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  • ash, volcanic (geology)

    Andisol: …the single property of having volcanic-ash parent material. Although these soils exist in all climatic regions, they account for less than 0.75 percent of all the nonpolar continental land area on Earth. Approximately reproducing the geographic distribution of volcanoes, they are found along the circum-Pacific “Ring of Fire” (from the…

  • ash-flow tuff (geology)

    pyroclastic flow: …flows leave deposits known as tuff, which are made up mainly of ash-sized fragments. Nuée ardente deposits are confined mainly in valleys, while ignimbrites form plateaulike deposits that bury the previous topography (the configuration of the surface). Thick ignimbrites that were very hot when erupted may compact and consolidate into…

  • ash-leaved maple (plant)

    Box elder, (Acer negundo), hardy and fast-growing tree, of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), native to the central and eastern United States. Introduced to Europe, it is widely cultivated there as an ornamental. The tree grows to 9–15 m (30–50 feet) tall. The compound leaves (rare among maples)

  • asha (Zoroastrianism)

    providence: Personal and impersonal forms: This idea is called Asha and is the counterpart of Drug, which represents evil and deceit and the disorder connected with them. Asha is connected with the sacred element fire. The Indian concept of rita forms the Indian counterpart of Asha and was the precursor to dharma, a notion…

  • ASHA

    speech disorder: Development of speech correction: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), founded in 1925 in New York City as the American Academy of Speech Correction, became the organizing, examining, and supervisory body for a rapidly growing membership, which surpassed 130,000 by 2008. Many colleges and universities in the United States are accredited…

  • Asha Vahishta (Zoroastrianism)

    amesha spenta: Of the six, Asha Vahishta and Vohu Manah are by far the most important. Asha Vahishta (Avestan: Excellent Order, or Truth) is the lawful order of the cosmos according to which all things happen. He presides over fire, sacred to the Zoroastrians as the inner nature of reality.…

  • Aṣḥāb (Islamic history)

    Companions of the Prophet, in Islām, followers of Muḥammad who had personal contact with him, however slight. In fact, any Muslim who was alive in any part of the Prophet’s lifetime and saw him may be reckoned among the Companions. The first four caliphs, who are the ṣaḥābah held in highest esteem

  • Ashanti (people)

    Asante , people of south-central Ghana and adjacent areas of Togo and Côte d’Ivoire. Most of the Asante live in a region centred on the city of Kumasi, which was the capital of the former independent Asante state. They speak a Twi language of the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo language family and

  • Ashanti Crater (Ghana)

    astrobleme: Using this evidence, the Ashanti Crater in Ghana and the Vredefort Ring structure in South Africa have been identified as probable astroblemes.

  • Ashanti empire (historical empire, Africa)

    Asante empire, West African state that occupied what is now southern Ghana in the 18th and 19th centuries. Extending from the Comoé River in the west to the Togo Mountains in the east, the Asante empire was active in the slave trade in the 18th century and unsuccessfully resisted British

  • Ashanti language (African language)

    Akan languages: Its principal members are Asante (Ashanti), Fante (Fanti), Brong (Abron), and Akuapem. The Akan cluster is located primarily in southern Ghana, although many Brong speakers live in eastern Côte d’Ivoire. Altogether speakers of Akan dialects and languages number more than seven million. Written forms of Asante and Akuapem

  • Ashared-apil-Ekur (ancient Assyrian king)

    chronology: Babylonian chronology before 747 bc: …reign of the Assyrian king Ashared-apil-Ekur (c. 1076–c. 1075 bc) is entirely comprised within the 13-year reign of the Babylonian king Marduk-shapik-zeri. The Assyrian’s dates are probably correct to within one year. Thus, if Marduk-shapik-zeri is dated so that equal proportions of his reign fall before and after that of…

  • Asharite (Islam)

    Ashʿariyyah, in Islam, school of theology supporting the use of reason and speculative theology (kalām) to defend the faith. Followers of the school, which was founded by Abū al-Ḥasan al-Ashʿarī in the 10th century, attempted to demonstrate the existence and nature of God (Allāh) through rational

  • ashavan (Zoroastrianism)

    Zarathustra: Ahura Mazdā and the beneficent immortals: …world of his followers (the ashavan) come close to each other.

  • Ashayqir, Ibrāhīm al- (prime minister of Iraq)

    Ibrāhīm al-Jaʿfarī, vice president (2004–05) and prime minister (2005–06) of Iraq. Jaʿfarī was an avid reader and poet from his youth, and he became an advocate of conservative religious views. In the mid-1960s he joined the Islamic Daʿwah Party, then an underground movement. After completing high

  • Ashbee, Charles Robert (British architect and designer)

    Charles Robert Ashbee, English architect, designer, and leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England during the latter part of the 19th century and after. After education at Wellington College and King’s College, Cambridge, and while actively involved in the social work of Toynbee Hall, Ashbee

  • Ashbery, John (American poet)

    John Ashbery, American poet noted for the elegance, originality, and obscurity of his poetry. Ashbery graduated from Harvard University in 1949 and received a master’s degree from Columbia University in 1951. After working as a copywriter in New York City (1951–55), he lived in Paris until 1965,

  • Ashbery, John Lawrence (American poet)

    John Ashbery, American poet noted for the elegance, originality, and obscurity of his poetry. Ashbery graduated from Harvard University in 1949 and received a master’s degree from Columbia University in 1951. After working as a copywriter in New York City (1951–55), he lived in Paris until 1965,

  • Ashbourne (England, United Kingdom)

    Ashbourne, town (parish), Derbyshire Dales district, administrative and historic county of Derbyshire, central England. Ashbourne is a centre for the surrounding agricultural districts and for tourists visiting nearby Dovedale and the Manyfold Valley. Its buildings include the Church of St. Oswald,

  • Ashburn, Rich (American baseball player)

    Rich Ashburn, American baseball player whose 15-year major league career included two National League batting championships, five All-Star honours, and membership in the 1950 pennant-winning Philadelphia Phillies’ "Whiz Kids" lineup. Following his playing career, he was a broadcaster with the

  • Ashburn, Richie (American baseball player)

    Rich Ashburn, American baseball player whose 15-year major league career included two National League batting championships, five All-Star honours, and membership in the 1950 pennant-winning Philadelphia Phillies’ "Whiz Kids" lineup. Following his playing career, he was a broadcaster with the

  • Ashburn, Whitey (American baseball player)

    Rich Ashburn, American baseball player whose 15-year major league career included two National League batting championships, five All-Star honours, and membership in the 1950 pennant-winning Philadelphia Phillies’ "Whiz Kids" lineup. Following his playing career, he was a broadcaster with the

  • Ashburnham, John (English Royalist)

    John Ashburnham, English Royalist who served Charles I and Charles II as a groom of the bedchamber. The son of Sir John Ashburnham (d. 1620), he began a career at court under the patronage of a prominent kinsman, George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham. He was treasurer of the Royal army during the

  • Ashburton (England, United Kingdom)

    Ashburton, town (parish), Teignbridge district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. The town lies on the southeastern margin of Dartmoor. It was designated a stannary (tin-mining) town in 1285. The priest of the Chantry Chapel of St. Lawrence kept a “free scole,”

  • Ashburton River (river, Australia)

    Ashburton River, river in northwestern Western Australia, rising 140 miles (225 km) southwest of Nullagine on the south slopes of the Ophthalmia Range. It flows through a deep valley, southwest then northwest, entering the Indian Ocean near Exmouth Gulf after a sporadic course of about 400 miles

  • Ashburton, Alexander Baring, 1st Baron (British diplomat)

    Robert Peel: Prime minister and Conservative leader: …settled by the mission of Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton, in 1842 and the Oregon treaty of 1846. The same combination of firmness and conciliation was followed in Ireland. Once the threatening campaign for repeal of the union had been brought to a halt in 1843 with O’Connell’s trial for…

  • Ashburton, John Dunning, 1st Baron (British jurist)

    John Dunning, 1st Baron Ashburton, English jurist and politician who defended the radical John Wilkes against charges of seditious and obscene libel (1763–64) and who is also important as the author of a resolution in Parliament (April 6, 1780) condemning George III for his support of Lord North’s

  • Ashby, Dame Margery Corbett (British women’s rights pioneer)

    Dame Margery Corbett Ashby, British women’s rights pioneer who in 1904 was a founding member of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (renamed International Alliance of Women in 1926). Corbett was the daughter of C.H. Corbett, a classical scholar and a Liberal member of the British Parliament.

  • Ashby, Dame Margery Irene Corbett (British women’s rights pioneer)

    Dame Margery Corbett Ashby, British women’s rights pioneer who in 1904 was a founding member of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (renamed International Alliance of Women in 1926). Corbett was the daughter of C.H. Corbett, a classical scholar and a Liberal member of the British Parliament.

  • Ashby, Hal (American director)

    Hal Ashby, American filmmaker who was one of the preeminent directors of the 1970s. He was especially noted for such films as Harold and Maude (1971), Shampoo (1975), and Being There (1979). Ashby was the youngest of four children. His dairy-farmer father divorced his mother when Ashby was six and

  • Ashby, Michael (British scientist)

    materials science: Aluminum: …by two British materials scientists, Michael Ashby and David Jones, when proper account is taken of the way an actual door panel deflects, constrained as it is by the door edges, it is possible to use aluminum sheet only slightly thicker than the steel it would replace and still achieve…

  • Ashby, William Hal (American director)

    Hal Ashby, American filmmaker who was one of the preeminent directors of the 1970s. He was especially noted for such films as Harold and Maude (1971), Shampoo (1975), and Being There (1979). Ashby was the youngest of four children. His dairy-farmer father divorced his mother when Ashby was six and

  • Ashby-de-la-Zouch (England, United Kingdom)

    North West Leicestershire: … (the district’s administrative centre) and Ashby-de-la-Zouch, are in the upland area bordering Charnwood Forest, a former royal hunting ground to the east. Charnwood Forest consists of a series of barren ridges rising above 900 feet (275 metres) and exposing outcrops of late Precambrian tuffs, some of England’s oldest bedrock.

  • Ashcan School (American art)

    Ashcan School, group of American realist painters based in New York City in the early 20th century. The group’s most prominent figures were known as “The Eight.” See Eight,

  • Ashcraft v. Tennessee (law case)

    confession: Confession in contemporary U.S. law: In Ashcraft v. Tennessee (1944), a case in which a suspect confessed after 36 hours of continuous interrogation under the glare of bright lights, the court made it clear that intense psychological pressure, even in the absence of physical brutality, could render a confession inadmissible.

  • Ashcroft v. Free Speech Coalition (law case)

    Ashcroft v. Free Speech Coalition, case in which, on April 16, 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a lower court’s decision that provisions of the Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) of 1996 were vague and overly broad and thus violated the free-speech protection contained in the First

  • Ashcroft, Edith Margaret Emily (British actress)

    Peggy Ashcroft, English stage actress who appeared in both classic and modern plays. After graduation from London’s Central School of Dramatic Art, Ashcroft made her debut as Margaret in the Birmingham Repertory’s production of Dear Brutus (1926). She made her initial London appearance in 1927, but

  • Ashcroft, John (American politician)

    John Ashcroft, U.S. politician and lawyer, who served as attorney general of the United States (2001–05). He was known for his conservative policies and his support of the USA Patriot Act. After graduating from Yale University (B.A., 1964) and the University of Chicago (J.D., 1967), Ashcroft taught

  • Ashcroft, Peggy (British actress)

    Peggy Ashcroft, English stage actress who appeared in both classic and modern plays. After graduation from London’s Central School of Dramatic Art, Ashcroft made her debut as Margaret in the Birmingham Repertory’s production of Dear Brutus (1926). She made her initial London appearance in 1927, but

  • Ashdod (Israel)

    Ashdod, city of southern Palestine, on the coastal plain of ancient Philistia; since 1948 it has been a city in southwestern Israel and is one of its three international ports and chief industrial centres. In antiquity Ashdod was a member of the Philistine pentapolis (five cities). Although the

  • Ashdown, Paddy (British politician)

    Liberal Democrats: History: Paddy Ashdown, a former Liberal and a member of Parliament for Yeovil (Somerset), was elected the first leader of the new party in July 1988. Ashdown’s avowed strategy was initially one of “equidistance” between Labour and the Conservatives. He sought to ensure that the new…

  • Ashe, Arthur (American tennis player)

    Arthur Ashe, American tennis player, the first black winner of a major men’s singles championship. Ashe began to play tennis at the age of seven in a neighbourhood park. He was coached by Walter Johnson of Lynchburg, Virginia, who had coached tennis champion Althea Gibson. Ashe moved to St. Louis,

  • Ashe, Arthur Robert (American tennis player)

    Arthur Ashe, American tennis player, the first black winner of a major men’s singles championship. Ashe began to play tennis at the age of seven in a neighbourhood park. He was coached by Walter Johnson of Lynchburg, Virginia, who had coached tennis champion Althea Gibson. Ashe moved to St. Louis,

  • Asheboro (North Carolina, United States)

    Asheboro, city, seat (1796) of Randolph county, central North Carolina, U.S. It lies in the forested Uwharrie Mountains about 25 miles (40 km) south of Greensboro. Asheboro (originally Asheborough) was founded in 1796 on land that was once the home of Keyauwee Indians; a prehistoric Native American

  • Ashendene Press (British publishing company)

    typography: The private-press movement: …great English private press, the Ashendene, was conducted by C.H. St. John Hornby, a partner in the English booksellers W.H. Smith and Son. Hornby in 1900 met Emery Walker and Sydney Cockerell (Morris’ secretary at the Kelmscott Press), who encouraged and instructed him and helped in devising two types for…

  • Asher (Hebrew tribe)

    Asher, one of the 12 tribes of Israel that in biblical times constituted the people of Israel who later became the Jewish people. The tribe was named after the younger of two sons born to Jacob (also called Israel) and Zilpah, the maidservant of Jacob’s first wife, Leah. After the Israelites took

  • Asher ben Jehiel (Spanish rabbi)

    Asher ben Jehiel, major codifier of the Talmud, the rabbinical compendium of law, lore, and commentary. His work was a source for the great codes of his son Jacob ben Asher (1269–1340) and of Joseph Karo (1488–1575). When the German authorities began to persecute the Jews, Asher fled to France a

  • Asher, Peter (British singer and producer)

    Linda Ronstadt: Produced by Briton Peter Asher, Ronstadt’s album Heart Like a Wheel (1974) sold more than a million copies. It also established the formula she would follow on several successful albums, mixing traditional folk songs, covers of rock and roll standards, and new material by contemporary songwriters (e.g., Anna…

  • Asherah (research vessel)

    archaeology: Underwater archaeology: …a two-man submarine, the “Asherah,” launched in 1964. The “Asherah” was the first submarine ever built for archaeological investigation.

  • Asherah (Semitic goddess)

    Asherah, ancient West Semitic goddess, consort of the supreme god. Her principal epithet was probably “She Who Walks on the Sea.” She was occasionally called Elath (Elat), “the Goddess,” and may have also been called Qudshu, “Holiness.” According to texts from Ugarit (modern Ras Shamra, Syria),

  • Ashes (cricket)

    Ashes, symbol of victory in the usually biennial cricket Test (international) match series between select national teams of England and Australia, first staged in 1877. Its name stems from an epitaph published in 1882 after the Australian team had won its first victory over England in England, at

  • Ashes (work by Deledda)

    Grazia Deledda: …his brother’s bride; Cenere (1904; Ashes; film, 1916, starring Eleonora Duse), in which an illegitimate son causes his mother’s suicide; and La madre (1920; The Woman and the Priest; U.S. title, The Mother), the tragedy of a mother who realizes her dream of her son’s becoming a priest only to…

  • Ashes and Diamonds (film by Wajda)

    Andrzej Wajda: …and Popiół i diament (1958; Ashes and Diamonds), constituted a popular trilogy that is considered to have launched the Polish film school. The movies deal in symbolic imagery with sweeping social and political changes in Poland during the World War II-era German occupation, the Warsaw Uprising of 1944, and the…

  • Ashes and Diamonds (work by Andrzejewski)

    Jerzy Andrzejewski: …in Popiół i diament (1948; Ashes and Diamonds), translated into 27 languages and generally considered his finest novel. It presents a dramatic conflict between young Polish patriots and the communist regime during the last days of World War II. In 1958 Andrzej Wajda, the leading director of the Polish cinema,…

  • Ashes and Embers (work by Frashëri)

    Albanian literature: …Mid’hat Frashëri, who subsequently wrote Hi dhe shpuzë (1915; “Ashes and Embers”), a book of short stories and reflections of a didactic nature.

  • Ashes of Time (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1994])

    Wong Kar-Wai: …Dung che sai duk (1994; Ashes of Time), took two years to make. (Wong preferred an improvisational style of filmmaking, without a finished script, that often led to long shoots.) Instead of adapting the novel, however, he borrowed three of its characters, for whom he created a prequel centred on…

  • Asheton, Ron (American musician)

    Ron Asheton, (Ronald Franklin Asheton), American guitarist (born July 17, 1948, Washington, D.C.—found dead Jan. 6, 2009, Ann Arbor, Mich.), was the guitarist for the Stooges, an American rock band of the late 1960s and early ’70s that helped define punk music; described by one critic as the

  • Asheton, Scott (American musician)

    Iggy and the Stooges: …2009, Ann Arbor), and drummer Scott Asheton (b. August 16, 1949, Ann Arbor—d. March 15, 2014, Ann Arbor).

  • Ashevak, Kenojuak (Inuit artist)

    Kenojuak Ashevak, Inuit artist (born Oct. 3, 1927, Ikerrasak camp, Baffin Island, N.W.T. [now in Nunavut]—died Jan. 8, 2013, Cape Dorset, Baffin Island), was a pioneer of Inuit printmaking and was regarded as one of Canada’s top artists; her best-known image, The Enchanted Owl (1960), was used on a

  • Asheville (North Carolina, United States)

    Asheville, city, seat of Buncombe county, west-central North Carolina, U.S. Asheville lies in the Blue Ridge Mountains, at the junction of the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers. It has a mild climate and is built on an uneven plateau at an elevation of about 2,200 feet (670 metres). Asheville is

  • Ashfield (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Ashfield, district, administrative and historic county of Nottinghamshire, England. The name is ancient and appeared in the names of the two major towns within the district even before its formation. The two towns are the former coal-mining centres of Kirkby-in-Ashfield and Sutton-in-Ashfield,

  • Ashford (England, United Kingdom)

    Ashford, town and borough (district), administrative and historic county of Kent, southeastern England. It was established in 1974 from the former urban district of Ashford, rural districts of East and West Ashford, and the metropolitan borough and rural district of Tenterden. The old town of

  • Ashford (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Ashford: borough (district), administrative and historic county of Kent, southeastern England. It was established in 1974 from the former urban district of Ashford, rural districts of East and West Ashford, and the metropolitan borough and rural district of Tenterden.

  • Ashford, Evelyn (American athlete)

    Evelyn Ashford, renowned American sprinter who excelled in the 100 metres. She was a four-time Olympian and won four gold medals. At her high school in California, Ashford was invited to join the all-male track-and-field team when she outdistanced a number of its members in a series of races; she

  • Ashford, Nick (American lyricist and singer)

    Nick(olas) Ashford, American lyricist and singer (born May 4, 1941, Fairfield, S.C.—died Aug. 22, 2011, New York, N.Y.), created (1966–73) an amazing songbook together with composer Valerie Simpson (his wife from 1974) that spanned such genres as soul, rhythm and blues, and funk; their heartfelt

  • Ashford, Nickolas (American lyricist and singer)

    Nick(olas) Ashford, American lyricist and singer (born May 4, 1941, Fairfield, S.C.—died Aug. 22, 2011, New York, N.Y.), created (1966–73) an amazing songbook together with composer Valerie Simpson (his wife from 1974) that spanned such genres as soul, rhythm and blues, and funk; their heartfelt

  • Ashford-Holmes, Rosalind (American singer)

    Martha and the Vandellas: …Detroit, Michigan), Gloria Williams, and Rosalind Ashford (b. September 2, 1943, Detroit). Later members included Betty Kelly (b. September 16, 1944, Attalla, Alabama), Lois Reeves (b. April 12, 1948, Detroit), and Sandra Tilley (b. May 6, 1946—d. September 9, 1981).

  • Ashgabat (national capital, Turkmenistan)

    Ashgabat, city and capital of Turkmenistan. It lies in an oasis at the northern foot of the Kopet-Dag (Turkmen: Köpetdag) Range and on the edge of the Karakum (Turkmen: Garagum) Desert, about 19 miles (30 km) from the Iranian frontier. It was founded in 1881 as a Russian military fort and took the

  • Ashgabat National Museum of History (museum, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan)

    Turkmenistan: Cultural institutions: …notable of these is the National Museum of History, which features a sizeable number of exhibits representing 50,000 years of Turkmenistan’s history. Another museum, housed in the gold-domed Palace of Knowledge, celebrates and glorifies Niyazov. The city is full of marble edifices and golden statues, most of which were erected…

  • Ashhotep (Egyptian queen)

    jewelry: Egyptian: …in the tomb of Queen Ashhotep (18th dynasty) is a typical Egyptian bracelet. It is rigid and can be opened by means of a hinge. The front part is decorated with a vulture, whose outspread wings cover the front half of the bracelet. The whole figure of the bird is…

  • Ashi (Babylonian-Jewish scholar)

    Ashi, preeminent Babylonian amora, or interpreter of the Mishna, the legal compilation that was the basis of the Talmud, the authoritative rabbinical compendium. Ashi was head of the Jewish Academy at Sura, Babylonia, and was one of two chief editors who fixed the canon of the Babylonian Talmud.

  • Ashida Hitoshi (prime minister of Japan)

    Japan: Political trends: A similar fate confronted Ashida Hitoshi, who became prime minister for five months in 1948. Yoshida’s return to power in the fall of 1948 resulted in a more stable situation and ushered in the Yoshida era, which lasted until 1954. During those years, Japan capitalized on the economic benefits…

  • ashide (lacquerwork)

    lacquerwork: Japan: …interwoven with the pattern (ashide). The process called Kamakura-bori, carved wood thickly lacquered with red or black, also dates from this period and continued to flourish for another two centuries or so. During this epoch occurred the beginnings of the characteristic Japanese treatment of landscape and flower subjects in…

  • ashide-e (Japanese calligraphy)

    Ashide-e, (Japanese: “reed-script picture”), decorative, cursive style of Japanese calligraphy, the characters of which resemble natural objects, that is used to decorate scrolls, stationery, and lacquerware. The typical ashide-e is a decorative representation of a poem, in which stylized

  • Ashiggāʾ Party (political party, Sudan)

    Ismāʿīl al-Azharī: …the Congress, al-Azharī organized the Ashiggāʾ (“Brothers”) party; his opposition to the British proposal for self-government in the Sudan brought about his arrest in December 1948.

  • Ashihe (China)

    Acheng, former city, central Heilongjiang sheng (province), far northeastern China. In 2006 it was incorporated into the city of Harbin, and it became a southeastern district of that city. It was originally named Ashihe, for the Ashi River that flows through the eastern part of the city. Acheng was

  • Ashikaga (Japan)

    Ashikaga, city, southwestern Tochigi ken (prefecture), northeast-central Honshu, Japan. It is located on the Watarase River at the northern edge of the Kantō Plain. Ashikaga was the site of a former classical school, the Ashikaga Gakkō, founded in the 9th century; according to one tradition, its

  • Ashikaga bakufu (Japanese dynasty)

    Japan: The Muromachi (or Ashikaga) period (1338–1573): On the accession of Go-Daigo, the retired emperor Go-Uda broke the long-established custom and dissolved the office of retired emperor (in no chō). As a result, the entire authority of the imperial government was concentrated…

  • Ashikaga family (Japanese family)

    Ashikaga family, Japanese warrior family that established the Ashikaga shogunate in 1338. The founder, Ashikaga Takauji (1305–58), supported the emperor Go-Daigo’s attempt to wrest control of the country from the Hōjō family, but then turned on him and set up an emperor from another branch of the

  • Ashikaga Gakkō (school, Ashikaga, Japan)

    Ashikaga: …a former classical school, the Ashikaga Gakkō, founded in the 9th century; according to one tradition, its founder was the poet Ono Takamura. The school was restored in 1432 by a nobleman, Uesugi Norizane, who engaged a Buddhist monk to head the school and imported a number of classical Chinese…

  • Ashikaga period (Japanese history)

    Muromachi period, in Japanese history, period of the Ashikaga Shogunate (1338–1573). It was named for a district in Kyōto, where the first Ashikaga shogun, Takauji, established his administrative headquarters. Although Takauji took the title of shogun for himself and his heirs, complete control o

  • Ashikaga shogunate (Japanese dynasty)

    Japan: The Muromachi (or Ashikaga) period (1338–1573): On the accession of Go-Daigo, the retired emperor Go-Uda broke the long-established custom and dissolved the office of retired emperor (in no chō). As a result, the entire authority of the imperial government was concentrated…

  • Ashikaga Tadayoshi (Japanese military leader)

    Ashikaga Tadayoshi, military and administrative genius who engineered many of the triumphs of his older brother, Ashikaga Takauji, the founder of the Ashikaga shogunate (hereditary military dictatorship) that dominated Japan from 1338 to 1573. When in 1333 Takauji joined forces with the emperor

  • Ashikaga Takauji (Japanese shogun)

    Ashikaga Takauji, warrior and statesman who founded the Ashikaga shogunate (hereditary military dictatorship) that dominated Japan from 1338 to 1573. The Ashikaga family became one of the most powerful in Japan during the Kamakura period (1199–1333). They provided leading retainers of the Hōjō

  • Ashikaga Yoshiaki (Japanese shogun)

    Ashikaga Yoshiaki, shogun (hereditary military dictator) of Japan who was the 15th and last of his family to hold the title. Yoshiaki had been a priest, but in 1568, with the aid of his protector, the general Oda Nobunaga, he deposed his cousin Yoshihide and took over the shogunate. Subsequently,

  • Ashikaga Yoshimasa (Japanese shogun)

    Ashikaga Yoshimasa, shogun (hereditary military dictator) who helped promote one of Japan’s greatest cultural eras. His attempts to select an heir, however, brought on a dispute that caused the great Ōnin War (1467–77). This conflict not only laid waste the area around the capital at Kyōto and

  • Ashikaga Yoshimitsu (Japanese shogun)

    Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, shogun (hereditary military dictator) of Japan, who achieved political stability for the Ashikaga shogunate, which had been established in 1338 by his grandfather, Ashikaga Takauji. The period of this shogunate’s rule (until 1573) subsequently became known as the Muromachi

  • Ashini (work by Thériault)

    Yves Thériault: …family in a Gentile world; Ashini (1960), a lyrical tale of the last chief of the Innu (Montagnais) to live by ancestral customs; and N’Tsuk (1968), the life story of a 100-year-old Inuit woman. Thériault’s works were widely translated and won him many awards.

  • ʿĀshiq Pasha (Turkish author)

    Aşık Paşa, poet who was one of the most important figures in early Turkish literature. Very little about his life is known. A wealthy and respected figure in his community, he apparently was also a very religious sheikh (mystic leader, hence his name, Aşık, which means lover, given to an ecstatic m

  • Ashiqqāʾ Party (political party, Sudan)

    Ismāʿīl al-Azharī: …the Congress, al-Azharī organized the Ashiggāʾ (“Brothers”) party; his opposition to the British proposal for self-government in the Sudan brought about his arrest in December 1948.

  • ʿĀshir min Ramaḍān, Madīnat al- (Egypt)

    Madīnat al-ʿĀshir min Ramaḍān, (Arabic: “Tenth of Ramadan City”) city, western Al-Ismāʿīliyyah muḥāfaẓah (governorate), east of the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt. Construction of this industrial centre began in 1977 as part of the Egyptian government’s program to shift population and industry away

  • Ashiya (Japan)

    Ashiya, city, southeastern Hyōgo ken (prefecture), west-central Honshu, Japan. It is surrounded by the Rokkō Mountains and faces Ōsaka Bay. Ashiya is located on railway lines and highways between Kōbe (west) and Ōsaka (east), and it has been known for its beauty since the Heian period (794–1185),

  • Ashkabad (national capital, Turkmenistan)

    Ashgabat, city and capital of Turkmenistan. It lies in an oasis at the northern foot of the Kopet-Dag (Turkmen: Köpetdag) Range and on the edge of the Karakum (Turkmen: Garagum) Desert, about 19 miles (30 km) from the Iranian frontier. It was founded in 1881 as a Russian military fort and took the

  • Ashkadarskaya Landing (Russia)

    Sterlitamak, city, Bashkortostan republic, western Russia. The city lies along the Belaya River at its confluence with the Sterlya. The small settlement of Ashkadarskaya Landing became the city of Sterlitamak in 1781, but it prospered only after 1940 with the development of the Volga-Urals oil

  • Ashkelon (Israel)

    Ashqelon, city on the coastal plain of Palestine, since 1948 in southwestern Israel. The modern city lies 12 miles (19 km) north of Gaza and 1.25 miles (2 km) east-northeast of the ancient city site. Because of its location on the Mediterranean coast, Ashqelon was traditionally the key to the

  • Ashkenazi (people)

    Ashkenazi, member of the Jews who lived in the Rhineland valley and in neighbouring France before their migration eastward to Slavic lands (e.g., Poland, Lithuania, Russia) after the Crusades (11th–13th century) and their descendants. After the 17th-century persecutions in eastern Europe, large

  • Ashkenazi Haredim (Jewish group)

    fundamentalism: The Ashkenazi ultra-Orthodox: The Ashkenazi Haredi political parties have concentrated primarily on obtaining funding for their communities and on enforcing strict conformity to their interpretation of Jewish religious law concerning issues such as observance of Shabbat, conversion, kosher dietary laws, and, in their view, the desecration…

  • Ashkenazi ultra-Orthodox (Jewish group)

    fundamentalism: The Ashkenazi ultra-Orthodox: The Ashkenazi Haredi political parties have concentrated primarily on obtaining funding for their communities and on enforcing strict conformity to their interpretation of Jewish religious law concerning issues such as observance of Shabbat, conversion, kosher dietary laws, and, in their view, the desecration…

  • Ashkenazi, Eliyahu ben Asher ha-Levi (Italian grammarian)

    Elijah Bokher Levita, German-born Jewish grammarian whose writings and teaching furthered the study of Hebrew in European Christendom at a time of widespread hostility toward the Jews. Levita went to Italy early in life and in 1504 settled at Padua. There he wrote a manual of Hebrew (1508) that was

  • Ashkenazi, Vladimir Davidovich (Icelandic musician)

    Vladimir Ashkenazy, Russian-born Icelandic pianist and conductor whose extensive piano repertoire included works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Sergey Rachmaninoff. Both of Ashkenazy’s parents were professional pianists. Beginning piano lessons

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