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  • Athenaeus (Greek grammarian and author)

    Athenaeus, Greek grammarian and author of Deipnosophistai (“The Gastronomers”), a work in the form of an aristocratic symposium, in which a number of learned men, some bearing the names of real persons, such as Galen, meet at a banquet and discuss food and other subjects. In its extant form the

  • Athenagoras (Greek Christian philosopher and apologist)

    Athenagoras, Greek Christian philosopher and apologist whose Presbeia peri Christianōn (c. 177; Embassy for the Christians) is one of the earliest works to use Neoplatonic concepts to interpret Christian belief and worship for Greek and Roman cultures and to refute early pagan charges that

  • Athenagoras I (Greek patriarch)

    Athenagoras I, ecumenical patriarch and archbishop of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) from 1948 to 1972. Athenagoras was the son of a physician. He attended the seminary on the island of Halki, near Constantinople, and was ordained a deacon in 1910. He then moved to Athens, where he served as a

  • Athēnai (national capital, Greece)

    Athens, historic city and capital of Greece. Many of Classical civilization’s intellectual and artistic ideas originated there, and the city is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western civilization. Athens lies 5 miles (8 km) from the Bay of Phaleron, an inlet of the Aegean (Aigaíon)

  • Athenais (Byzantine empress)

    Eudocia, wife of the Eastern Roman emperor Theodosius II. She was a highly cultured woman who, in rivalry with her sister-in-law, the empress Pulcheria, exercised great influence over her husband until her withdrawal from Constantinople. Athenais, as she was then called, came from Athens, where her

  • Athenäum (German Catholic periodical)

    Jakob Frohschammer: …1862, the year he founded Athenäum, a periodical of liberal Catholicism for which he wrote the first adequate account in German of Darwin’s theory on the origin of species by means of natural selection. Excommunicated in 1871, he replied with Der Fels Petri in Rom (1873; “The Rock of Peter…

  • Athenäum (German literary periodical)

    August Wilhelm von Schlegel: >Athenäum (1798–1800), which became the organ of German Romanticism, numbering Friedrich Schleiermacher and Novalis among its contributors.

  • Athene (Greek mythology)

    Athena, in Greek religion, the city protectress, goddess of war, handicraft, and practical reason, identified by the Romans with Minerva. She was essentially urban and civilized, the antithesis in many respects of Artemis, goddess of the outdoors. Athena was probably a pre-Hellenic goddess and was

  • Athene cunicularia (bird)

    Burrowing owl, (Speotyto cunicularia), small owl of the family Strigidae (order Strigiformes) that inhabits prairie lands of the Western Hemisphere from southwestern Canada to Tierra del Fuego. Burrowing owls live in holes abandoned by other animals. They eat mainly insects and small rodents. They

  • Athene noctua (bird)

    Little owl, (Athene noctua), brownish bird about 20 centimetres (about 8 inches) long, belonging to the family Strigidae (order Strigiformes). Little owls occur in Europe, central Asia, and northern Africa and have been introduced into New Zealand. They are active during the day and often perch in

  • Atheneum (building, New Harmony, Indiana, United States)

    Richard Meier: …large public commissions, including the Atheneum (1975–79) in New Harmony, Indiana; the Museum of Decorative Arts (1979–85) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany; the High Museum of Art (1980–83) in Atlanta, Georgia; the City Hall and Library (1986–95) in The Hague, Netherlands; and the Museum of Contemporary Art (1987–95) in Barcelona,…

  • Athenian calendar (ancient Greek chronology)

    Greek calendar: …has been most studied, the Athenian, customarily began its year with the first new moon after the summer solstice.

  • Athenian empire (historical empire, Europe)

    ancient Greek civilization: The Athenian empire: The eastern Greeks of the islands and mainland felt themselves particularly vulnerable and appealed to the natural leader, Sparta. The Spartans’ proposed solution was an unacceptable plan to evacuate Ionia and resettle its Greek inhabitants elsewhere; this would have been a remarkable usurpation…

  • Athenian Mercury (English periodical)

    history of publishing: Beginnings in the 17th century: … (better known later as the Athenian Mercury; 1690–97), run by a London publisher, John Dunton, to resolve “all the most Nice and Curious Questions.” Soon after came the Gentleman’s Journal (1692–94), started by the French-born Peter Anthony Motteux, with a monthly blend of news, prose, and poetry. In 1693, after…

  • Athenodorus (king of Palmyra)

    ancient Rome: Difficulties in the East: …titles granted to their son Vaballathus. Then in 270, taking advantage of the deaths of Gallienus and Claudius II, she invaded Egypt and a part of Anatolia. This invasion was followed by a rupture with Rome, and in 271 Vaballathus was proclaimed Imperator Caesar Augustus. The latent separatism of the…

  • Athenodorus Cananites (Greek philosopher)

    Athenodorus Cananites, Greek Stoic philosopher who was the teacher of the younger Octavian, who later became the emperor Augustus. He is to be distinguished from Athenodorus Cordylion, also a Stoic, who became keeper of the library in Pergamum. Athenodorus acquired a lasting influence over

  • Athenodorus Son of Sandon (Greek philosopher)

    Athenodorus Cananites, Greek Stoic philosopher who was the teacher of the younger Octavian, who later became the emperor Augustus. He is to be distinguished from Athenodorus Cordylion, also a Stoic, who became keeper of the library in Pergamum. Athenodorus acquired a lasting influence over

  • Athenry (Ireland)

    Athenry, market town, County Galway, Ireland. It was founded in the 13th century during the Anglo-Norman colonization. Much of the medieval town wall (1211) survives, together with the keep of the castle (1235) and part of the Dominican priory (founded 1241), which was specifically exempted from

  • Athens (Tennessee, United States)

    Athens, city, seat of McMinn county, southeastern Tennessee, U.S. It lies in the Tennessee River valley, between the Great Smoky Mountains (east) and the Cumberland Plateau (west), about 55 miles (90 km) southwest of Knoxville. It was founded in 1821 as a seat of justice, and the courts were moved

  • Athens (Ohio, United States)

    Athens, city, seat (1805) of Athens county, southeastern Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Hocking River, about 75 miles (120 km) southeast of Columbus. It was founded in 1800 by the territorial legislature as the seat of the American Western University, which was renamed Ohio University in 1804. Athens

  • Athens (Georgia, United States)

    Athens, city, seat (1871) of Clarke county (with which it was consolidated in 1990), northeastern Georgia, U.S., situated on the Oconee River. Founded in 1801 as the seat of the University of Georgia (chartered 1785), it was probably named for Athens, Greece. The city grew with the university, was

  • Athens (Alabama, United States)

    Athens, city, seat (1819) of Limestone county, northern Alabama, U.S., in the Tennessee River valley, about 25 miles (40 km) west of Huntsville. Settled in 1807 and named for Athens, Greece, it grew as an agricultural and timber centre. During the American Civil War, the town was occupied at

  • Athens (national capital, Greece)

    Athens, historic city and capital of Greece. Many of Classical civilization’s intellectual and artistic ideas originated there, and the city is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western civilization. Athens lies 5 miles (8 km) from the Bay of Phaleron, an inlet of the Aegean (Aigaíon)

  • Athens (Wisconsin, United States)

    Oshkosh, city, seat (1848) of Winnebago county, east-central Wisconsin, U.S. It lies on the western shore of Lake Winnebago where the Fox River enters, some 80 miles (130 km) northwest of Milwaukee. Potawatomi, Menominee, Ho-Chunk Nation (Winnebago), Fox, and Ojibwa Indians were early inhabitants

  • Athens 1896 Olympic Games

    Athens 1896 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Athens that took place April 6–15, 1896. The Athens Games were the first occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. The inaugural Games of the modern Olympics were attended by as many as 280 athletes, all male, from 12 countries. The athletes

  • Athens 2004 Olympic Games

    Athens 2004 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Athens that took place August 13–29, 2004. The Athens Games were the 25th occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. The 2004 Olympic Games returned home to Greece, birthplace of the ancient Games and site of the inaugural modern Olympics. The

  • Athens of South America (national capital, Colombia)

    Bogotá, capital of Colombia. It lies in central Colombia in a fertile upland basin 8,660 feet (2,640 metres) above sea level in the Cordillera Oriental of the Northern Andes Mountains. Bogotá occupies a sloping plain at the base of two mountains, Guadalupe and Monserrate, upon whose crests stand

  • Athens, Academy of (academy, Athens, Greece)

    Greece: Cultural institutions: …prestigious learned society is the Academy of Athens.

  • Athens, National Capodistrian University of (university, Athens, Greece)

    Greece: The Great Idea: The University of Athens (1837) attracted people from all parts of the Greek world to be trained as students and apostles of Hellenism.

  • Athens, University of (university, Athens, Greece)

    Greece: The Great Idea: The University of Athens (1837) attracted people from all parts of the Greek world to be trained as students and apostles of Hellenism.

  • Atherinidae (fish)

    Silversides, any of several species of small slim schooling fish of the family Atherinidae (order Atheriniformes), found in freshwater and along coasts around the world in warm and temperate regions. Silversides are named for the wide silvery stripe usually present on each side. They have two

  • atheriniform (fish)

    Atheriniform, any member of the order Atheriniformes, containing 15 families of marine and freshwater spiny-finned fishes, including the flying fishes (see photograph), needlefishes, silversides, and cyprinodonts. The last group, the Cyprinodontidae, is an abundant tropical and subtropical family

  • Atheriniformes (fish)

    Atheriniform, any member of the order Atheriniformes, containing 15 families of marine and freshwater spiny-finned fishes, including the flying fishes (see photograph), needlefishes, silversides, and cyprinodonts. The last group, the Cyprinodontidae, is an abundant tropical and subtropical family

  • Atherinomorpha (fish series)

    fish: Annotated classification: Series Atherinomorpha Testes are a restricted spermatogonial type; egg demersal, with chorionic filaments; fin spines present or absent but frequently weak when present; vertebral number higher than 24; ctenoid scales rare; pelvic fins abdominal, subabdominal, or thoracic in position; pelvic fins may be connected to pleural…

  • Atheris matildae (snake)

    viper: …vipers (genus Atheris), such as Matilda’s horned viper (A. matildae) of Tanzania, are slender, prehensile-tailed, and arboreal. Some species lay eggs; others produce live young.

  • athermal solution (chemistry)

    liquid: Athermal solutions: In a solution in which the molecules of one component are much larger than those of the other, the assumption that the solution is regular (i.e., that SE = 0) no longer provides a reasonable approximation even if the effect of intermolecular forces…

  • atheroma (pathology)

    arteriosclerosis: …connective tissue is called an atheroma, or fatty plaque. The bigger the plaque, the more it affects the size of the arterial lumen, the area through which the blood flows. If the wall of the vessel is overly thickened from a large atheroma or multiple atheromas, there will be decreased…

  • atheromatous lesion (pathology)

    cardiovascular disease: Myocardial infarction: …though thrombotic occlusion of an atheromatous lesion in a coronary artery is the most common cause of the disorder, the manifestations are the result of the death of an area of heart muscle (infarction). The term myocardial infarction, therefore, is more appropriate. The less specific term heart attack may be…

  • atherosclerosis (pathology)

    Atherosclerosis, chronic disease caused by the deposition of fats, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances in the innermost layer of endothelium of the large and medium-sized arteries. Atherosclerosis is the most common arterial abnormality characterized as arteriosclerosis, which is defined by

  • atherosclerotic plaque (pathology)

    atherosclerosis: …thicken to form atheromas, or atherosclerotic plaques. These plaques may narrow the vessel channel, interfering with the flow of blood. Endothelial injury, either as a result of lipid deposition or as a result of another cause, may also be accompanied by the formation of fibrous caps of scar tissue. These…

  • Atherospermataceae (plant family)

    Laurales: Other families: Atherospermataceae species also have opposite, serrate leaves. There are as many stamens as perianth parts. The hypanthium becomes woody and splits when mature. The dry fruits (achenes) have a tuft of hair.

  • Atherton (England, United Kingdom)

    Atherton, town and urban area (from 2011 built-up area) in the metropolitan borough of Wigan, metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, northwest-central England. The manor was held by the Atherton family from the early 13th century to 1738. Atherton was an early

  • Atherton Plateau (highland region, Australia)

    Atherton Tableland, highland region that is part of the Great Dividing Range (Eastern Highlands) in northeastern Queensland, Australia. The plateau region is bounded by the Palmer (north) and Burdekin (south) rivers and has an area of 12,000 square miles (31,000 square km). Its average elevation of

  • Atherton Tableland (highland region, Australia)

    Atherton Tableland, highland region that is part of the Great Dividing Range (Eastern Highlands) in northeastern Queensland, Australia. The plateau region is bounded by the Palmer (north) and Burdekin (south) rivers and has an area of 12,000 square miles (31,000 square km). Its average elevation of

  • Atherton, Gertrude (American author)

    Gertrude Atherton, American novelist, noted as an author of fictional biography and history. Atherton’s biography of Nikolay Petrovich Rezanov appeared in the 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (see the Britannica Classic: Nicolai Petrovich de Rezánov). Gertrude Horn grew up in a

  • Atherton, Gertrude Franklin (American author)

    Gertrude Atherton, American novelist, noted as an author of fictional biography and history. Atherton’s biography of Nikolay Petrovich Rezanov appeared in the 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (see the Britannica Classic: Nicolai Petrovich de Rezánov). Gertrude Horn grew up in a

  • Atherurus (rodent)

    porcupine: Old World porcupines (family Hystricidae): Brush-tailed porcupines (genus Atherurus) move swiftly over the ground and can climb, jump, and swim. They sometimes congregate to rest and feed. Brush- and long-tailed species shelter in tree roots, hollow trunks, rocky crevices, termite mounds, caves, abandoned burrows, or eroded cavities along stream banks.…

  • Athesis (river, Italy)

    Adige River, longest stream of Italy after the Po River. The Adige rises in the north from two Alpine mountain lakes below Resia Pass and flows rapidly through the Venosta Valley south and east past Merano and Bolzano. Having received the waters of the Isarco River at Bolzano, the Adige turns south

  • athetoid cerebral palsy (pathology)

    cerebral palsy: In the athetoid type of cerebral palsy, paralysis of voluntary movements may not occur, and spastic contractions may be slight or absent. Instead, there are slow, involuntary spasms of the face, neck, and extremities, either on one side (hemiathetosis) or, more frequently, on both sides (double athetosis),…

  • athetosis (pathology)

    Athetosis, slow, purposeless, and involuntary movements of the hands, feet, face, tongue, and neck (as well as other muscle groups). The fingers are separately flexed and extended in an entirely irregular way. The hands as a whole are also moved, and the arms, toes, and feet may be affected. The

  • Athey, Susan (American economist)

    Susan Athey, American economist who, in 2007, became the first woman to win the John Bates Clark (JBC) medal, the American Economic Association award granted biennially to the best economist under age 40 working in the United States. The citation noted Athey’s contribution to economic theory,

  • Athínai (national capital, Greece)

    Athens, historic city and capital of Greece. Many of Classical civilization’s intellectual and artistic ideas originated there, and the city is generally considered to be the birthplace of Western civilization. Athens lies 5 miles (8 km) from the Bay of Phaleron, an inlet of the Aegean (Aigaíon)

  • Athīr, Ḍiyāʾ al-Dīn ibn al- (Arab scholar)

    Arabic literature: Compilations and manuals: …a later work of compilation, Ḍiyāʾ al-Dīn ibn al-Athīr’s Al-Mathal al-sāʾir fī adab al-kātib wa al-shāʿir (“The Current Model for the Literary Discipline of the Scribe and Poet”), where the sequence of functions found in the title very much reflects the author’s own career as an accomplished writer of belles…

  • Athis-Mons (France)

    Athis-Mons, town, southern suburb of Paris, in Essonne département, Île-de-France région, northern France. Athis-Mons lies near the confluence of the Orge and Seine rivers and is bisected by the N7 road artery leading to the centre of Paris. It was ancient Attegais, later Athis-sur-Orge, where a

  • Athis-sur-Orge (France)

    Athis-Mons, town, southern suburb of Paris, in Essonne département, Île-de-France région, northern France. Athis-Mons lies near the confluence of the Orge and Seine rivers and is bisected by the N7 road artery leading to the centre of Paris. It was ancient Attegais, later Athis-sur-Orge, where a

  • Athis-sur-Orge, Treaty of (French history)

    Guy: …independence of Flanders in the Treaty of Athis-sur-Orge (1305).

  • Athlab, Mount (mountains, Arabia)

    Thamūd: …settling on the slopes of Mount Athlab. Recent archaeological work has revealed numerous Thamūdic rock writings and pictures not only on Mount Athlab but also throughout central Arabia.

  • athlete’s foot (pathology)

    Athlete’s foot, fungal infection of the feet, a form of ringworm. The skin areas most commonly affected are the plantar surface (sole) of the foot and the web spaces between the toes. It is estimated that at least 70 percent of all people will have a fungal foot infection at some point in their

  • Athletic Association of Western Universities (American organization)

    Pacific-12 Conference: …UCLA, and Washington formed the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU). After Washington State joined the new conference in 1962 and Oregon and Oregon State in 1964, the name was changed to the Pacific-8 Conference. The University of Arizona and Arizona State University were admitted in 1978, completing the renamed…

  • athletic games and contests (recreation)

    sports: The socialization process: contests, and sports have crucial and quite specific roles in the general socialization process. The sense of self is not natural; it develops through childhood socialization as a result of role-playing. Influenced by George Herbert Mead and Jean Piaget among others, sociologists have identified two…

  • athletic type (physique classification)

    Ernst Kretschmer: …asthenic type, the more muscular athletic type, and the rotund pyknic type. He suggested that the lanky asthenics, and to a lesser degree the athletic types, were more prone to schizophrenia, while the pyknic types were more likely to develop manic-depressive disorders. His work was criticized because his thinner, schizophrenic…

  • Athletics (American baseball team)

    Oakland Athletics, American professional baseball team based in Oakland, California, that plays in the American League (AL). The Athletics—who are often simply referred to as the “A’s”—have won nine World Series championships and 15 AL pennants. Founded in 1901 and based in Philadelphia, the A’s

  • athletics

    Athletics, a variety of competitions in running, walking, jumping, and throwing events. Although these contests are called track and field (or simply track) in the United States, they are generally designated as athletics elsewhere. This article covers the history, the organization, and the

  • Athletics (work by Lowe)

    Doug Lowe: …(later Lord Porritt), he wrote Athletics (1929), which had training hints and described attitudes toward running in their day. Lowe was a tactical runner, more interested in winning than in fast time, and he used a finishing kick to advantage. Lowe was called to the bar in 1928, made queen’s…

  • Athlone (town and district, Ireland)

    Athlone, town, County Westmeath, Ireland. It lies on the River Shannon just south of Lough (lake) Ree. Located at a major east-west crossing of the Shannon, it has always been an important garrison town. In the 12th century the area, previously fortified by the kings of Uí Maine and Connaught

  • Athlone, Godard van Reede, 1st earl of (Dutch soldier)

    Godard van Reede, 1st earl of Athlone, Dutch soldier in English service who completed the conquest of Ireland for King William III of England (William of Orange, stadtholder of the United Provinces) against the forces of the deposed king James II after the Glorious Revolution (1688–89). Van Reede’s

  • Athlone, Godard van Reede, 1st earl of, baron of Aughrim, heer van Ginkel (Dutch soldier)

    Godard van Reede, 1st earl of Athlone, Dutch soldier in English service who completed the conquest of Ireland for King William III of England (William of Orange, stadtholder of the United Provinces) against the forces of the deposed king James II after the Glorious Revolution (1688–89). Van Reede’s

  • Athol (Massachusetts, United States)

    Athol, town (township), Worcester county, north-central Massachusetts, U.S. It lies on the Millers River, north of Quabbin Reservoir. Settled in 1735, it was known by the Algonquian name of Pequoiag until it was incorporated in 1762 and renamed for Blair Atholl, the Scottish home of the dukes of

  • Atholl (mountain region, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Atholl, mountainous traditional region covering approximately 450 square miles (1,165 square km) in northern Perth and Kinross council area, historic county of Perthshire, Scotland. Enclosed by several ranges of the Grampians, which exceed 3,000 feet (900 metres) in elevation, the Atholl basin,

  • Atholl, John Murray, 2nd Earl and 1st Marquess of (Scottish Royalist)

    John Murray, 2nd earl and 1st marquess of Atholl, a leading Scottish Royalist and defender of the Stuarts from the time of the English Civil Wars (1642–51) until after the accession of William and Mary (1689). The son of the 1st earl of Atholl in the Murray line, Atholl was the chief supporter of

  • Atholl, John Murray, 2nd Earl and 1st Marquess of, Earl of Tullibardin, Viscount of Balquhidder, Lord Murray, Balvany, and Gask (Scottish Royalist)

    John Murray, 2nd earl and 1st marquess of Atholl, a leading Scottish Royalist and defender of the Stuarts from the time of the English Civil Wars (1642–51) until after the accession of William and Mary (1689). The son of the 1st earl of Atholl in the Murray line, Atholl was the chief supporter of

  • Atholl, John Murray, 2nd Marquess and 1st Duke of (Scottish noble)

    John Murray, 2nd marquess and 1st duke of Atholl, a leading Scottish supporter of William and Mary and of the Hanoverian succession. Son of the 1st marquess of Atholl, he favoured the accession of William and Mary in 1689 but was unable, during his father’s absence, to prevent the majority of his

  • Atholl, John Murray, 2nd Marquess and 1st Duke of, Marquess of Tullibardin, Earl of Strathtay and Strathardle, Viscount of Balwhidder, Glenalmond, and Glenlyon, Lord Murray, Balvenie, and Gask (Scottish noble)

    John Murray, 2nd marquess and 1st duke of Atholl, a leading Scottish supporter of William and Mary and of the Hanoverian succession. Son of the 1st marquess of Atholl, he favoured the accession of William and Mary in 1689 but was unable, during his father’s absence, to prevent the majority of his

  • Atholl, John Stewart, 4th Earl of (Scottish noble)

    John Stewart, 4th earl of Atholl, Roman Catholic Scottish noble, sometime supporter of Mary, Queen of Scots. The son of John Stewart, the 3rd Earl of Atholl in the Stewart line (whom he succeeded in 1542), Atholl was particularly trusted by Mary Stuart; but, after the murder of Mary’s husband Lord

  • Athoracophoridae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …from the South Pacific (Athoracophoridae). Superfamily Arionacea A group possessing marginal teeth of radula with squarish basal plates and 1 to several cusps; small litter or tree snails mainly in Southern Hemisphere (Endodontidae); slugs (Arionidae and Philomycidae) in the Northern Hemisphere.

  • Athos (fictional character)

    Athos, fictional character, one of the swashbuckling heroes of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas père. The other two musketeers are his friends Porthos and Aramis, who join him in fighting various enemies during the reigns of the French kings Louis XIII and Louis

  • Áthos Óros (mountain, Greece)

    Mount Athos, mountain in northern Greece, site of a semiautonomous republic of Greek Orthodox monks inhabiting 20 monasteries and dependencies (skítes), some of which are larger than the parent monasteries. It occupies the easternmost of the three promontories of the Chalcidice (Khalkidhikí)

  • Athos, Mount (mountain, Greece)

    Mount Athos, mountain in northern Greece, site of a semiautonomous republic of Greek Orthodox monks inhabiting 20 monasteries and dependencies (skítes), some of which are larger than the parent monasteries. It occupies the easternmost of the three promontories of the Chalcidice (Khalkidhikí)

  • Athrotaxis (plant)

    Tasmanian cedar, any of three species of evergreen conifers of the genus Athrotaxis, of the cypress family (Cupressaceae), native to the temperate rain forests of Tasmania. Two of the species are small trees, 6 to 12 metres (20 to 40 feet) tall and 1 to 1.5 metres (3 to 5 feet) in circumference,

  • Athrotaxis selaginoides (plant)

    Tasmanian cedar: The third species, King William pine (A. selaginoides), is a timber tree that may grow as high as 30 metres (100 feet) and as large in circumference as 2.7 metres (9 feet). Its dark green, leathery leaves contain volatile oils.

  • ʿAthtar (Arabian deity)

    Arabian religion: South Arabia: …of the South Arabian pantheon, ʿAthtar had superseded the ancient supreme Semitic god Il or El, whose name survives nearly exclusively in theophoric names. ʿAthtar was a god of the thunderstorm, dispensing natural irrigation in the form of rain. When qualified as Sharīqān, “the Eastern One” (possibly a reference to…

  • ʿAthtar Shariqan (Arabian deity)

    Arabian religion: South Arabia: …of the South Arabian pantheon, ʿAthtar had superseded the ancient supreme Semitic god Il or El, whose name survives nearly exclusively in theophoric names. ʿAthtar was a god of the thunderstorm, dispensing natural irrigation in the form of rain. When qualified as Sharīqān, “the Eastern One” (possibly a reference to…

  • Athtart (ancient deity)

    Astarte, great goddess of the ancient Middle East and chief deity of Tyre, Sidon, and Elat, important Mediterranean seaports. Hebrew scholars now feel that the goddess Ashtoreth mentioned so often in the Bible is a deliberate conflation of the Greek name Astarte and the Hebrew word boshet, “shame,”

  • Athyrium filix-femina (fern)

    Lady fern, (Athyrium filix-femina), a large, feathery fern classified in the family Woodsiaceae, widely cultivated for ornamentation. Leaves are about 75 cm (30 inches) long and 25 cm (10 inches) wide and grow in circular clusters. Characteristic of the genus are curved or horseshoe-shaped

  • Atigun Pass (mountain pass, Alaska, United States)

    Alaskan mountains: Physiography of the northern ranges: Atigun Pass, at the head of the Dietrich River, connects the oil-producing areas of the North Slope with interior Alaska and the south.

  • ATIII (biochemistry)

    Antithrombin (AT), an anticlotting substance occurring in the plasma of blood that functions primarily to block the action of thrombin, an enzyme central to coagulation—the process by which a clot is formed. AT combines with thrombin as well as most of the other activated blood-clotting proteins

  • Atilax paludinosus (mammal)

    mongoose: Natural history: …and are terrestrial, although the marsh mongoose (Atilax paludinosus) and a few others are semiaquatic. Some mongooses live alone or in pairs, but others, such as the banded mongoose (Mungos mungo), dwarf mongooses (genus Helogale), and meerkats, live in large groups. Litters usually consist of two to four young.

  • Atira asteroid (astronomy)

    asteroid: Near-Earth asteroids: Known as Atira asteroids after (163693) Atira, they have mean distances from the Sun that are less than 1 AU and aphelion distances less than 0.983 AU; they do not cross Earth’s orbit.

  • Atīśa (Buddhist religious reformer)

    Atīśa, Indian Buddhist reformer whose teachings formed the basis of the Tibetan Bka’-gdams-pa (“Those Bound by Command”) sect of Buddhism, founded by his disciple ’Brom-ston. Traveling to Tibet in 1038 or 1042 from Nālandā, a centre of Buddhist studies in India, Atīśa established monasteries t

  • Atisha (Buddhist religious reformer)

    Atīśa, Indian Buddhist reformer whose teachings formed the basis of the Tibetan Bka’-gdams-pa (“Those Bound by Command”) sect of Buddhism, founded by his disciple ’Brom-ston. Traveling to Tibet in 1038 or 1042 from Nālandā, a centre of Buddhist studies in India, Atīśa established monasteries t

  • Atitlán, Lago de (lake, Guatemala)

    Lake Atitlán, lake in southwestern Guatemala. It lies in a spectacular setting in the central highlands at about 5,128 feet (1,563 metres) above sea level. The lake, 1,049 feet (320 metres) deep, is 12 miles (19 km) long and 6 miles (10 km) wide, with an area of 49.3 square miles (127.7 square km).

  • Atitlán, Lake (lake, Guatemala)

    Lake Atitlán, lake in southwestern Guatemala. It lies in a spectacular setting in the central highlands at about 5,128 feet (1,563 metres) above sea level. The lake, 1,049 feet (320 metres) deep, is 12 miles (19 km) long and 6 miles (10 km) wide, with an area of 49.3 square miles (127.7 square km).

  • Atiu (island, Cook Islands, Pacific Ocean)

    Atiu, one of the southern Cook Islands, a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. It is the third largest of the Cook Islands and is also known as Enuamanu (“land of birds”). Atiu was settled by Polynesian voyagers about 500 ce and was explored by crew

  • Atiyah, Sir Michael Francis (British mathematician)

    Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, British mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1966 primarily for his work in topology. Atiyah received a knighthood in 1983 and the Order of Merit in 1992. He also served as president of the Royal Society (1990–95). Atiyah’s father was Lebanese and his mother

  • Atiyah-Singer index theorem (mathematics)

    mathematics: Mathematical physics and the theory of groups: …differentiation, culminating in the celebrated Atiyah-Singer theorem for elliptic operators. (Elliptic is a technical term for the type of operator studied in potential theory.) There are remarkable implications for the study of pure geometry, and much attention has been directed to the problem of how the theory of bundles embraces…

  • Atiyoga (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: Rnying-ma-pa: …Anuyoga at death, and the Atiyoga in the present existence.

  • Atjeh (province, Indonesia)

    Aceh, autonomous daerah istimewa (special district) of Indonesia, with the status of propinsi (or provinsi; province), forming the northern extremity of the island of Sumatra. Aceh is surrounded by water on three sides: the Indian Ocean to the west and north and the Strait of Malacca to the east.

  • Atjehnese (people)

    Acehnese, one of the main ethnic groups on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. They were estimated to number roughly 4.2 million in the early 21st century. They speak a language of the Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) family. The Acehnese were ruled by Indian princes prior to 500 ce, and in the 13th

  • Atka mackerel (fish)

    scorpaeniform: Ecology: …of the best-known members, the Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), which is common in the North Pacific and has considerable sporting and commercial fishing value, spends the major part of its life in the open sea. The related Okhotsk Atka mackerel (P. azonus) has been observed in the upper layers of…

  • Atkan Aleut language

    Eskimo-Aleut languages: Aleut: …settled beginning in 1800; and Atkan Aleut, which is spoken also by young people (but no children) on Atka Island, Aleutian Islands, and by some old people on Bering Island, Komandor Islands, Russia, settled in 1826. Attu, once the westernmost Aleut dialect in Alaska, is now extinct in Alaska, but…

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