. Photoshop was developed in 1987 by the American brothers Thomas and John Knoll, who sold the distribution license to Adobe Systems Incorporated in 1988. Photoshop was originally conceived as a subset of the

  • Adobe PostScript (computer language)

    PostScript, a page-description language developed in the early 1980s by Adobe Systems Incorporated on the basis of work at Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). Such languages describe documents in terms that can be interpreted by a personal computer in order to display the document on its screen

  • Adobe Systems Incorporated (American company)

    Adobe Inc., American developer of printing, publishing, and graphics software. Adobe was instrumental in the creation of the desktop publishing industry through the introduction of its PostScript printer language. Its headquarters are located in San Jose, California. The company was founded in 1982

  • Adoian, Vosdanik (American painter)

    Arshile Gorky, American painter, important as the direct link between the European Surrealist painters and the painters of the American Abstract Expressionist movement. Gorky’s early life was disrupted when his father abandoned Turkey, his wife, and his family in order to avoid service in the

  • Adoimara (social class)

    Afar: …Asaimara (“Red Men”) and the Adoimara (“White Men”), constitute the landowning, titled nobles and the lower-class tenants, respectively.

  • adolescence

    Adolescence, transitional phase of growth and development between childhood and adulthood. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as any person between ages 10 and 19. This age range falls within WHO’s definition of young people, which refers to individuals between ages 10 and

  • Adolescence (work by Hall)

    G. Stanley Hall: …largest and most important works, Adolescence (1904). Despite opposition, Hall, as an early proponent of psychoanalysis, invited Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung to the conferences celebrating Clark University’s 20th anniversary (1909). Hall was a leading spirit in the founding of the American Psychological Association and served as its first president…

  • adolescent

    Adolescence, transitional phase of growth and development between childhood and adulthood. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as any person between ages 10 and 19. This age range falls within WHO’s definition of young people, which refers to individuals between ages 10 and

  • adolescent cystinosis (pathology)

    cystinosis: Intermediate cystinosis is similar to the nephropathic form but has a later onset, typically in adolescence, with complete kidney failure occurring usually between ages 15 and 25.

  • Adolescent, The (work by Dostoyevsky)

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky: A Writer’s Diary and other works: …Grazhdanin to write Podrostok (1875; A Raw Youth, also known as The Adolescent), a relatively unsuccessful and diffuse novel describing a young man’s relations with his natural father.

  • Adolf (German king)

    Adolf, German king from May 5, 1292, to June 23, 1298, when he was deposed in favour of his Habsburg opponent, Albert I. Adolf, who was count of Nassau from 1277 and a mercenary soldier of repute, was chosen king at Frankfurt by the German electors, who preferred him to Albert as successor to

  • Adolf (grand duke of Luxembourg)

    Adolf, duke of Nassau from 1839 to 1867, who, as grand duke of Luxembourg from 1890 to 1905, was the first ruler of that autonomous duchy. The son of Duke William of Nassau-Weilburg and Charlotte of Saxony, Adolf became duke of Nassau upon his father’s death (1839). Educated in Vienna and a

  • Adolf Frederick (king of Sweden)

    Adolf Frederick, king of Sweden from 1751 to 1771. He was the son of Christian Augustus (1673–1726), Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp, and of Albertina Frederica of Baden-Durlach. While Adolf Frederick was bishop of Lübeck (1727–50), he administered Holstein-Kiel (1739–45) during the minority of

  • Adolf Fredrik (king of Sweden)

    Adolf Frederick, king of Sweden from 1751 to 1771. He was the son of Christian Augustus (1673–1726), Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp, and of Albertina Frederica of Baden-Durlach. While Adolf Frederick was bishop of Lübeck (1727–50), he administered Holstein-Kiel (1739–45) during the minority of

  • Adolf Friedrich (duke of Mecklenburg)

    Virunga Mountains: …from the major expedition of Adolf Friedrich, duke of Mecklenburg, which was undertaken in 1907–08. Modern access to the western volcanoes is from Goma and Gisenyi (Rwanda); the remaining mountains are located within the circuit of roads connecting Goma and Rutshuru (Congo), Kisoro (Uganda), and Ruhengeri and Gisenyi (Rwanda).

  • Adolf Friedrich (king of Sweden)

    Adolf Frederick, king of Sweden from 1751 to 1771. He was the son of Christian Augustus (1673–1726), Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp, and of Albertina Frederica of Baden-Durlach. While Adolf Frederick was bishop of Lübeck (1727–50), he administered Holstein-Kiel (1739–45) during the minority of

  • Adolf of Cologne (archbishop of Cologne)

    Philip: …opposing party, led by Archbishop Adolf of Cologne, elected Otto, a son of Henry the Lion of Brunswick of the rival Welf dynasty, king in June of that year. Otto was crowned at Aachen, the proper place for the ceremony, by Archbishop Adolf. Philip’s coronation, by another prelate, did not…

  • Adolf the Superman Swallows Gold and Spouts Tin (photomontage by Heartfield)

    John Heartfield: …most-recognized photomontages date to 1932: Adolf the Superman Swallows Gold and Spouts Tin, a picture of Hitler with his mouth open speaking and a chest X-ray superimposed over his torso, which reveals an esophagus made of gold coins and a pile of coins in the pit of his stomach; and…

  • Adolf Wilhelm August Karl Friedrich (grand duke of Luxembourg)

    Adolf, duke of Nassau from 1839 to 1867, who, as grand duke of Luxembourg from 1890 to 1905, was the first ruler of that autonomous duchy. The son of Duke William of Nassau-Weilburg and Charlotte of Saxony, Adolf became duke of Nassau upon his father’s death (1839). Educated in Vienna and a

  • Adolf, count von Nassau (German king)

    Adolf, German king from May 5, 1292, to June 23, 1298, when he was deposed in favour of his Habsburg opponent, Albert I. Adolf, who was count of Nassau from 1277 and a mercenary soldier of repute, was chosen king at Frankfurt by the German electors, who preferred him to Albert as successor to

  • Adolph III (German count)

    Hamburg: Early settlement and medieval growth: …received from their feudal overlord, Adolph III of Schauenburg (Schaumburg), count of Holstein, a charter for the building of a new town, adjacent to the old one, with a harbour on the Alster River and with facilities for the use of the Elbe River as an outer roadstead. On May…

  • Adolph V of Berg (leader of Limburg)

    Limburg: …the rights of Limburg) and Adolph V of Berg (who had been granted those same rights by the Holy Roman emperor), Adolph was not strong enough to contest his rights militarily and sold them to John I of Brabant. After five years of war against Reinald and his ally, John…

  • Adolphe (novel by Constant)

    Adolphe, novel by Benjamin Constant, published in 1816. Written in a lucid classical style, Adolphe describes in minute analytical detail a young man’s passion for a woman older than himself. A forerunner of the modern psychological novel, it is a thinly disguised account of the end of Constant’s

  • Adomnan, Saint (Irish abbot and scholar)

    Saint Adamnan, ; feast day September 23), abbot and scholar, particularly noted as the biographer of St. Columba. Nothing is known of Adamnan’s early life. In 679 he was elected abbot of Iona, the ninth in succession from St. Columba, the founder. While on a visit to Northumbria, he adopted the

  • Adonais (work by Shelley)

    Adonais, pastoral elegy by Percy Bysshe Shelley, written and published in 1821 to commemorate the death of his friend and fellow poet John Keats earlier that year. Referring to Adonis, the handsome young man of Greek mythology who was killed by a wild boar, the title was probably taken from Bion’s

  • Adone (work by Marino)

    Giambattista Marino: …a labour of 20 years, Adone (1623; definitive ed. by R. Balsamo-Crivelli, 1922; Adonis [selections]). Adone, an enormous poem (45,000 lines), relates, with many digressions, the love story of Venus and Adonis and shows the best and worst of Marino’s style. The best is found in brilliant passages, written in…

  • Adoni (India)

    Adoni, city, western Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies in the Rayalaseema uplands region, about 50 miles (80 km) west-southwest of Kurnool and some 140 miles (225 km) southwest of Hyderabad, Telangana. Adoni was once the stronghold for the rulers of the medieval Hindu kingdom of

  • Adonias Aguiar Filho (Brazilian author)

    Adonias Filho, novelist, essayist, journalist, and literary critic whose works of fiction embrace universal themes within the provincial setting of Brazil’s rural northeast. His literary career began in the early 1930s under the aegis of the Neo-Catholic writers’ group (Tasso da Silveira and A

  • Adonias Filho (Brazilian author)

    Adonias Filho, novelist, essayist, journalist, and literary critic whose works of fiction embrace universal themes within the provincial setting of Brazil’s rural northeast. His literary career began in the early 1930s under the aegis of the Neo-Catholic writers’ group (Tasso da Silveira and A

  • Adonic line (poetry)

    prosody: Quantitative metres: …a shorter line, called an Adonic, - ˘ ˘ - - .

  • Adonijah (biblical figure)

    Adonijah, in the Old Testament, the fourth son of David, the natural heir to the throne. David’s favourite wife, Bathsheba, organized an intrigue in favour of her son Solomon. Shortly after his accession, Solomon had Adonijah put to death on the ground that, by seeking to marry David’s concubine

  • Adonim (Jewish physician)

    Dunash Ben Tamim, Jewish physician and one of the first scholars to make a comparative study of the Hebrew and Arabic languages. He practiced medicine at the Fāṭimid court of al-Qayrawān, (now in Tunisia) and, like other educated Jews of his time, was versed in Hebrew. The work for which he is b

  • Adonina ha-Levi (Hebrew poet)

    Dunash Ben Labrat, Hebrew poet, grammarian, and polemicist who was the first to use Arabic metres in his verse, thus inaugurating a new mode in Hebrew poetry. His strictures on the Hebrew lexicon of Menahem ben Saruq provoked a quarrel that helped initiate a golden age in Hebrew philology. Dunash

  • Adonis (Greek mythology)

    Adonis, in Greek mythology, a youth of remarkable beauty, the favourite of the goddess Aphrodite (identified with Venus by the Romans). Traditionally, he was the product of the incestuous love Smyrna (Myrrha) entertained for her own father, the Syrian king Theias. Charmed by his beauty, Aphrodite

  • Adonis (Syrian-born Lebanese poet and literary critic)

    Adonis, Syrian-born Lebanese poet and literary critic who was a leader of the modernist movement in contemporary Arabic poetry. Adonis was born into a family of farmers and had no formal education until he was in his teens, though his father taught him much about classical Arabic literature. At age

  • Adonis annua (plant)

    Pheasant’s-eye, (species Adonis annua), annual herbaceous plant of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) native to Eurasia and grown in garden borders and for cut flowers. It is 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) tall and is noted for its small, red flowers with prominent dark

  • Adonis, Attis, Osiris (work by Frazer)

    myth: Ritual and other practices: Thus, in Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906) he stated that the mythical story of Attis’s self-castration was designed to explain the fact that the priests of Attis’s cult castrated themselves at his festival.

  • Adonis, Joe (American crime boss)

    Joe Adonis, major American crime-syndicate boss in New York and New Jersey. Born near Naples, Adonis came to America as a child and in the 1920s became a follower of Lucky Luciano. He was one of the assassins of crime czar Giuseppe Masseria in 1931, leading to Luciano’s supremacy in organized

  • Adonizedek (king of Jerusalem)

    Jerusalem: Ancient origins of the city: …biblical text mentions another king, Adonizedek, who headed an Amorite coalition and was vanquished by Joshua.

  • adoptee (kinship)

    Adoption, the act of establishing a person as parent to one who is not in fact or in law his child. Adoption is so widely recognized that it can be characterized as an almost worldwide institution with historical roots traceable to antiquity. In most ancient civilizations and in certain later

  • adoptees-rights movement (social movement)

    adoption: …in the 1970s, a growing adoptees-rights movement in the United States called for the repeal of confidentiality laws in most states that prevented adoptees as adults from viewing their adoption records, including their original birth certificates. In subsequent decades several states passed legislation that allowed adult adoptees access to their…

  • adoptianism (religion)

    Christianity: Aversion of heresy: the establishment of orthodoxy: …and in 18th-century England; “adoptionism” reappeared in Spain and France in the 8th and 9th centuries; and antimaterial dualism was revived among the Bulgarian Bogomils in the 10th century and among the Cathars of France and Italy in the 12th. Keen-eyed readers of theological literature can spot contemporary equivalents…

  • adoption (kinship)

    Adoption, the act of establishing a person as parent to one who is not in fact or in law his child. Adoption is so widely recognized that it can be characterized as an almost worldwide institution with historical roots traceable to antiquity. In most ancient civilizations and in certain later

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