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  • Adak (island, Alaska, United States)

    Aleutian Islands: History: Adak (formerly Adak Station) was the site of a naval station (1942–97), its military installations used as a base for mounting the Attu campaign in May 1943. Before the closure of the naval station, Adak was once Alaska’s sixth-largest city, with some 6,000 people. In…

  • Adak Station (island, Alaska, United States)

    Aleutian Islands: History: Adak (formerly Adak Station) was the site of a naval station (1942–97), its military installations used as a base for mounting the Attu campaign in May 1943. Before the closure of the naval station, Adak was once Alaska’s sixth-largest city, with some 6,000 people. In…

  • Adal (people)

    Afar, a people of the Horn of Africa who speak Afar (also known as ’Afar Af), a language of the Eastern Cushitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. They live in northeastern Ethiopia, southeastern Eritrea, and Djibouti, where, with the Issas, they are the dominant people. It is thought

  • Adal (historical state, East Africa)

    Adal, historic Islāmic state of eastern Africa, in the Danakil-Somali region southwest of the Gulf of Aden, with its capital at Harer (now in Ethiopia). Its rivalry with Christian Ethiopia began in the 14th century with minor border raids and skirmishes. In the 16th century, Adal rose briefly to

  • Adalbero (duke of Carinthia)

    Conrad II: …gave his oath to Duke Adalbero of Carinthia never to side against him. Thus, when Conrad fell out with Adalbero in 1035, Henry’s oath severely strained relations between father and son. Conrad managed to overcome his son’s partisanship only by humbling himself before him. In the end, Conrad’s determination prevailed,…

  • Adalbero of Ardennes (archbishop of Reims)

    Adalbero Of Ardennes, archbishop of Reims who, by declaring the Frankish crown to be elective rather than hereditary, paved the way for the accession of Hugh Capet in place of the Carolingian claimant, Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. Adalbero, a native of Lorraine, had opposed the attempts of the

  • Adalbero of Reims (archbishop of Reims)

    Adalbero Of Ardennes, archbishop of Reims who, by declaring the Frankish crown to be elective rather than hereditary, paved the way for the accession of Hugh Capet in place of the Carolingian claimant, Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. Adalbero, a native of Lorraine, had opposed the attempts of the

  • Adalbéron d’Ardenne (archbishop of Reims)

    Adalbero Of Ardennes, archbishop of Reims who, by declaring the Frankish crown to be elective rather than hereditary, paved the way for the accession of Hugh Capet in place of the Carolingian claimant, Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. Adalbero, a native of Lorraine, had opposed the attempts of the

  • Adalbéron de Reims (archbishop of Reims)

    Adalbero Of Ardennes, archbishop of Reims who, by declaring the Frankish crown to be elective rather than hereditary, paved the way for the accession of Hugh Capet in place of the Carolingian claimant, Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. Adalbero, a native of Lorraine, had opposed the attempts of the

  • Adalbert (archbishop of Bremen)

    Adalbert, German archbishop, the most brilliant of the medieval prince bishops of Bremen, and a leading member of the royal administration. The youngest son of Frederick, Count of Goseck (on the Saale River), Adalbert attended the cathedral school at Halberstadt, becoming subsequently subdeacon

  • Adalbert (king of Italy)

    Adalbert, Lombard king of Italy, who shared the throne for 11 years with his father, Berengar II, and after Berengar’s exile continued his father’s struggle against the German king and Holy Roman emperor Otto I. Adalbert joined his father in 946–947 in fighting the co-kings of Italy, Hugh of

  • Adalbert (archbishop of Mainz)

    Henry V: Rebellion soon broke out; Archbishop Adalbert of Mainz fomented unrest in the upper Rhineland, and the revolt of Lothar of Supplinburg (later to become king as Lothar III and emperor as Lothar II) in Saxony ended in 1115 in a severe defeat for Henry.

  • Adalbert (antipope)

    Albert, antipope in 1101. He was cardinal bishop of Silva Candida when elected early in 1101 as successor to the antipope Theodoric of Santa Ruffina, who had been set up against the legitimate pope, Paschal II, by an imperial faction supporting the Holy Roman emperor Henry IV in his struggle with

  • Adalbert, Adam, Graf von Neipperg (Austrian noble)

    Marie-Louise: …death that May, Marie-Louise married Adam Adalbert, count von Neipperg, having already borne him two children. Together they governed the duchies more liberally than did most other princes in Italy, though some authorities suggest that this resulted more from weakness of character than from policy. Josef von Werklein, however, who…

  • Adalbert, Saint (bishop of Prague)

    St. Adalbert, ; canonized 999; feast day, April 23), first bishop of Prague to be of Czech origin. Descended from the Slavník princes of Bohemia, he was trained in theology at Magdeburg (Germany). At his confirmation he received his name from St. Adalbert, first archbishop of Magdeburg. Elected as

  • Adalberto (king of Italy)

    Adalbert, Lombard king of Italy, who shared the throne for 11 years with his father, Berengar II, and after Berengar’s exile continued his father’s struggle against the German king and Holy Roman emperor Otto I. Adalbert joined his father in 946–947 in fighting the co-kings of Italy, Hugh of

  • Adalet ve Kalkınma Partisi (political party, Turkey)

    Justice and Development Party, political party that came to power in Turkey in the general elections of 2002. In spite of the party’s nonconfessional mandate, the AKP draws significant support from nonsecular Turks and has faced objections from some segments of Turkish society that it harbours an

  • adalimumab (medicine)

    bacteriophage: Role in laboratory research: Adalimumab (Humira), used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was the first fully human antibody made via phage display to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (approved in 2002). For their discoveries relating to phage display, Smith and Winter were awarded a…

  • Adam (biblical figures)

    Adam and Eve, in the Judeo-Christian and Islamic traditions, the original human couple, parents of the human race. In the Bible there are two accounts of their creation. According to the Priestly (P) history of the 5th or 6th century bce (Genesis 1:1–2:4), God on the sixth day of Creation created

  • Adam and Eve (engraving by Dürer)

    Albrecht Dürer: First journey to Italy: …efforts was the great engraving Adam and Eve (1504), in which he sought to bring the mystery of human beauty to an intellectually calculated ideal form. In all aspects Dürer’s art was becoming strongly classical. One of his most significant classical endeavours is his painting Altar of the Three Kings…

  • Adam and Eve (biblical figures)

    Adam and Eve, in the Judeo-Christian and Islamic traditions, the original human couple, parents of the human race. In the Bible there are two accounts of their creation. According to the Priestly (P) history of the 5th or 6th century bce (Genesis 1:1–2:4), God on the sixth day of Creation created

  • Adam and Eve and Pinch Me (work by Coppard)

    A.E. Coppard: …first book of short stories, Adam and Eve and Pinch Me, was published when he was 43. His talent was recognized and other collections of stories followed, including Fishmonger’s Fiddle (1925), which contained what is perhaps his best story, “The Higgler.” The charm of his stories lay in his poetic…

  • Adam and Eve in Paradise (painting by Bruegel and Rubens)

    Jan Bruegel the Elder: …human figures; an example is Adam and Eve in Paradise (1620).

  • Adam and Eve Reproached by the Lord (sculpture)

    Western sculpture: Carolingian and Ottonian periods: …interval in the episode of Adam and Eve reproached by the Lord has no precedent in the history of art. The influence of Classical art manifests itself clearly in the so-called Christ’s Column (12.8 feet [3.9 metres] high; c. 1020; St. Michael’s, Hildesheim), which, with its figures spiralling around the…

  • Adam and Eve, Feast of (Christian festival)

    Christmas tree: …the religious feast day of Adam and Eve. They hung wafers on it (symbolizing the eucharistic host, the Christian sign of redemption); in a later tradition the wafers were replaced by cookies of various shapes. Candles, symbolic of Christ as the light of the world, were often added. In the…

  • Adam and Eve, Life of (Jewish literature)

    Life of Adam and Eve, pseudepigraphal work (a noncanonical writing that in style and content resembles authentic biblical works), one of many Jewish and Christian stories that embellish the account of Adam and Eve as given in the biblical Genesis. Biography was an extremely popular literary genre

  • Adam Bede (novel by Eliot)

    Adam Bede, novel written by George Eliot, published in three volumes in 1859. The title character, a carpenter, is in love with an unmarried woman who bears a child by another man. Although Bede tries to help her, he eventually loses her but finds happiness with someone else. Adam Bede was Eliot’s

  • Adam Blair (work by Lockhart)

    John Gibson Lockhart: …clergyman’s surrender to sexual temptation, Adam Blair (1822).

  • Adam brothers (French sculptors)

    Adam brothers, three French brothers who sculpted many monuments for the French and Prussian royal residences. They were exponents of a style that employed the textures of shells, corals, and perforated rocks. Lambert-Sigisbert Adam (1700–59) created sculptures for King Louis XV of France and

  • Adam Dalgliesh (fictional character)

    P.D. James: …known for her fictional detective Adam Dalgliesh of Scotland Yard.

  • Adam de la Halle (French poet)

    Adam De La Halle, poet, musician, and innovator of the earliest French secular theatre. Adam’s Jeu de la feuillée (“Play of the Greensward”) is a satirical fantasy based on his own life, written to amuse his friends in Arras upon his departure for Paris to pursue his studies. Le Congé (“The Leave T

  • Adam Haberberg (novel by Reza)

    Yasmina Reza: …find happiness in life, and Adam Haberberg (2002), which centres on an unsuccessful, unhappy middle-aged writer whose happenstance encounter with an old friend from high school reminds him of how much his life and his family mean to him. Reza’s later novels include Dans la luge d’Arthur Schopenhauer (2005; “Arthur…

  • Adam Had Four Sons (film by Ratoff [1941])

    Gregory Ratoff: Films of the 1930s and ’40s: …film for the studio was Adam Had Four Sons (1941), starring Bergman as a French governess who oversees the defiant daughter (Susan Hayward) of a widower (Baxter). In 1941 he also directed The Men in Her Life, with Young as a ballerina who reminisces about her many past loves, and…

  • Adam Homo (work by Paludan-Müller)

    Frederik Paludan-Müller: His Adam Homo, 3 vol. (1842–49; Eng. trans. Adam Homo), a lengthy satirical epic in three parts, is counted among the most important works of Danish literature. Its autobiographical hero, Adam Homo, is a worldly success who suffers the loss of his soul. He is saved…

  • Adam in Exile (drama by Grotius)

    Hugo Grotius: Early life: …philological works and a drama, Adamus Exul (1601; Adam in Exile), which was greatly admired by the English poet John Milton. Grotius also published many theological and politico-theological works, including De Veritate Religionis Christianae (1627; The Truth of the Christian Religion), the book that in his lifetime probably enjoyed the…

  • Adam of Bremen (German historian)

    Adam Of Bremen, German historian whose work on the archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen provides valuable information on German politics under the Salian emperors and is also one of the great books of medieval geography. Of Franconian origin, he was probably educated at the cathedral school in Bamberg but

  • Adam Opel AG (German company)

    Opel AG, German automotive company, a wholly owned subsidiary of the U.S. General Motors Corporation, specializing in the manufacture of passenger cars, minibuses, and light vans. Headquarters are in Rüsselsheim, Ger. The company was started in 1898 when the five Opel brothers began converting t

  • Adam Qadmon (mythology)

    Isaac ben Solomon Luria: …returned to their source, and Adam Qadmon, the symbolic “primordial man,” who is the highest configuration of the divine light, is rebuilt. Man plays an important role in this process through various kawwanot used during prayer and through mystical intentions involving secret combinations of words, all of which is directed…

  • Adam the Hunchback (French poet)

    Adam De La Halle, poet, musician, and innovator of the earliest French secular theatre. Adam’s Jeu de la feuillée (“Play of the Greensward”) is a satirical fantasy based on his own life, written to amuse his friends in Arras upon his departure for Paris to pursue his studies. Le Congé (“The Leave T

  • Adam’s apple (anatomy)

    larynx: …elevation commonly known as the Adam’s apple. The plates tend to be replaced by bone cells beginning from about 20 years of age onward.

  • Adam’s Breed (work by Hall)

    Radclyffe Hall: Adam’s Breed (1926), a sensitive novel about the life of a restaurant keeper, won the coveted Prix Fémina and the 1927 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction.

  • Adam’s Bridge (shoals, India)

    Adam’s Bridge, chain of shoals, between the islands of Mannar, near northwestern Sri Lanka, and Rāmeswaram, off the southeastern coast of India. The bridge is 30 miles (48 km) long and separates the Gulf of Mannar (southwest) from the Palk Strait (northeast). Some of the sandbanks are dry, and

  • Adam’s needle (plant)

    yucca: gloriosa), and Adam’s needle (Y. filamentosa) are commonly cultivated as ornamentals for their unusual appearance and attractive flower clusters.

  • Adam’s Peak (mountain, Sri Lanka)

    Adam’s Peak, mountain in southwestern Sri Lanka (Ceylon), 7,360 feet (2,243 m) high and 11 miles (18 km) northeast of Ratnapura; it is located in the Sri Lanka hill country. Its conical summit terminates in an oblong platform about 74 by 24 feet (22 by 7 m), on which there is a large hollow

  • Adam’s Rib (film by Cukor [1949])

    Adam’s Rib, American romantic comedy film, directed by George Cukor and released in 1949, that was a vehicle for the powerhouse pairing of Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn in a classic battle of the sexes. The plot involves a husband and wife (played by Tracy and Hepburn) who are lawyers on

  • Adam, Adolphe (French composer)

    Adolphe Adam, French composer whose music for the ballet Giselle (1841) is noted for its easy grace and cogency. It has retained its popularity with dancers and audiences to the present day. Adam wrote more than 70operas, of which the most popular in their day were Le Châlet (1834), Le Postillon de

  • Adam, Adolphe-Charles (French composer)

    Adolphe Adam, French composer whose music for the ballet Giselle (1841) is noted for its easy grace and cogency. It has retained its popularity with dancers and audiences to the present day. Adam wrote more than 70operas, of which the most popular in their day were Le Châlet (1834), Le Postillon de

  • Adam, François-Gaspard-Balthasar (French sculptor)

    Adam brothers: François-Gaspard-Balthasar Adam (1710–61) was responsible for works at Frederick’s royal palace of Sanssouci near Potsdam and at Potsdam itself.

  • Adam, Henri-Georges (French artist)

    tapestry: …the contemporary engraver and sculptor Henri-Georges Adam, is a triptych (three panels). Until the 19th century, tapestries were often ordered in Europe by the “room” rather than by the single panel. A “room” order included not only wall hangings but also tapestry weavings to upholster furniture, cover cushions, and make…

  • Adam, Idris Mohammed (Eritrean leader)

    Eritrea: Beginning of armed revolt: …all Muslims, were led by Idris Mohammed Adam, a leading political figure in Eritrea in the 1940s. By the mid-1960s the ELF was able to field a small guerrilla force in the western plain of Eritrea, and thus it began a war that was to last nearly three decades. In…

  • Adam, James (Scottish architect)

    Robert Adam: The Adam style: …help of his younger brother James, who joined him in London in 1763, created and fully developed the Adam style. They later claimed that it “brought about, in this country…a kind of revolution in the whole system of this useful and elegant art.” The Adam style was marked by a…

  • Adam, Karl (German coach)

    rowing: Stroke and style of training: The German coach Karl Adam in the 1950s produced good results when he introduced new training methods based on Fahrtspiel (“speed play”), originally used for training runners, and on interval training (short sprints alternated with long runs).

  • Adam, Ken (German-British production designer)
  • Adam, Lambert-Sigisbert (French sculptor)

    Adam brothers: Lambert-Sigisbert Adam (1700–59) created sculptures for King Louis XV of France and Frederick the Great of Prussia. Nicolas-Sébastien Adam (1705–78) sculptured for Stanislas I Leszczyński, father-in-law of Louis and former king of Poland. François-Gaspard-Balthasar Adam (1710–61) was responsible for works at Frederick’s royal palace of…

  • Adam, Nicolas-Sébastien (French sculptor)

    Adam brothers: Nicolas-Sébastien Adam (1705–78) sculptured for Stanislas I Leszczyński, father-in-law of Louis and former king of Poland. François-Gaspard-Balthasar Adam (1710–61) was responsible for works at Frederick’s royal palace of Sanssouci near Potsdam and at Potsdam itself.

  • Adam, Paul (French author)

    Paul Adam, French author whose early works exemplify the naturalist and Symbolist schools and who later won a considerable reputation for his historical and sociological novels. Publication of his first naturalist novel, Chair molle (1885), led to his being prosecuted; his second, Le Thé chez

  • Adam, Robert (Scottish architect)

    Robert Adam, Scottish architect and designer who, with his brother James (1730–94), transformed Palladian Neoclassicism in England into the airy, light, elegant style that bears their name. His major architectural works include public buildings (especially in London), and his designs were used for

  • Adam, Roi (French poet and musician)

    Adenet Le Roi, poet and musician, interesting for the detailed documentary evidence of his career as a household minstrel. He received his training in the court of Henry III, duke of Brabant, at Leuven; after his patron’s death in 1261, his fortunes wavered, owing to dynastic rivalries and the

  • Adam, William (Scottish architect)

    Robert Adam: Early life: …was the second son of William Adam, the foremost Scottish architect of his time. William, who as master mason to the Board of Ordnance in North Britain supervised the design of military buildings, also designed numerous country houses in a conservative Palladian style—the modified classic Roman style that was originally…

  • Adam: A Play (French literature)

    French literature: Religious drama: …is the Jeu d’Adam (Adam: A Play). It is known from a copy in an Anglo-Norman manuscript, and it may have originated in England in the mid-12th century. With lively dialogue and the varied metres characteristic of the later mystères (all of which were based on biblical stories), it…

  • Adama, Modibbo (Fulani warrior)

    Adamawa: The emirate was founded by Modibbo Adama, who, under the authority of Sheikh Usman dan Fodio, began a Fulani jihad (holy war) in the region in 1809. Adama moved the capital of his kingdom, which was then known as Fumbina, several times before settling it finally in 1841 in Yola,…

  • adamantine lustre (mineralogy)

    mineral: Lustre: asbestos [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]); and adamantine, having the brilliant lustre of diamond, exhibited by minerals with a high refractive index comparable to diamond and which as such refract light as strongly as the latter (examples are cerussite [PbCO3] and anglesite [PbSO4]).

  • Adamaoua Plateau (plateau, west-central Africa)

    Adamawa Plateau, volcanic upland in west-central Africa. Though the plateau is chiefly in north-central Cameroon, the part of it known as the Gotel Mountains is in southeastern Nigeria. The plateau is the source of the Benue River. Its highest elevations are more than 8,700 feet (2,650 metres)

  • Adamas (Gnosticism)

    gnosticism: Adversus haereses: …is a perfect human named Adamas—a divine prototype of the earthly Adam of Genesis. Adamas is united with a consort, Perfect Knowledge (gnosis). The teaching thus provides a mythic account of how plurality (of divine attributes) originated from unity and how true humanity is also divine. The last divine entity…

  • Adamawa (state, Nigeria)

    Adamawa, state, northeastern Nigeria. It was administratively created in 1991 from the northeastern half of former Gongola state. Adamawa is bordered on the north and northwest by Borno and Gombe states, on the west and southwest by Taraba state, and on the southeast and east by Cameroon. The

  • Adamawa (traditional emirate, Africa)

    Adamawa, traditional emirate centred in what is now Adamawa state, eastern Nigeria. The emirate was founded by Modibbo Adama, who, under the authority of Sheikh Usman dan Fodio, began a Fulani jihad (holy war) in the region in 1809. Adama moved the capital of his kingdom, which was then known as

  • Adamawa languages (African language)

    Adamawa-Ubangi languages: …languages are further subdivided into Adamawa and Ubangi subgroups.

  • Adamawa Plateau (plateau, west-central Africa)

    Adamawa Plateau, volcanic upland in west-central Africa. Though the plateau is chiefly in north-central Cameroon, the part of it known as the Gotel Mountains is in southeastern Nigeria. The plateau is the source of the Benue River. Its highest elevations are more than 8,700 feet (2,650 metres)

  • Adamawa-Eastern languages (African language)

    Adamawa-Ubangi languages, branch of the Niger-Congo language family consisting of 120 languages spoken by approximately 12 million people in an area that stretches from northeastern Nigeria across northern Cameroon, southern Chad, the Central African Republic, and northern Democratic Republic of

  • Adamawa-Ubangi languages (African language)

    Adamawa-Ubangi languages, branch of the Niger-Congo language family consisting of 120 languages spoken by approximately 12 million people in an area that stretches from northeastern Nigeria across northern Cameroon, southern Chad, the Central African Republic, and northern Democratic Republic of

  • Adamec, Ladislav (Czech politician)

    Ladislav Adamec, Czech politician (born Sept. 10, 1926, Frenstat pod Radhostem, Moravia, Czech. [now in Czech Republic]—died April 14, 2007 , Prague, Czech Rep.), failed to prevent the end of communist rule in his country even as he tried to initiate modest reforms as federal prime minister

  • adamellite (mineral)

    Quartz monzonite, intrusive igneous rock (solidified from a liquid state) that contains plagioclase feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, and quartz. It is abundant in the large batholiths (great masses of igneous rocks mostly deep below the surface) of the world’s mountain belts. Quartz monzonite differs

  • Adamic, Louis (American author)

    Louis Adamic, novelist and journalist who wrote about the experience of American minorities, especially immigrants, in the early 1900s. Adamic immigrated to the United States from Yugoslavia at age 14 and was naturalized in 1918. He wrote about what he called the failure of the American melting pot

  • Adamkavecius, Valdas V. (president of Lithuania)

    Valdas Adamkus, president of Lithuania (1998–2003 and 2004–09). During World War II Adamkus fought with Lithuanian insurrectionists against Soviet rule, published an underground newspaper during the Nazi occupation, and then resumed the fight against the returning Soviet army. In 1944 he fled to

  • Adamkus, Valdas (president of Lithuania)

    Valdas Adamkus, president of Lithuania (1998–2003 and 2004–09). During World War II Adamkus fought with Lithuanian insurrectionists against Soviet rule, published an underground newspaper during the Nazi occupation, and then resumed the fight against the returning Soviet army. In 1944 he fled to

  • Adamnan, Law of (reforms)

    Saint Adamnan: …reforms became known as the Law of Adamnan.

  • Adamnan, Saint (Irish abbot and scholar)

    Saint Adamnan, ; feast day September 23), abbot and scholar, particularly noted as the biographer of St. Columba. Nothing is known of Adamnan’s early life. In 679 he was elected abbot of Iona, the ninth in succession from St. Columba, the founder. While on a visit to Northumbria, he adopted the

  • Adamnán, The Vision of (Gaelic literature)

    The Vision of Adamnán, in the Gaelic literature of Ireland, one of the earliest and most outstanding medieval Irish visions. This graceful prose work dates from the 10th century and is preserved in the later The Book of the Dun Cow (c. 1100). Patterned after pagan voyages (immrama) to the

  • Adamo (work by Andreini)

    Giovambattista Andreini: …the author of the play Adamo (“Adam”), which, it has been claimed, suggested the idea of Paradise Lost to John Milton.

  • Adamov, Arthur (French author)

    Arthur Adamov, avant-garde writer, a founder and major playwright of the Theatre of the Absurd. In 1912 Adamov’s wealthy Armenian family left Russia and settled in Freudenstadt, Ger. He was subsequently educated in Geneva, Mainz, and Paris, where, having mastered French, he settled in 1924,

  • Adams (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Adams, county, southern Pennsylvania, U.S., mostly consisting of a piedmont region bordered by Maryland to the south and the Blue Ridge Mountains to the west and north. The principal waterways are Lakes Meade and Heritage and Long Pine Run Reservoir, as well as Conewago, Toms, and Rock creeks.

  • Adams (astronomy)

    Neptune: The ring system: …in the outermost ring, named Adams, where the density of ring particles is particularly high. Although rings also encircle each of the other three giant planets, none displays the striking clumpiness of Adams. The arcs are found within a 45° segment of the ring. From leading to trailing, the most…

  • Adams (novel by Clair)

    René Clair: …he also published a novel, Adams (1926), written in a cerebral and elliptical style.

  • Adams (Massachusetts, United States)

    Adams, town (township), Berkshire county, northwestern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies at the foot of Mount Greylock (3,491 feet [1,064 metres]), on the Hoosic River, 15 miles (24 km) north of Pittsfield. The town of North Adams is 5 miles north. Founded by Quakers in 1766, it was known as East Hoosuck

  • Adams family (American political and intellectual family)

    Adams family, Massachusetts family with deep roots in American history whose members made major contributions to the nation’s political and intellectual life for more than 150 years. Established in America by Henry Adams, who emigrated from England to Massachusetts Bay Colony about 1636, the family

  • Adams Memorial (memorial, Washington, D.C.)

    Washington, D.C.: Monuments and memorials: …the most striking being the Adams Memorial (1886–91), with a shrouded bronze figure designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens and commissioned by historian Henry Adams (the great-grandson of John Adams), in memory of his wife, Marian. Saint-Gaudens called the sculpture The Mystery of the Hereafter, but it is often mistakenly called “Grief.”…

  • Adams State College (college, Alamosa, Colorado, United States)

    Alamosa: It is the seat of Adams State College (1921) and is the gateway to the Great Sand Dunes National Monument. Fort Garland is now a history museum. The Alamosa–Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge Complex, providing a habitat for migratory waterfowl, lies nearby, as does part of Rio Grande National Forest.…

  • Adams, Abigail (American first lady)

    Abigail Adams, American first lady (1797–1801), the wife of John Adams, second president of the United States, and mother of John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States. She was a prolific letter writer whose correspondence gives an intimate and vivid portrayal of life in the young

  • Adams, Amy (American actress)

    Amy Adams, American actress, especially noted for her critically acclaimed portrayals of naive and charming characters. Adams was born in Italy while her father served in the U.S. military, and she grew up in Castle Rock, Colorado, as one of seven children. In the mid-1990s she began acting and

  • Adams, Amy Lou (American actress)

    Amy Adams, American actress, especially noted for her critically acclaimed portrayals of naive and charming characters. Adams was born in Italy while her father served in the U.S. military, and she grew up in Castle Rock, Colorado, as one of seven children. In the mid-1990s she began acting and

  • Adams, Ansel (American photographer)

    Ansel Adams, American photographer who was the most important landscape photographer of the 20th century. He is also perhaps the most widely known and beloved photographer in the history of the United States; the popularity of his work has only increased since his death. Adams’s most important work

  • Adams, Basil Albert (British chemist)

    ion-exchange reaction: Ion-exchange materials: …discovered by the English chemists Basil Albert Adams and Eric Leighton Holmes. The resins were chemical relatives of the plastic Bakelite and were made by condensing polyhydric phenols or phenolsulfonic acids with formaldehyde.

  • Adams, Brooks (American historian)

    Brooks Adams, historian who questioned the success of democracy in the U.S. and who related the march of civilization to the westward movement of trade centres. Adams graduated from Harvard in 1870 and practiced law in Boston until 1881. Son of the diplomat Charles Francis Adams and grandson of

  • Adams, Bryan (Canadian musician and photographer)

    Bryan Adams, Canadian rock singer-songwriter, photographer, and social activist whose hit albums Cuts Like a Knife (1983) and Reckless (1984) made him one of the most popular and successful recording artists of the 1980s. Adams was musically talented at an early age and taught himself how to play

  • Adams, Bryan Guy (Canadian musician and photographer)

    Bryan Adams, Canadian rock singer-songwriter, photographer, and social activist whose hit albums Cuts Like a Knife (1983) and Reckless (1984) made him one of the most popular and successful recording artists of the 1980s. Adams was musically talented at an early age and taught himself how to play

  • Adams, Charles Follen (American poet)

    Charles Follen Adams, U.S. regional humorous poet, best known for his Pennsylvania German dialect poems. During the American Civil War he was wounded and taken prisoner. In 1872 he began writing humorous verses for periodicals and newspapers in a Pennsylvania German dialect. Collections of his

  • Adams, Charles Francis (American diplomat)

    Charles Francis Adams, U.S. diplomat who played an important role in keeping Britain neutral during the U.S. Civil War (1861–65) and in promoting the arbitration of the important “Alabama” claims. The son of Pres. John Quincy Adams and the grandson of Pres. John Adams, Charles was early introduced

  • Adams, Charles Francis, III (United States official)

    Charles Francis Adams III, American lawyer and businessman, government official, yachtsman, and philanthropist who made Harvard University one of the most abundantly endowed academic institutions. Adams was the son of the lawyer and historian Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835–1915), as well as

  • Adams, Charles Francis, Jr. (American executive)

    Adams family: Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835–1915), was a historian, civic leader, and railroad expert who for a time was president of the Union Pacific Railroad and who later retired to write a biography of his father and books on other historical subjects. His two brothers, Henry…

  • Adams, Charles Kendall (American teacher and historian)

    Charles Kendall Adams, teacher and historian who introduced the European seminar method to U.S. universities. Graduating from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1861, Adams taught history there until 1885. His study in Germany and France in 1867–68 led to his introduction of the seminar

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