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  • Abū Tamīm Maʿad (Fāṭimid caliph)

    Al-Muʿizz, the most powerful of the Fāṭimid caliphs, whose armies conquered Egypt and who made the newly founded Al-Qāhirah, or Cairo, his capital in 972–973. He was about 22 years of age when he succeeded his father, al-Mansur, in 953 with the title of al-Muʿizz. His authority was acknowledged

  • Abū Tammām (Syrian poet)

    Abū Tammām, poet and editor of an anthology of early Arabic poems known as the Ḥamāsah. Abū Tammām changed his Christian father’s name of Thādhūs to Aws and invented for himself an Arab genealogy. In his youth he worked in Damascus as a weaver’s assistant but on going to Egypt began to study

  • Abū Tammām Ḥabīb ibn Aws (Syrian poet)

    Abū Tammām, poet and editor of an anthology of early Arabic poems known as the Ḥamāsah. Abū Tammām changed his Christian father’s name of Thādhūs to Aws and invented for himself an Arab genealogy. In his youth he worked in Damascus as a weaver’s assistant but on going to Egypt began to study

  • Abu Telfan, oder die Heimkehr vom Mondgebirge (work by Raabe)

    Wilhelm Raabe: (1868; Abu Telfan, Return from the Mountains of the Moon), and Der Schüdderump, 3 vol. (1870; “The Rickety Cart”). These three novels are often viewed as a trilogy that is central to Raabe’s generally pessimistic outlook, which views the difficulties of the individual in a world…

  • Abu Telfan, Return from the Mountains of the Moon (work by Raabe)

    Wilhelm Raabe: (1868; Abu Telfan, Return from the Mountains of the Moon), and Der Schüdderump, 3 vol. (1870; “The Rickety Cart”). These three novels are often viewed as a trilogy that is central to Raabe’s generally pessimistic outlook, which views the difficulties of the individual in a world…

  • Abū Widān, Aḥmad Pasha (Egyptian governor of The Sudan)

    Sudan: Muḥammad ʿAlī and his successors: His successor, Aḥmad Pasha Abū Widān, continued his policies with but few exceptions and made it his primary concern to root out official corruption. Abū Widān dealt ruthlessly with offenders or those who sought to thwart his schemes to reorganize taxation. He was particularly fond of the…

  • Abū Yaḥyā (Marīnid ruler)

    Marīnid dynasty: …when, in 1248, their ruler, Abū Yaḥyā, captured Fès (Fez) and made it the Marīnid capital. With the defeat of the last of the Almohads and the capture of Marrakech in 1269, the Marīnids, under Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb, became masters of Morocco. In order to fulfill what they viewed as…

  • Abū Yaḥyā Abū Bakr (Ḥafṣid ruler)

    Abū al-Ḥasan ʿAlī: …and married a daughter of Abū Bakr, the Ḥafṣid ruler of Tunisia, which by 1342 had become a virtual vassal state. After Abū Bakr’s death Abū al-Ḥasan invaded Tunisia and captured Tunis (Sept. 15, 1347), but in the following April he was badly defeated by a confederation of Tunisian tribes…

  • Abū Yaʿqūb Isḥaq ibn Sulaymān al-Isrāʾīlī (Jewish physician and philosopher)

    Isaac ben Solomon Israeli, Jewish physician and philosopher, widely reputed in the European Middle Ages for his scientific writings and regarded as the father of medieval Jewish Neoplatonism. Although there is considerable disagreement about his birth and death dates, he is known to have lived more

  • Abū Yaʿqūb Yūsuf (Almohad and Muʾminid ruler)

    Almohads: …virtually intact until the caliph Abū Yaʿqūb Yūsuf (reigned 1163–84) forced the surrender of Sevilla (Seville) in 1172; the extension of Almohad rule over the rest of Islamic Spain followed. During the reign of Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb al-Manṣūr (1184–99) serious Arab rebellions devastated the eastern provinces of the empire, whereas…

  • Abū Yūsuf (Muslim scholar)

    Ḥanafī school: …as spread by his disciples Abū Yūsuf (died 798) and Muḥammad al-Shaybānī (749/750–805) and became the dominant system of Islamic administration for the ʿAbbāsids and Ottomans. Although the Ḥanafī school acknowledges the Qurʾān and the Hadith (narratives concerning the Prophet Muhammad’s life and

  • Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb (Marīnid ruler)

    Marīnid dynasty: … in 1269, the Marīnids, under Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb, became masters of Morocco. In order to fulfill what they viewed as the duty of Muslim sovereignty and to acquire religious prestige, they declared a jihad (holy war) in Spain until the mid-14th century. Although the war helped the Muslim Naṣrid dynasty…

  • Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb ibn ʿAbd al-Muʾmin al-Manṣūr (Almohad and Muʾminid ruler)

    Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb al-Manṣūr, third ruler of the Muʾminid dynasty of Spain and North Africa, who during his reign (1184–99) brought the power of his dynasty to its zenith. When his father, Abū Yaʿqūb Yūsuf, died on July 29, 1184, Abū Yūsuf Yaʿqūb succeeded to the throne with minor difficulties. In

  • Abū Ẓaby (national capital, United Arab Emirates)

    Abu Dhabi, city and capital of Abū Ẓaby emirate, one of the United Arab Emirates (formerly Trucial States, or Trucial Oman), and the national capital of that federation. The city occupies most of a small triangular island of the same name, just off the Persian Gulf coast and connected to the

  • Abū Ẓaby (emirate, United Arab Emirates)

    Abu Dhabi, constituent emirate of the United Arab Emirates (formerly Trucial States, or Trucial Oman). Though its international boundaries are disputed, it is unquestionably the largest of the country’s seven constituent emirates, with more than three-fourths of the area of the entire federation.

  • Abū Zakariyyāʾ Yaḥyā (Ḥafṣid ruler)

    Ḥafṣid dynasty: …founded by the Almohad governor Abū Zakariyyāʾ Yaḥyā about 1229. In the 20 years of his rule, Abū Zakariyyāʾ kept the various tribal disputes and intrigues under control, ensured Ḥafṣid economic prosperity by trade agreements with Italian, Spanish, and Provençal communities, and expanded his power into northern Morocco and Spain.…

  • Abū Zayd al-Sarūjī (literary character)

    al-Ḥarīrī: …Hammām, his repeated encounters with Abū Zayd al-Sarūjī, an unabashed confidence artist and wanderer possessing all the eloquence, grammatical knowledge, and poetic ability of al-Ḥarīrī himself. Time and again, al-Ḥārith finds Abū Zayd at the centre of a throng of people in a new city. Abū Zayd brings tears to…

  • Abū Zayd, Naṣr Ḥāmid (Egyptian scholar)

    Naṣr Ḥāmid Abū Zayd, Egyptian scholar whose interpretations of the Qurʾān challenged mainstream views and sparked controversy and debate. Abū Zayd attended Cairo University and received a Ph.D. in Arab and Islamic studies. His research and writings on Qurʾānic exegesis, including his well-known

  • Abu ʾl-Tāhir Muḥammad ben Yaʿḳūb ben Muḥammad ben Ibrāhīm Majd al-Dīn al-Shāfiʿī al-Shīrāzī al-Fīrūzābādī (Iranian lexicographer)

    Al-Fīrūzābādī, lexicographer who compiled an extensive dictionary of Arabic that, in its digest form, Al-Qāmūs (“The Ocean”), served as the basis of later European dictionaries of Arabic. After teaching in Jerusalem (1349–59), al-Fīrūzābādī traveled through western Asia and Egypt and settled at

  • Abū ʿAbd al-Raḥmān al-Khalīl ibn Aḥmad al-Farāhīdī al-Azdī (Arab philologist)

    Al-Khalīl ibn Aḥmad, Arab philologist who compiled the first Arabic dictionary and is credited with the formulation of the rules of Arabic prosody. When he moved to Basra, al-Khalīl left the Ṣufriyyah division of the Khārijites, which was popular in his native Oman. He lived simply and piously in

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh al-Ḥarith ibn Asad al-ʿAnazī al-Muḥāsibī (Muslim theologian)

    Al-Muḥāsibī, (Arabic: “He Who Examines His Conscience”, ) eminent Muslim mystic (Ṣūfī) and theologian renowned for his psychological refinement of pietistic devotion and his role as a precursor of the doctrine of later Muslim orthodoxy. His main work was ar-Ri ʿāyah li-ḥūqūq Allah, in which he

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh ibn Yūsuf ibn Naṣr al-Aḥmar (Naṣrid ruler)

    Alhambra: History: …1358, in the reigns of Ibn al-Aḥmar, founder of the Naṣrid dynasty, and his successors. The splendid decorations of the interior are ascribed to Yūsuf I (died 1354). After the expulsion of the Moors in 1492, much of the interior was effaced and the furniture was ruined or removed. Charles…

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Mālik ibn Anas ibn al-Ḥārith al-Aṣbaḥī (Muslim legal scholar)

    Mālik ibn Anas, Muslim legist who played an important role in formulating early Islamic legal doctrines. Few details are known about Mālik ibn Anas’ life, most of which was spent in the city of Medina. He became learned in Islamic law and attracted a considerable number of students, his followers

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad al-Zaghal (Naṣrid sultan)

    Muḥammad XII: …was deposed by his brother al-Zaghal (Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad al-Zaghal). On Boabdil’s first military venture (1483) against the Castilians, he was captured and to obtain his release signed the Pact of Córdoba, promising to deliver to the Castilians that part of his domain that was in the control of…

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Abī Isḥāq Ibrāhīm an-Nafzī al-Ḥimyarī al-Rundī (Islamic theologian)

    Ibn ʿAbbād, Islamic theologian who became the leading mystical thinker of North Africa in the 14th century. Attracted to Morocco by the famous madrasas (religious colleges), Ibn ʿAbbād immigrated there at an early age. He abandoned legal studies in a quest for mystical knowledge. In 1359 he settled

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Idrīs ash-Shāfiʿī (Muslim legist)

    Abū ʿAbd Allāh ash-Shāfiʿī, Muslim legal scholar who played an important role in the formation of Islāmic legal thought and was the founder of the Shāfiʿīyah school of law. He also made a basic contribution to religious and legal methodology with respect to the use of traditions. Little is known

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Ismāʿīl al-Bukhārī (Muslim scholar)

    Al-Bukhārī, one of the greatest Muslim compilers and scholars of Hadith (the recorded corpus of the sayings and acts of the Prophet Muhammad). His chief work is accepted by Sunni Muslims—i.e., those following the majority tradition—as second only to the Qurʾān as both a source of religious law and

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Jābir ibn Sinān al-Battānī al-Ḥarrānī al-Ṣābiʾ (Arab astronomer and mathematician)

    Al-Battānī, Arab astronomer and mathematician who refined existing values for the length of the year and of the seasons, for the annual precession of the equinoxes, and for the inclination of the ecliptic. He showed that the position of the Sun’s apogee, or farthest point from the Earth, is

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Idrīs al-Ḥammūdi al-Ḥasanī al-Idrīsī (Arab geographer)

    Ash-Sharīf al-Idrīsī, Arab geographer, an adviser to Roger II, the Norman king of Sicily. He wrote one of the greatest works of medieval geography, Kitāb nuzhat al-mushtāq fī ikhtirāq al-āfāq (“The Pleasure Excursion of One Who Is Eager to Traverse the Regions of the World”). Al-Idrīsī traced his

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn Tūmart (Berber Muslim leader)

    Ibn Tūmart, Berber spiritual and military leader who founded the al-Muwaḥḥidūn confederation in North Africa (see Almohads). The doctrine he taught combined a strict conception of the unity of God with a program of juridical and puritanical moral reform, based on a study of the Qurʾān and of t

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh al-Lawātī al-Tanjī ibn Baṭṭūṭah (Muslim explorer and writer)

    Ibn Battuta, the greatest medieval Muslim traveler and the author of one of the most famous travel books, the Riḥlah (Travels). His great work describes his extensive travels covering some 75,000 miles (120,000 km) in trips to almost all of the Muslim countries and as far as China and Sumatra (now

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Abī Bakr ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn ʿAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Aḥmad ibn Abī Bakr al-Qudāʿī (Islamic scholar)

    Ibn al-Abbār, historian, theologian, and humorist who became one of the most famous students of Islamic Spain. Ibn al-Abbār began his official career as a secretary to the Muslim governor of the Emirate of Balansiya. After the fall of Valencia (September 1238), he settled in Tunisia and was

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn ʿUmar al-Wāqidī (Arabian historian)

    Al-Wāqidī, Arab historian, author of the Kitāb al-maghāzī, a well-known work on the military campaigns (al-maghāzī) of the Prophet Muhammad. As a youth al-Wāqidī is said to have been such an authority on the sacred cities of Mecca and Medina that he was guide to the ʿAbbāsid caliph Hārūn ar-Rashīd

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad ibn ʿUmar ibn al-Ḥusayn Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī (Muslim theologian)

    Fakhr ad-Dīn ar-Rāzī, Muslim theologian and scholar, author of one of the most authoritative commentaries on the Qurʾān in the history of Islām. His aggressiveness and vengefulness created many enemies and involved him in numerous intrigues. His intellectual brilliance, however, was universally a

  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad XI (Naṣrid ruler)

    Muḥammad XII, last Naṣrid sultan of Granada, Spain. His reign (1482–92) was marked by incessant civil strife and the fall of Granada to Ferdinand and Isabella, the Roman Catholic rulers of Aragon and Castile. Instigated by his mother, a jealous wife, Boabdil rebelled against his father, the sultan

  • Abū ʿAbdallāh ibn Mājā (Muslim scholar)

    ʿilm al-ḥadīth: 892), Ibn Mājāh (d. 886), and an-Nasāʾī (d. 915)—came to be recognized as canonical in orthodox Islam, though the books of al-Bukhārī and Muslim enjoy a prestige that virtually eclipses the other four.

  • Abū ʿAbdollāh Jaʿfar ibn Moḥammad (Persian poet)

    Rūdakī, the first poet of note to compose poems in the “New Persian,” written in Arabic alphabet, widely regarded as the father of Persian poetry. A talented singer and instrumentalist, Rūdakī served as a court poet to the Sāmānid ruler Naṣr II (914–943) in Bukhara until he fell out of favour in

  • Abū ʿAlī (Sīmjūrid ruler)

    Sīmjūrid Dynasty: Abū ol-Ḥasan’s son Abū ʿAlī added Herāt to the domains.

  • Abū ʿAlī Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad ibn Yaʿqūb ibn Miskawayh (Islamic scholar)

    Ibn Miskawayh, Persian scientist, philosopher, and historian whose scholarly works became models for later generations of Islamic thinkers. Little is known of Ibn Miskawayh’s personal life. It is believed he converted to Islam from Zoroastrianism, the religion of pre-Islamic Iran. His interests

  • Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥasan ibn al-Haytham (Arab astronomer and mathematician)

    Ibn al-Haytham, mathematician and astronomer who made significant contributions to the principles of optics and the use of scientific experiments. Conflicting stories are told about the life of Ibn al-Haytham, particularly concerning his scheme to regulate the Nile. In one version, told by the

  • Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Sīnā (Persian philosopher and scientist)

    Avicenna, Muslim physician, the most famous and influential of the philosopher-scientists of the medieval Islamic world. He was particularly noted for his contributions in the fields of Aristotelian philosophy and medicine. He composed the Kitāb al-shifāʾ (Book of the Cure), a vast philosophical

  • Abū ʿAlī al-Manṣūr (Fāṭimid caliph)

    Al-Ḥākim, sixth ruler of the Egyptian Shīʿite Fāṭimid dynasty, noted for his eccentricities and cruelty, especially his persecutions of Christians and Jews. He is held by adherents of the Druze religion to be a divine incarnation. Al-Ḥākim was named caliph in 996 and depended at first on the Berber

  • Abū ʿAlī Ḥasan ibn ʿAlī ibn Isḥāq al-Ṭūsī (Seljuq vizier)

    Niẓām al-Mulk, (Arabic: “Order of the Kingdom”) Persian vizier of the Turkish Seljuq sultans (1063–92), best remembered for his large treatise on kingship, Seyāsat-nāmeh (The Book of Government; or, Rules for Kings). Niẓām al-Mulk was the son of a revenue official for the Ghaznavid dynasty. Through

  • Abū ʿAlī Muḥammad ibn ʿAlī ibn Muqlah (Islamic calligrapher)

    Ibn Muqlah, one of the foremost calligraphers of the ʿAbbāsid Age (750–1258), reputed inventor of the first cursive style of Arabic lettering, the naskhī script, which replaced the angular Kūfic as the standard of Islamic calligraphy. In the naskhī script Ibn Muqlah introduced the rounded forms and

  • Abū ʿAlī Muṣṭafā (Palestinian nationalist)

    Abū ʿAlī Muṣṭafā, Palestinian nationalist who was a cofounder (1967) and secretary-general (2000–01) of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), a radical faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). Born Muṣṭafā al-Zibrī, he later took the nom de guerre Abū ʿAlī

  • Abū ʿAmr ibn al-ʿAlāʾ (Arab philologist)

    al-Aṣmaʿī: A gifted student of Abū ʿAmr ibn al-ʿAlāʾ, the founder of the Basra school, al-Aṣmaʿī joined the court of the ʿAbbāsid caliph Hārūn al-Rashīd in Baghdad. Renowned for his piety and plain living, he was a tutor to the caliph’s sons (the future caliphs al-Amīn and al-Maʾmūn) and a…

  • Abu ʿAmr ʿAbbād (ʿAbbādid ruler [1042–1069])

    ʿAbbādid dynasty: His son Abu ʿAmr ʿAbbād, known as al-Muʿtaḍid (1042–69), greatly enlarged his territory by forcibly annexing the minor kingdoms of Mertola, Niebla, Huelva, Saltés, Silves, and Santa María de Algarve.

  • Abū ʿImran Mūsā ibn Maymūn ibn ʿUbayd Allāh (Jewish philosopher, scholar, and physician)

    Moses Maimonides, Jewish philosopher, jurist, and physician, the foremost intellectual figure of medieval Judaism. His first major work, begun at age 23 and completed 10 years later, was a commentary on the Mishna, the collected Jewish oral laws. A monumental code of Jewish law followed in Hebrew,

  • Abū ʿInān (Marīnid sultan)

    North Africa: Political fragmentation and the triumph of Islamic culture (c. 1250–c. 1500): His son and successor, Abū ʿInān, also invaded the eastern Maghrib, in 1356–57, but he, too, had to withdraw from Tunisia when faced with Arab tribal resistance.

  • Abū ʿĪsā Muḥammad ibn ʿĪsā ibn Sawrah ibn Shaddād al-Tirmidhī (Muslim scholar)

    Al-Tirmidhī, Arab scholar and author of one of the six canonical collections of spoken traditions (Hadith) attributed to the Prophet Muhammad. The life of al-Tirmidhī is poorly documented. He journeyed to Khorāsān, to Iraq, and to the Hejaz in search of material for his collection and studied with

  • Abū ʿIyāḍ (Palestinian political activist)

    Ṣalāḥ Khalaf, Palestinian political activist who was a founding member of the Fatah faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and a close associate of PLO leader Yāsir ʿArafāt. Khalaf’s family fled to the Gaza Strip in 1948 during the conflict that accompanied Israel’s independence. In

  • Abū ʿUbādah al-Walīd ibn ʿUbayd Allāh al-Buḥturī (Arab author)

    Al-Buḥturī, one of the most outstanding poets of the ʿAbbāsid period (750–1258). Al-Buḥturī devoted his early poetry, written between the ages of 16 and 19, to his tribe, the Ṭayyiʾ. Sometime after 840 he came to the attention of the prominent poet Abū Tammām, who encouraged his panegyrics and

  • Abū ʿUbayd al-Bakrī (Islamic geographer)

    Spain: Science: …geographers in Muslim Spain were Abū ʿUbayd al-Bakrī (died 1094), who wrote the Kitāb al-masālik wa’l-mamālik (“Book of Highways and of Kingdoms”), and al-Idrīsī (died 1166), who was in the service of Roger II of Sicily and is the author of the leading universal geography composed by the Arabs. Somewhat…

  • Abū ʿUbaydah (Islamic philologist)

    al-Aʿshā: …is included by the critic Abū ʿUbaydah (d. 825) in the celebrated Muʿallaqāt, a collection of seven pre-Islāmic qaṣīdahs, each of which was considered by its author to be his best; the contents of the collection vary slightly, according to the views of several compilers.

  • Abū ʿUthmān ʿAmr ibn Baḥr al-Jāḥiẓ (Muslim theologian and scholar)

    Al-Jāḥiẓ, Islamic theologian, intellectual, and litterateur known for his individual and masterful Arabic prose. His family, possibly of Ethiopian origin, had only modest standing in Basra, but his intellect and wit gained him acceptance in scholarly circles and in society. During the reign of the

  • Abu, Mount (mountain, India)

    Abu: …situated on the slopes of Mount Abu, an isolated massif in the Aravalli Range.

  • Abu-Ghazala, ʿAbd al-Halim (Egyptian military leader)

    ʿAbd al-Halim Abu Ghazala, Egyptian military leader (born Jan. 15, 1930, Al-Zohour, Egypt—died Sept. 6, 2008, Cairo, Egypt), used his position as Egypt’s field marshal to help preserve the fragile 1979 peace treaty between his country and Israel after the assassination in 1981 of Egyptian Pres.

  • Abu-Jamal, Mumia (American journalist and political activist)

    Mumia Abu-Jamal, American journalist and political activist sentenced to death and then to life in prison for the 1981 murder of a police officer, Daniel Faulkner, in Philadelphia. Wesley Cook established his status as a political activist while still a teenager. At age 14, he took part in a

  • Abū-l-Faẕl ʿAllāmī (Indian author and theologian)

    Abu al-Faḍl ʿAllāmī, historian, military commander, secretary, and theologian to the Mughal emperor Akbar. Abu al-Faḍl ʿAllāmī studied with his father, Sheikh Mubārak Nāgawrī, a distinguished scholar, and, after teaching in his father’s school, was presented to Akbar in 1574 by the poet Fayzī, Abu

  • Abū-ul-Fatḥ Jalāl-ud-Dīn Muḥammad Akbar (Mughal emperor)

    Akbar, the greatest of the Mughal emperors of India. He reigned from 1556 to 1605 and extended Mughal power over most of the Indian subcontinent. In order to preserve the unity of his empire, Akbar adopted programs that won the loyalty of the non-Muslim populations of his realm. He reformed and

  • Abubakar, Abdulsalam (head of state of Nigeria)

    Abdusalam Abubakar, Nigerian military leader, who served as head of state (1998–99). Hailing from the middle belt of the country, Abubakar joined the army in 1975 and received his formal military training in the United States. He commanded Nigeria’s contingent of United Nations peacekeeping troops

  • Abubakar, Abdusalam (head of state of Nigeria)

    Abdusalam Abubakar, Nigerian military leader, who served as head of state (1998–99). Hailing from the middle belt of the country, Abubakar joined the army in 1975 and received his formal military training in the United States. He commanded Nigeria’s contingent of United Nations peacekeeping troops

  • Abubakar, Abdusalami (head of state of Nigeria)

    Abdusalam Abubakar, Nigerian military leader, who served as head of state (1998–99). Hailing from the middle belt of the country, Abubakar joined the army in 1975 and received his formal military training in the United States. He commanded Nigeria’s contingent of United Nations peacekeeping troops

  • Abudefduf saxatilis (fish)

    damselfish: …and the sergeant major (Abudefduf saxatilis), a black-banded, bluish and yellow fish of the tropical Atlantic.

  • Abuja (Nigeria)

    Suleja, town and traditional emirate, Niger state, central Nigeria. The town is situated on the Iku River, a minor tributary of the Niger at the foot of the Abuchi Hills, and lies at the intersection of several roads. The emirate’s wooded savanna area of about 1,150 square miles (2,980 square km)

  • Abuja (national capital, Nigeria)

    Abuja, city, capital of Nigeria. It lies in the central part of Nigeria, in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT; created 1976). The city is approximately 300 miles (480 km) northeast of Lagos, the former capital (until 1991). During the 1980s the new capital city was built and developed on the

  • Abuja (emirate, Nigeria)

    Suleja: The emirate’s wooded savanna area of about 1,150 square miles (2,980 square km) originally included four small Koro chiefdoms that paid tribute to the Hausa kingdom of Zazzau. After warriors of the Fulani jihad (holy war) captured Zaria (Zazzau’s capital, 137 miles [220 km] north-northeast) about…

  • Abuja Federal Capital Territory (administrative territory, Nigeria)

    Federal Capital Territory (FCT), administrative territory, central Nigeria, created in 1976. The territory is located north of the confluence of the Niger and Benue rivers. It is bordered by the states of Niger to the west and northwest, Kaduna to the northeast, Nassarawa to the east and south, and

  • Abuk (Dinka religious figure)

    Abuk, in Dinka religion, the first woman. Abuk is represented as a snake, which is also her favourite animal. The Dinka believe that the Creator made both Abuk and Garang, the first man, out of the rich clay of the Sudan. After making them, the Creator placed Abuk and Garang in a huge pot. When the

  • Abukir Bay (bay, Egypt)

    Abū Qīr Bay, semicircular inlet of the Mediterranean Sea, lying between Abū Qīr Point (southwest) and the mouth of the Rosetta Branch (northeast) of the Nile River delta, in Lower Egypt. The bay was the scene of the Battle of the Nile (1798), in which an English fleet under Rear Admiral Sir Horatio

  • Abukir Bay, Battle of (Egyptian-European history)

    Battle of the Nile, battle that was one of the greatest victories of the British admiral Horatio Nelson. It was fought on August 1, 1798, between the British and French fleets in Abū Qīr Bay, near Alexandria, Egypt. The French Revolutionary general Napoleon Bonaparte in 1798 made plans for an

  • Abukuma Mountains (mountains, Japan)

    Abukuma Mountains, range in northern Honshu, Japan. It extends for 106 miles (170 km) north to south and parallels the Pacific Ocean coast of Fukushima prefecture in the Tōhoku region. Its southern end reaches into northern Ibaraki prefecture in the Kantō region. The mountain range is some 30 miles

  • Abukuma-kōchi (mountains, Japan)

    Abukuma Mountains, range in northern Honshu, Japan. It extends for 106 miles (170 km) north to south and parallels the Pacific Ocean coast of Fukushima prefecture in the Tōhoku region. Its southern end reaches into northern Ibaraki prefecture in the Kantō region. The mountain range is some 30 miles

  • Abukuma-sammyaku (mountains, Japan)

    Abukuma Mountains, range in northern Honshu, Japan. It extends for 106 miles (170 km) north to south and parallels the Pacific Ocean coast of Fukushima prefecture in the Tōhoku region. Its southern end reaches into northern Ibaraki prefecture in the Kantō region. The mountain range is some 30 miles

  • Abul Kasim (Muslim physician and author)

    Abū al-Qāsim, Islām’s greatest medieval surgeon, whose comprehensive medical text, combining Middle Eastern and Greco-Roman classical teachings, shaped European surgical procedures until the Renaissance. Abū al-Qāsim was court physician to the Spanish caliph ʿAbd ar-Raḥmān III an-Nāṣir and wrote

  • Abul Wefa (Persian mathematician)

    Abū al-Wafāʾ, a distinguished Muslim astronomer and mathematician, who made important contributions to the development of trigonometry. Abū al-Wafāʾ worked in a private observatory in Baghdad, where he made observations to determine, among other astronomical parameters, the obliquity of the

  • Abula (Spain)

    Ávila, city, capital of Ávila provincia (province), in the Castile-León comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), central Spain. The city of Ávila is situated on the Adaja River at 3,715 feet (1,132 metres) above sea level and is surrounded by the lofty Sierra de Gredos (south) and the Sierra de

  • Abulafia, Abraham ben Samuel (Jewish Kabbalist)

    Judaism: The making of the Zohar (c. 1260–1492): …was the visionary and adventurer Abraham ben Samuel Abulafia (born 1240), justified itself by appeal to inner “prophetic” experiences encouraged by training methods akin to those of Yoga, Byzantine Hesychasm (mystical, quietist monasticism), and Sufism. Moreover, an important place was given to speculations on the letters and vocalic signs of…

  • Abulfeda (Ayyūbid ruler and author)

    Abū al-Fidāʾ, Ayyūbid dynasty historian and geographer who became a local sultan under the Mamlūk empire. Abū al-Fidāʾ was a descendant of Ayyūb, the father of Saladin, founder of the Ayyūbid dynasty that had been supplanted by the Mamlūks in Egypt and elsewhere before his birth. In 1285 he

  • Abulfedae Annales Moslemici (work by Reiske)

    Johann Jakob Reiske: …literature whose commentary to his Abulfedae Annales Moslemici, 5 vol. (1754; “Abulfeda Muslim Annals”), laid the foundation for Arabic historical scholarship.

  • Abulghazi Bahadur (Khivan khan)

    Abū al-Ghāzī Bahādur, khan (ruler) of Khiva and one of the most prominent historians in Chagatai Turkish literature. The son of ʿArab Muḥammad Khan, Abū al-Ghāzī spent most of his early life in Urgench. When his father died and a dynastic struggle arose among Abū al-Ghāzī and his brothers for the

  • Abumeron (Spanish Muslim physician)

    Ibn Zuhr, one of medieval Islam’s foremost thinkers and the greatest medical clinician of the western caliphate. An intensely practical man, Ibn Zuhr disliked medical speculation; for that reason, he opposed the teachings of the Persian master physician Avicenna. In his Taysīr fī al-mudāwāt wa

  • abuna (Ethiopian religious office)

    Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church: …Ethiopian archbishop, known as the abuna (Arabic: “our father”), who was always an Egyptian Coptic monk; this created a rivalry with the native itshage (abbot general) of the strong Ethiopian monastic community. Attempts to shake Egyptian Coptic control were made from time to time, but it was not until 1929…

  • Abuná River (river, South America)

    Abuná River, a headwater of the Amazon, east of the Cordillera Oriental of the Andes. The navigable river flows for about 200 miles (320 km) northeast through rain forests, forming Bolivia’s northern border with Brazil. It joins the Río Madeira, a tributary of the Amazon, at Manoa, Bolivia. Rubber,

  • Abuná, Río (river, South America)

    Abuná River, a headwater of the Amazon, east of the Cordillera Oriental of the Andes. The navigable river flows for about 200 miles (320 km) northeast through rain forests, forming Bolivia’s northern border with Brazil. It joins the Río Madeira, a tributary of the Amazon, at Manoa, Bolivia. Rubber,

  • Abundance and Unemployment: Our Future

    As described in my book Abundance, I believe that exponential technologies are driving us toward a world of ever-increasing abundance. Within the next 30 years, we will be able to meet and exceed the needs of every man, woman, and child. From there on out, I believe we are heading toward more of a

  • Abundance for What? and Other Essays (work by Riesman)

    David Riesman: …in The Lonely Crowd, and Abundance for What? and Other Essays (1964), a collection of essays elaborating some of those issues, with particular reference to the sociological effects of the Cold War.

  • abundance of the elements (chemistry)

    chemical element: Cosmic abundances of the elements: The relative numbers of atoms of the various elements are usually described as the abundances of the elements. The chief sources of data from which information is gained about present-day abundances of the elements are observations of the chemical composition of…

  • abundance ratio (chemistry)

    isotope: Elemental and isotopic abundances: The composition of any object can be given as a set of elemental and isotopic abundances. One may speak, for example, of the composition of the ocean, the solar system, or indeed the Galaxy in terms of its respective elemental and isotopic abundances.…

  • Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New, The (essays by Dillard)

    Annie Dillard: The Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New was released in 2016.

  • abundant number (mathematical game)

    number game: Perfect numbers and Mersenne numbers: ” In an abundant number, the sum of its proper divisors (i.e., including 1 but excluding the number itself) is greater than the number; in a deficient number, the sum of its proper divisors is less than the number. A perfect number is an integer that equals the…

  • Abung (people)

    Lampong, people indigenous to Lampung province on the Sunda Strait in southern Sumatra, Indonesia. They speak Lampong, a Malayo-Polynesian language that has been written in a script related to the Hindu alphabet. A dependency of the Sultan of Bantam (western Java) after 1550, southern Sumatra

  • aburage-de (ceramic ware)

    Ki Seto ware: …soft dull-glazed pure yellow (ayame-de, or aburage-de), fired at low heat.

  • Aburatsubo Bay (bay, Japan)

    Miura: Jōga Island, in Aburatsubo Bay, is linked to the mainland at Miura by a large bridge. The island and bay, together with Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park and local beaches, help make Miura a popular tourist and recreational centre. The city also serves as a residential suburb for the…

  • abus de droit (French law)

    property law: Nuisance law and continental parallels: …development of the concept of abus de droit (“abuse of right”). The concept has been extensively used in situations where the defendant has employed his land in a given way in order to interfere with his neighbour’s land use. The paradigm case came from Colmar, France, in the middle of…

  • Abuse of Reason (economic project)

    F.A. Hayek: Life and major works: There Hayek worked on his Abuse of Reason project, a wide-ranging critique of an assortment of doctrines that he lumped together under the label of “scientism,” which he defined as “the slavish imitation of the method and language of Science” by social scientists who had appropriated the methods of the…

  • abuse of right (French law)

    property law: Nuisance law and continental parallels: …development of the concept of abus de droit (“abuse of right”). The concept has been extensively used in situations where the defendant has employed his land in a given way in order to interfere with his neighbour’s land use. The paradigm case came from Colmar, France, in the middle of…

  • Abuses Stript and Whipt (work by Wither)

    George Wither: His Abuses Stript and Whipt (1613)—with its satiric treatment of lust, avarice, and pride—gave offense, and he was imprisoned for some months. In prison he wrote The Shepherd’s Hunting (1615), whose five eclogues are among his finest verse, looking back to Spenser in form. Fidelia (1615),…

  • Abusir (archaeological site, Egypt)

    Abū Ṣīr, ancient site between Al-Jīzah (Giza) and Ṣaqqārah, northern Egypt, where three 5th-dynasty (c. 2465–c. 2325 bce) kings (Sahure, Neferirkare, and Neuserre) built their pyramids. The pyramids were poorly constructed (in comparison with Egyptian monuments of similar types) and are now in a

  • Abutilon (plant)

    Abutilon, (genus Abutilon), genus of over 100 species of herbaceous plants and partly woody shrubs of the mallow family (Malvaceae) native to tropical and warm temperate areas. It includes several species used as houseplants and in gardens for their white to deep orange, usually nodding,

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