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  • Anvers (province, Belgium)

    Belgium: Flemish Brabant, Antwerp, and Limburg). Just north of the boundary between Walloon Brabant (Brabant Walloon) and Flemish (Vlaams) Brabant lies the officially bilingual but majority French-speaking Brussels-Capital Region, with approximately one-tenth of the total population. (See also Fleming and Walloon.)

  • anvil (metalworking)

    Anvil, iron block on which metal is placed to be shaped, originally by hand with a hammer. The blacksmith’s anvil is usually of wrought iron, but sometimes of cast iron, with a smooth working surface of hardened steel. A projecting conical beak, or horn, at one end is used for hammering curved

  • anvil (anatomy)

    ear bone: …the malleus, or hammer, the incus, or anvil, and the stapes, or stirrup. Together they form a short chain that crosses the middle ear and transmits vibrations caused by sound waves from the eardrum membrane to the liquid of the inner ear. The malleus resembles a club more than a…

  • Anvil Chorus (work by Verdi)

    Il trovatore: Background and context: Act II features the “Anvil Chorus” (or “Gypsy Chorus”), which has become one of the best-known passages in the operatic repertoire.

  • Anvil City (Alaska, United States)

    Nome, city, western Alaska, U.S. A port on the Bering Sea’s Norton Sound, the city is situated on the southern shore of Seward Peninsula. It is some 540 miles (870 km) northwest of Anchorage and 160 miles (260 km) east of the U.S.-Russian border. Before European contact the area had been inhabited

  • anvil method (Stone Age technique)

    flake tool: …latter method is called the anvil method. The use of a wooden billet or bar permits the removal of longer, thinner, and flatter flakes; and, because wood is resilient, it does not shatter the edge of the flint, and it leaves smaller and flatter bulbs than those obtained by stone…

  • Anvil, Operation (Europe-United States [1944])

    Normandy Invasion: The German counterattack and the Falaise pocket: …landed on the Riviera (Operation Dragoon), Hitler at last recognized the inevitable and gave permission for a withdrawal from Normandy. The only route of escape lay through a gap between the converging American and British spearheads at Falaise. The position was held by the recently arrived Polish 1st Armoured…

  • Anville, Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon d’ (French cartographer)

    Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville, French geographer and cartographer who greatly improved the standards of map-making. From an early age d’Anville continued the reform of French cartography begun by Guillaume Delisle, but he was also a reputable classical scholar, and many of his memoirs and

  • Anwal, Battle of (Spanish-Moroccan history)

    Spain: Opposition movements, 1898–1923: …of Spanish troops at the Battle of Anual (Anwal) in 1921. Opposition politicians were determined to expose the king’s action and criticize the army.

  • Anwar bin Ibrahim (Malaysian politician)

    Anwar Ibrahim, Malaysian politician, reformer, and moderate Islamist. He held many government posts in the late 20th century before being jailed for corruption in 1999. After his release from prison, Anwar played a key role in the redistribution of power within Malaysia’s legislature. However, his

  • Anwar Chairil (Indonesian writer)

    Indonesian literatures: …was the great poet Chairil Anwar, who died in 1949 at age 27. The most prominent writer to emerge at this time was Pramoedya Ananta Toer, whose support for the revolution led to his arrest in 1947 by Dutch colonial authorities. He wrote his first published novel, Perburuan (1950; The…

  • Anwar Ibrahim (Malaysian politician)

    Anwar Ibrahim, Malaysian politician, reformer, and moderate Islamist. He held many government posts in the late 20th century before being jailed for corruption in 1999. After his release from prison, Anwar played a key role in the redistribution of power within Malaysia’s legislature. However, his

  • Anwar Pasha (play by Ebrahim Khan)

    South Asian arts: Bangladesh: …of hope and reawakening, and Anwar Pasha, about the downfall of Anwar (Enver), who could not cope with the new historical forces.

  • Anwar Sadat on international affairs

    Anwar Sadat was the president of Egypt from 1970 until his assassination by Muslim extremists in 1981. In the year before his death, he had a wide-ranging conversation with Frank Gibney, then the vice-chairman of the Britannica Board of Editors. The result was this article, published under Sadat’s

  • Anwar, Tariq (Indian politician)

    Nationalist Congress Party: Tariq Anwar—after they had been expelled from that party for demanding that only a person born in India should be allowed to become the country’s president, vice president, or prime minister. The issue arose after Sonia Gandhi, the Italian-born widow of former prime minister Rajiv…

  • Anwār-e Suhaylī (Persian fables)

    South Asian arts: Mughal style: Akbar period (1556–1605): …animal fables such as the Anwār-e Suhaylī (“Lights of Caropus”), of which several copies were painted, the earliest dated 1570 (School of Oriental and African Studies, London). It was in the illustrations to Persian translations of the Hindu epics, the Mahābhārata and the Rāmāyaṇa, that the Mughal painter revealed to…

  • Anwarul, Haq (Pakistani jurist)

    Haq Anwarul, Pakistani jurist who, as chief justice of the Pakistan Supreme Court, cast the deciding vote upholding former prime minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto’s death sentence for conspiracy to murder (b. May 11, 1917--d. March 3,

  • Anweisung zum seligen Leben, oder auch die Religionslehre, Die (work by Fichte)

    Johann Gottlieb Fichte: Years in Berlin: …oder auch die Religionslehre (1806; The Way Towards the Blessed Life). In this last-named work the union between the finite self-consciousness and the infinite ego, or God, is handled in a deeply religious fashion reminiscent of the Gospel According to John. The knowledge and love of God is declared to…

  • ANWR (Alaska, United States)

    Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, vast natural area occupying the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Alaska. It was established in 1960 as Arctic National Wildlife Range with an area of approximately 13,900 square miles (36,000 square km) and was expanded and renamed Arctic National Wildlife

  • anxiety (psychology)

    Anxiety, a feeling of dread, fear, or apprehension, often with no clear justification. Anxiety is distinguished from fear because the latter arises in response to a clear and actual danger, such as one affecting a person’s physical safety. Anxiety, by contrast, arises in response to apparently

  • anxiety (philosophy)

    Dread, a fundamental category of existentialism. According to the 19th-century philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, dread, or angst, is a desire for what one fears and is central to his conception of original sin. For the 20th-century German philosopher Martin Heidegger, anxiety is one of the

  • anxiety disorder (mental disorder)

    Anxiety disorder, any of several disorders that are characterized by a feeling of fear, dread, or apprehension that arises without a clear or appropriate cause. Anxiety normally is an adaptive mechanism that signals a potentially harmful internal or external change and thereby enables individuals

  • anxiety hysteria (psychology)

    Phobia, an extreme, irrational fear of a specific object or situation. A phobia is classified as a type of anxiety disorder, since anxiety is the chief symptom experienced by the sufferer. Phobias are thought to be learned emotional responses. It is generally held that phobias occur when fear

  • Anxiety of Influence, The (work by Bloom)

    Harold Bloom: …his critical theory, and in The Anxiety of Influence (1973) and A Map of Misreading (1975), he systematized one of his most original theories: that poetry results from poets deliberately misreading the works that influence them. Figures of Capable Imagination (1976) and several other works of the next decade develop…

  • anxiety reaction (mental disorder)

    Anxiety disorder, any of several disorders that are characterized by a feeling of fear, dread, or apprehension that arises without a clear or appropriate cause. Anxiety normally is an adaptive mechanism that signals a potentially harmful internal or external change and thereby enables individuals

  • anxiolytic (pharmacology)

    Antianxiety drug, any drug that relieves symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety is a state of pervasive apprehension that may be triggered by specific environmental or personal factors. Anxiety states are generally combined with emotions such as fear, anger, or depression. A person with anxiety may complain

  • Anxious Bench, The (work by Nevin)

    John Williamson Nevin: In 1843 Nevin published The Anxious Bench, an influential criticism of the revivalism and disregard for confessional traditions of such evangelists as Charles Grandison Finney. Nevin argued for the importance of church life and the sacramental side of Christianity, particularly for the importance of the Roman Catholic doctrines of…

  • Any Given Sunday (film by Stone [1999])

    Oliver Stone: …motifs, power and violence, in Any Given Sunday (1999), about professional football, and in Alexander (2004), a poorly received biography of Alexander the Great. World Trade Center (2006), a retelling of the events of September 11, 2001, from the viewpoint of two police officers, returned Stone to the centre of…

  • Any Wednesday (work by Resnick)

    Gene Hackman: …young suitor in Muriel Resnick’s Any Wednesday. His performance attracted the attention of Hollywood agents, and Hackman was subsequently cast in the film Lilith (1964), which starred Warren Beatty.

  • Any Woman Can’t (work by Wasserstein)

    Wendy Wasserstein: Wasserstein’s first play, Any Woman Can’t (1973), is a cutting farce on one of her major themes—a woman’s attempts to succeed in an environment traditionally dominated by men. Two other early works are Uncommon Women and Others (1975; revised and expanded, 1977) and Isn’t It Romantic (1981), which…

  • Anya Nya (Sudanese guerrilla organization)

    South Sudan: The 1972 Addis Ababa Agreement: …the fighting units of the Anya Nya and its political wing, the Southern Sudan Liberation Movement (SSLM). Thereafter—throughout 1971—the SSLM, representing General Lagu, maintained a dialogue with the Sudanese government over proposals for regional autonomy and the ending of hostilities. Those talks culminated in the signing of the Addis Ababa…

  • Anyang (South Korea)

    Anyang, city, Kyŏnggi (Gyeonggi) do (province), northwestern South Korea, situated about 20 miles (30 km) southwest of Seoul. It was given the status of a municipality in 1973 and has become the largest industrial satellite of Seoul. Industries include brewing and the manufacture of textiles,

  • Anyang (China)

    Anyang, city, northern Henan sheng (province), northeast-central China, on the Anyang River, a tributary of the Wei River. It was important in history as the site of the ancient city of Yin, the capital of the Shang dynasty (1600–1046 bce) from the 14th century bce; the Shang palace stood about 10

  • Anyang Art Park (park, Anyang, South Korea)

    Anyang: All three are contained within Anyang Art Park, a former amusement park rededicated to public art, local cultural treasures, and nature trails. Pop. (2010) 602,122.

  • Anyathian complex (prehistoric technology)

    Myanmar: The origins of civilization in Myanmar: …tools that have been labeled Anyathian, from Anyatha (another term for Upper Burma). A discovery in 1969, by workers from the government’s Department of Archaeology, of some cave paintings and stone tools in the eastern part of Shan state shows that that area too had Paleolithic as well as early…

  • Anyi (people)

    Anyi, African people who inhabit the tropical forest of eastern Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana and speak a language of the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo language family. About the middle of the 18th century most of the Anyi were expelled from Ghana by the Asante and migrated westward. The Anyi, who live

  • Anykysciu silelis (poem by Baranauskas)

    Antanas Baranauskas: …literature, Anykyščių šilelis (1858–59; The Forest of Anykščiai). The 342-line poem, written in East High Lithuanian dialect, describes the former beauty of a pine grove near his village and its despoliation under the Russians (“Hills with tree-stumps, bare slopes! Who would believe in your former beauty?”); it depicted in symbolic…

  • Anyte (Greek poet)

    Anyte, Greek poet of the Peloponnesus who was so highly esteemed in antiquity that in the well-known Stephanos (“Garland”), a collection compiled by Meleager (early 1st century), the “lilies of Anyte” are the first poems to be entwined in the “wreath of poets.” Anyte’s fame persisted, and Antipater

  • Anything Goes (film by Milestone [1936])

    Lewis Milestone: Films of the 1930s: Milestone had more success with Anything Goes (1936), a very loose adaptation of a Broadway play featuring music by Cole Porter; it starred Bing Crosby, Ethel Merman, and Ida Lupino. The General Died at Dawn was one of 1936’s best pictures, an entertaining thriller set in turbulent China, with Gary…

  • Anything Goes (musical by Porter)

    Ethel Merman: …screen (1936) versions of Porter’s Anything Goes. She gave several other memorable performances in such shows as Red, Hot and Blue! (1936), Du Barry Was a Lady (1939), Panama Hattie (1940), Something for the Boys (1943), and Annie Get Your Gun (1946), which was her biggest success. She appeared also…

  • Anytus (Athenian politician)

    Socrates: The perceived fragility of Athenian democracy: …Socrates and spoke against him—Anytus—was a prominent democratic leader makes it all the more likely that worries about the future of Athenian democracy lay behind Socrates’ trial. And even if neither Anytus nor the other prosecutors (Meletus and Lycon) harboured such fears, it is hard to believe that they…

  • Anywa (people)

    Anywa, a Luo-speaking riverine people, two-thirds of whom live in eastern South Sudan and the remainder in Ethiopia. The Anywa are believed to have migrated from lands east of the African Great Lakes several centuries ago. They number about 100,000, and their language is classified as Nilo-Saharan.

  • Anywak (people)

    Anywa, a Luo-speaking riverine people, two-thirds of whom live in eastern South Sudan and the remainder in Ethiopia. The Anywa are believed to have migrated from lands east of the African Great Lakes several centuries ago. They number about 100,000, and their language is classified as Nilo-Saharan.

  • Anywhere but Here (film by Wang [1999])

    Natalie Portman: …Sarandon’s flamboyant single mother in Anywhere but Here (1999) and as a homeless and pregnant teen who gives birth in a Wal-Mart store in Where the Heart Is (2000). In addition to acting, Portman attended Harvard University, graduating in 2003 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. In 2004 she won…

  • Anywhere I Lay My Head (album by Johansson)

    TV on the Radio: Sitek also produced Scarlett Johansson’s Anywhere I Lay My Head (2008), which featured the actress’s interpretation of Tom Waits songs. Malone released a solo album titled Rain Machine in 2009, and the following year Sitek’s pop group Maximum Balloon released its debut LP. The group returned to the studio for…

  • ANZ Bank New Zealand Ltd. (New Zealand company)

    John Key: Prime ministership: …2018 Key became chairman of ANZ Bank New Zealand Ltd.

  • Anza-Borrego Desert State Park (park, California, United States)

    Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, large desert recreational area in southern California, U.S., lying east of San Diego, south of Palm Springs, and west of the Salton Sea. Encompassing more than 935 square miles (2,420 square km) of the Colorado Desert, it is the largest state park in the 48

  • ANZAC (military corps)

    ANZAC, combined corps that served with distinction in World War I during the ill-fated 1915 Gallipoli Campaign, an attempt to capture the Dardanelles from Turkey. In 1916 Australian and New Zealand infantry divisions were sent to France. They took part in some of the bloodiest actions of the war

  • Anzac Cove (region, Turkey)

    World War I: Rival strategies and the Dardanelles campaign, 1915–16: …won a bridgehead at “Anzac Cove,” north of Kaba Tepe, on the Aegean side of the peninsula, with some 20,000 men landing in the first two days. The British, meanwhile, tried to land at five points around Cape Helles but established footholds only at three of them and then…

  • Anzac Day (holiday)

    ANZAC Day, in Australia and New Zealand, holiday (April 25) that commemorates the landing in 1915, during World War I, of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) on the Gallipoli Peninsula. The Allies attempted to take control of the strategic Dardanelles from Turkey, allied with the

  • Anzac Muster (short stories by Baylebridge)

    William Baylebridge: …War I were collected in Anzac Muster (1921).

  • Anzalī, Bandar-e (Iran)

    Bandar-e Anzalī, principal port and resort, northern Iran, on the Caspian Sea, connected with Māzandarān, Azerbaijan, and Tehrān by road. The population includes Russians, Armenians, Caucasians, and Turkmens. Founded in the early 19th century, the town lies on both sides of the entrance to Mordāb

  • Anzan (ancient territory, Iran)

    Anshan, city and territory of ancient Elam, north of modern Shīrāz, southwestern Iran. The city’s ruins, covering 350 acres, have yielded major archaeological finds, including examples of early Elamite writing. Anshan came to prominence about 2350 bc as an enemy of the Mesopotamian dynasty of A

  • Anzanite dynasty (Persian history)

    ancient Iran: The Middle Elamite period: …rise to power of the Anzanite dynasty, whose homeland probably lay in the mountains northeast of modern Khūzestān. Political expansion under Khumbannumena (c. 1285–c. 1266 bc), the fourth king of this line, proceeded apace, and his successes were commemorated by his assumption of the title “Expander of the Empire.” He…

  • Anzengruber, Ludwig (Austrian author)

    Ludwig Anzengruber, Austrian playwright and novelist who won acclaim for his realistic plays of peasant life. After working for a time as an actor, Anzengruber published an anti-clerical drama, Der Pfarrer von Kirchfeld (1870; “The Pastor of Kirchfeld”), which was a great success. Except for the

  • Anzhero-Sudzhensk (Russia)

    Anzhero-Sudzhensk, city, Kemerovo oblast (province), Russia, on the Trans-Siberian Railroad at the northern limit of the Kuznetsk Coal Basin. Coal mining, begun early in the 20th century, expanded rapidly after 1928, when the townships of Anzherka and Sudzhenka were amalgamated, to be given city

  • Anziku, Kingdom of (historical kingdom, Africa)

    Kingdom of Anziku, historic African state on and north of the Congo River in the vicinity of Malebo Pool. The Teke people lived on the plateaus of the region from early times. It is not known when they organized as a kingdom, but by 1600 their state was a rival of the Kongo kingdom south of the

  • Anzilotti, Dionisio (Italian law scholar)

    Dionisio Anzilotti, Italian jurist who was one of the main founders of the so-called positive school of international law, a legal philosophy advocating a sharp distinction between the legal and the political and moral aspects of international relations. In 1906 Anzilotti was cofounder of the

  • Anzio (Italy)

    Anzio, town, Roma province, Lazio (Latium) region, Italy, located on a peninsula jutting into the Tyrrhenian Sea. The town is of uncertain origin; according to legend, it was founded by Anteias, son of the Greek chieftain Odysseus, and the enchantress Circe. It was a stronghold of the Volsci, an

  • Anzio, Battle of (World War II)

    Battle of Anzio, (22 January–5 June 1944), World War II event on the coast of Italy, south of Rome. Intended as a daring outflanking move that would open up the way to the capture of Rome, the Anzio landings degenerated into World War II deadlock: the Allies unable to drive forward from their

  • Anzoátegui (state, Venezuela)

    Anzoátegui, estado (state), northeastern Venezuela. It is bounded to the north by the Caribbean Sea and Sucre state, to the east by Monagas state, to the south by the Orinoco River, to the west by Guárico state, and to the northwest by Miranda state. Most of Anzoátegui’s area lies in the Llanos

  • Anzúrez, Pedro de (Spanish conquistador)

    Sucre: …in 1539 by the conquistador Pedro de Anzúrez on the site of a Charcas Indian village and has been variously called La Plata (the Spanish colonial name), Charcas, and Chuquisaca (the former indigenous name for the site, probably meaning “headquarters of the Charcas”). Many colonial churches survive, including the 17th-century…

  • ANZUS Pact

    ANZUS Pact, security treaty between Australia, New Zealand, and the United States that was signed in San Francisco, Calif., on Sept. 1, 1951, for the purpose of providing mutual aid in the event of aggression and for settling disputes by peaceful means. It came into force in 1952. The three

  • ANZUS Treaty

    ANZUS Pact, security treaty between Australia, New Zealand, and the United States that was signed in San Francisco, Calif., on Sept. 1, 1951, for the purpose of providing mutual aid in the event of aggression and for settling disputes by peaceful means. It came into force in 1952. The three

  • Ao (people)

    Nagaland: Cultural life: …democratic structures of the Angamis, Aos, Lothas, and Rengmas. A prominent village institution is the morung (a communal house or dormitory for young unmarried men), where skulls and other trophies of war formerly were hung. The pillars are still carved with striking representations of tigers, hornbills, and human and other…

  • AO (climatology)

    sea ice: Pack ice drift and thickness: …centre is known as the Arctic Oscillation.

  • Ao (ancient city, China)

    Zhengzhou: …with the Shang capital of Ao. The Shang, who continually moved their capital, left Ao, perhaps in the 13th century bce. The site, nevertheless, remained occupied; Zhou (post-1050 bce) tombs have also been discovered. Traditionally it is held that in the Western Zhou period (1111–771 bce) it became the fief…

  • ao dai (clothing)

    Vietnam: Daily life and social customs: …a form of the traditional ao dai, a long, slit tunic worn over pants.

  • Ao-men (administrative region, China)

    Macau, special administrative region (Pinyin: tebie xingzhengqu; Wade-Giles romanization: t’e-pieh hsing-cheng-ch’ü) of China, on the country’s southern coast. Macau is located on the southwestern corner of the Pearl (Zhu) River (Chu Chiang) estuary (at the head of which is the port of Guangzhou

  • AOA (medical organization)

    osteopathy: …institutions are accredited by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and most are members of the American Osteopathic Hospital Association.

  • Aoba (island, Vanuatu)

    Aoba, volcanic island of Vanuatu, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, 30 miles (50 km) east of Espiritu Santo. With an area of 154 square miles (399 square km), the island is dominated by Manaro, a 4,907-foot (1,496-metre) volcanic peak with three lakes in its caldera. Aoba’s landscape inspired

  • Aod (biblical figure)

    Ehud, in the Old Testament (Judges 3:12–4:1), son of Gera, the Benjaminite, Israelite hero who delivered Israel from 18 years of oppression by the Moabites. A left-handed man, Ehud tricked Eglon, king of Moab, and killed him. He then led the tribe of Ephraim to seize the fords of the Jordan, w

  • AOD (metallurgy)

    stainless steel: In the argon-oxygen decarburization process, a mixture of oxygen and argon gas is injected into the liquid steel. By varying the ratio of oxygen and argon, it is possible to remove carbon to controlled levels by oxidizing it to carbon monoxide without also oxidizing and losing expensive…

  • AOF (historical territory, West Africa)

    French West Africa, administrative grouping under French rule from 1895 until 1958 of the former French territories of West Africa: Senegal, French Guinea, the Ivory Coast, and the French Sudan, to which Dahomey was added in 1899. Certain territories of the Sudan were grouped together under the

  • aogai (decorative art)

    Laque burgauté, in the decorative arts, East Asian technique of decorating lacquer ware with inlaid designs employing shaped pieces of the iridescent blue-green shell of the sea-ear (Haliotis). This shell inlay is sometimes engraved and occasionally combined with gold and silver. Workmanship is e

  • Aoibhinn, An Craoibhín (president of Ireland)

    Douglas Hyde, distinguished Gaelic scholar and writer and first president of the Republic of Ireland (Éire). He was the outstanding figure in the struggle for the preservation and extension of the Irish language from 1893, when he founded the Gaelic League (a nationalistic organization of Roman

  • aoidoi (Greek bards)

    epic: Uses of the epic: …Homer, the activity of the aoidoi, who sang their own epic songs at the courts of the nobility, slowly declined. During the first half of the 7th century, the aoidoi produced such new poems as those of Hesiod and some of the earlier poems of what was to become known…

  • aoidos (Greek bards)

    epic: Uses of the epic: …Homer, the activity of the aoidoi, who sang their own epic songs at the courts of the nobility, slowly declined. During the first half of the 7th century, the aoidoi produced such new poems as those of Hesiod and some of the earlier poems of what was to become known…

  • Aoki, Hiroaki (Japanese-born restaurateur and adventurer)

    Rocky Aoki, (Hiroaki Aoki), Japanese-born restaurateur and adventurer (born Oct. 9, 1938, Tokyo, Japan—died July 10, 2008, New York, N.Y.), founded the Benihana of Tokyo chain of steak houses and thereby introduced Americans to “dinner as theatre” with a style of Japanese cooking known as

  • Aoki, Rocky (Japanese-born restaurateur and adventurer)

    Rocky Aoki, (Hiroaki Aoki), Japanese-born restaurateur and adventurer (born Oct. 9, 1938, Tokyo, Japan—died July 10, 2008, New York, N.Y.), founded the Benihana of Tokyo chain of steak houses and thereby introduced Americans to “dinner as theatre” with a style of Japanese cooking known as

  • Aoko, Gaundencia (Kenyan religious leader)

    Legio Maria: …a catechist (religious teacher), and Gaundencia Aoko. Both claimed to have undergone prophetic experiences that invested them with divine authority and directed them to reject traditional magic and divine healers. Excommunicated for this, Ondeto and Aoko formed a new all-African church that offered free healing by prayer and the exorcism…

  • AOL (American company)

    AOL, one of the largest Internet-access subscription service companies in the United States, providing a range of Web services for users. AOL was one of the first companies to establish a strong sense of community among its users through buddy lists and instant messaging services, which transmit

  • AOL Time Warner Inc. (American corporation)

    Richard Parsons: …who was CEO (2002–07) of AOL Time Warner (now WarnerMedia) and later chairman (2009–12) of Citigroup.

  • Aomen (administrative region, China)

    Macau, special administrative region (Pinyin: tebie xingzhengqu; Wade-Giles romanization: t’e-pieh hsing-cheng-ch’ü) of China, on the country’s southern coast. Macau is located on the southwestern corner of the Pearl (Zhu) River (Chu Chiang) estuary (at the head of which is the port of Guangzhou

  • Aomori (Japan)

    Aomori, city and capital of Aomori ken (prefecture), northern Honshu, Japan. It is located on Aomori Bay, near the northern limit of the Tōhoku region. One of Japan’s most important transportation centres, Aomori is the terminus of the main northern Honshu rail lines—including the Tōhoku branch of

  • Aomori (prefecture, Japan)

    Aomori, northernmost ken (prefecture) on the island of Honshu, Japan. It is bordered by the Pacific Ocean (east), the Tsugaru Strait (north), and the Sea of Japan (East Sea; west). The peninsulas of Tsugaru and Shimokita enclose Mutsu Bay. The prefectural capital, Aomori city, is at the head of the

  • Aon Center (building, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Aon Center, 83-floor (1,136 feet, or 346.3 metres, tall) commercial skyscraper located at 200 E. Randolph Street in downtown Chicago’s East Loop area. Completed in 1972, the simple, rectangular-shaped, tubular steel-framed structure was originally called the Standard Oil Building because it housed

  • Aoneko (work by Hagiwara)

    Hagiwara Sakutarō: In his second poetry collection, Aoneko (1923; “Blue Cat”), Hagiwara presented himself as a cheerless and tormented man thirsting for affection. These two collections established his reputation as a poet. His difficult style was not immediately understood, although one of the leaders of the Japanese literary world, the novelist Mori…

  • Aontroim (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Antrim, town and former district (1973–2015) within the former County Antrim, now in Antrim and Newtownabbey district, eastern Northern Ireland. Antrim town is located in the valley of the Six Mile Water stream, at the northeastern corner of Lough (lake) Neagh. In 1798 the town was the scene of a

  • Aonyx (mammal)

    mustelid: Natural history: Clawless otters (genus Aonyx) specialize on crustaceans (especially crabs) and mollusks, whereas other otters (genus Lutra) are primarily fish eaters. Specialization even occurs between sexes in the weasels (genus Mustela), in which males consume larger prey than females owing to their larger size.

  • Aonyx capensis (mammal)

    otter: Freshwater otters: African clawless otters (Aonyx capensis) and Congo clawless otters (A. congicus or A. capensis congicus) occupy murky waterways and thus rely more on manual dexterity than on vision to obtain food (mostly crabs) from under rocks. Their front feet are handlike and partially webbed.

  • Aonyx capensis congicus (mammal)

    otter: Freshwater otters: …clawless otters (Aonyx capensis) and Congo clawless otters (A. congicus or A. capensis congicus) occupy murky waterways and thus rely more on manual dexterity than on vision to obtain food (mostly crabs) from under rocks. Their front feet are handlike and partially webbed.

  • Aonyx congicus (mammal)

    otter: Freshwater otters: …clawless otters (Aonyx capensis) and Congo clawless otters (A. congicus or A. capensis congicus) occupy murky waterways and thus rely more on manual dexterity than on vision to obtain food (mostly crabs) from under rocks. Their front feet are handlike and partially webbed.

  • Aoraki (mountain, New Zealand)

    Mount Cook, mountain, the highest in New Zealand, located in the Southern Alps, west-central South Island. Surrounded by 22 peaks exceeding elevations of 10,000 feet (3,000 metres), the permanently snow-clad mountain rises to 12,316 feet (3,754 metres); a landslide in 1991 decreased the height of

  • Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park (national park, New Zealand)

    Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, park, west-central South Island, New Zealand. Established in 1953, it has an area of 273 square miles (707 square km) and has a common western boundary with Westland National Park. The park extends for about 40 miles (65 km) along the crest of the Southern Alps. At

  • Aôral, Mount (mountain, Cambodia)

    Cambodia: Relief: …remote and largely uninhabited area, Mount Aôral, Cambodia’s highest peak, rises to an elevation of 5,949 feet (1,813 metres). The southern coastal region adjoining the Gulf of Thailand is a narrow lowland strip, heavily wooded and sparsely populated, which is isolated from the central plain by the southwestern highlands.

  • Aorangi (mountain, New Zealand)

    Mount Cook, mountain, the highest in New Zealand, located in the Southern Alps, west-central South Island. Surrounded by 22 peaks exceeding elevations of 10,000 feet (3,000 metres), the permanently snow-clad mountain rises to 12,316 feet (3,754 metres); a landslide in 1991 decreased the height of

  • Aornos (lake, Italy)

    Lake of Averno, crater lake in Napoli province, Campania region, southern Italy, in the Campi Flegrei volcanic region, west of Naples. It is 7 ft (2 m) above sea level, 118 ft deep, and nearly 2 mi (more than 3 km) in circumference, with no natural outlet. Its Greek name, Aornos, was interpreted as

  • Aornos, Siege of (ancient Macedonian history)

    Siege of Aornos, (327 bc), conflict in which Alexander the Great seized a nearly impregnable natural stronghold blocking his route to India. Aornos is evidently modern Pīr Sarāi, a steep ridge a few miles west of the Indus and north of the Buner rivers in modern Pakistan. Unable to storm the rock,

  • aorta (anatomy)

    Aorta, in vertebrates and some invertebrates, the blood vessel (or vessels) carrying blood from the heart to all the organs and other structures of the body. At the opening from the left ventricle into the aorta is a three-part valve that prevents backflow of blood from the aorta into the heart.

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