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  • Annual, Battle of (Spanish-Moroccan history)

    Spain: Opposition movements, 1898–1923: …of Spanish troops at the Battle of Anual (Anwal) in 1921. Opposition politicians were determined to expose the king’s action and criticize the army.

  • annual-plan control (business)

    marketing: Marketing control: …which has a different purpose: annual-plan control, profitability control, efficiency control, and strategic control.

  • Annuario Pontificio (Roman Catholicism)

    pope: The Annuario Pontificio, the official directory of the Holy See, describes the office of the pope by the following titles: Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Patriarch of the West, Primate of…

  • annuity (finance)

    Annuity, in the most literal sense, a payment made yearly, as, for example, under a contract to provide retirement income. The term is also applied to any series of periodic payments made at regular, fixed intervals; the length of the interval is called the annuity period. There are two main

  • annuity certain

    annuity: Under an annuity certain, the payments are to continue for a specified number of payments, and calculations are based on the assumption that each payment is certain to be made when due. With a contingent annuity, each payment is contingent on the continuance of a given status,…

  • annuity depreciation

    depreciation: fixed-percentage, and, more rarely, annuity methods of depreciation (giving, respectively, constant, gradually decreasing, and gradually increasing charges) are standard. Sometimes charges vary with use (e.g., with the number of miles per year a truck is driven). Special rules allow depletion of nonreproducible capital (such as a body of ore…

  • annular eclipse (astronomy)

    Moon: Principal characteristics of the Earth-Moon system: …Sun; the resulting eclipse is annular, and observers can see a thin ring of the solar disk around the Moon’s silhouette.

  • annular strip (geometry)

    differential geometry: …be formed by cutting an annular strip (the region between two concentric circles) from a flat sheet of steel and then bending it into a helix that spirals around the cylinder, as illustrated in the figure. What should the radius r of the annulus be to produce the best fit?…

  • annulated sea snake (reptile)

    sea snake: …a 2019 study of the blue-banded sea snake (or annulated sea snake, Hydrophis cyanocinctus) found a highly vascularized area between the snout and the top of the head, which allows oxygen to be transported directly from the water to the snake’s brain. Sea snakes give birth in the ocean to…

  • annulation (zoology)

    segmentation: …groups, external ringlike formations, called annulations, occur in the covering tissues, sometimes so marked as to suggest segmentations; these formations prove to be only superficial, however, and are not indicative of true segmentation.

  • annulene (chemical compound)

    hydrocarbon: Annulenes and the Hückel rule: Insight into the requirements for aromaticity were provided by German physicist Erich Hückel in 1931. Limiting his analysis to planar, monocyclic, completely conjugated polyenes, Hückel calculated that compounds of this type are aromatic if they contain 4n + 2 π…

  • annulment (law)

    Annulment, legal invalidation of a marriage. Annulment announces the invalidity of a marriage that was void from its inception. It is to be distinguished from dissolution, which ends a valid marriage for special reasons—e.g., insanity of one partner after marrying. The annulment decree attempts to

  • annulo-spiral sensory ending (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Muscle spindles: …to be of three kinds: primary sensory endings, secondary sensory endings, and plate motor endings. There are approximately equal numbers of primary and secondary sensory endings, so they may be considered equally important. However, the primary, or annulo-spiral, ending has traditionally attracted the most attention, largely through its prominent appearance…

  • annulus (caecilian body structure)

    Gymnophiona: Form and function: Annuli (primary grooves) in the skin encircle the body and form segments; in some taxonomic groups, secondary and tertiary grooves partially circumscribe the body. Within the tissue of the annuli, bony scales of dermal origin usually occur. The heads of caecilians are blunt, and their…

  • annulus (plant anatomy)

    fern: The sporangium: …display more or less specialized bows, or annuli, usually consisting of a single row of differentially thickened cells. Apparently, the mechanical force for opening and for throwing the spores derives entirely from these annular cells; all the other capsule cells are thin-walled and unmodified. The stresses imposed by the drying…

  • annulus (dinoflagellate body structure)

    dinoflagellate: …median or coiled groove, the annulus, which contains a flagellum. A longitudinal groove, the sulcus, extends from the annulus posteriorly to the point at which a second flagellum is attached. The nuclei of dinoflagellates are larger than those of other eukaryotes. So-called armoured dinoflagellates are covered with cellulose plates, which…

  • Annunciata dei Catalani (church, Messina, Italy)

    Messina: …cathedral and the Church of Annunciata dei Catalani, possibly of Byzantine origin, both rebuilt by the Normans in the 12th century. The National Museum houses works of art saved from the 1908 earthquake. Among numerous noteworthy modern buildings is the campanile adjacent to the cathedral. Messina has a university founded…

  • Annunciation (Christianity)

    Annunciation, in Christianity, the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive a son by the power of the Holy Spirit to be called Jesus (Luke 1:26–38). The angel’s pronouncement is met with Mary’s willing consent (“Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with

  • Annunciation (painting by Lorenzetti)

    Ambrogio Lorenzetti: …Temple (1342) and of the Annunciation (1344).

  • Annunciation of the Lord (Christianity)

    Annunciation, in Christianity, the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive a son by the power of the Holy Spirit to be called Jesus (Luke 1:26–38). The angel’s pronouncement is met with Mary’s willing consent (“Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with

  • Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Christianity)

    Annunciation, in Christianity, the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive a son by the power of the Holy Spirit to be called Jesus (Luke 1:26–38). The angel’s pronouncement is met with Mary’s willing consent (“Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with

  • Annunciation Triptych (work by Campin)

    Robert Campin: …of his masterpieces is the Mérode Altarpiece (c. 1428), a triptych of the Annunciation with the donors and St. Joseph on the wings. The Virgin is portrayed in a setting of bourgeois realism in which interior furnishings are rendered with the frank and loving attention to detail that was to…

  • Annunciation, Cathedral of the (cathedral, Moscow, Russia)

    Moscow: The Kremlin: Across the square is the Cathedral of the Annunciation, built in 1484–89 by craftsmen from Pskov (though burned in 1547, it was rebuilt in 1562–64). Its cluster of chapels is topped by golden roofs and domes. Inside are a number of early 15th-century icons attributed to Theophanes the Greek and…

  • Annunciation, Church of the (church, Nazareth, Israel)

    Nazareth: Of these, the Roman Catholic Church of the Annunciation (completed 1966, on the site of a previous church of 1730 and a crusader foundation) is perhaps the best known. In it is the Grotto of the Annunciation, where, according to the New Testament, the archangel Gabriel appeared to the Virgin…

  • Annunciation, Feast of the (Christianity)

    Annunciation: The Feast of the Annunciation, one of the principal feasts of the Christian church, is celebrated on March 25 (Lady Day), nine months before Christmas. The first authentic allusions to the feast (apart from the Gelasian and Gregorian sacramentaries, in both of which it is mentioned)…

  • Annunciation, Grotto of the (grotto, Nazareth, Israel)

    Nazareth: In it is the Grotto of the Annunciation, where, according to the New Testament, the archangel Gabriel appeared to the Virgin Mary and announced that she was to be the mother of Jesus (Luke 1:26–31). The grotto has part of a mosaic floor dating back to the 5th–6th century.…

  • Annunciation, The (painting by Domenico)

    Domenico Veneziano: The Annunciation is the most successful of Domenico’s experiments in rendering outdoor light: the pale morning light fills and defines the space of the courtyard, and the cool light on the broad plane of white wall heightens the sense of moment and loneliness in the two…

  • Annunciation, The (painting by Angelico)

    Fra Angelico: San Domenico period: …Madonna of the Star and The Annunciation.

  • Annunciation, The (painting by Martini)

    Simone Martini: On the other hand, the Annunciation triptych, painted for the Siena Cathedral (but now in the Uffizi, Florence), is deliberately unreal. Simone signed this work in 1333 with his brother-in-law, the Sienese painter Lippo Memmi, an associate for many years. The exquisite rhythm of the lines and dematerialized forms of…

  • Annunzio, Gabriele D’ (Italian writer and political leader)

    Gabriele D’Annunzio, Italian poet, novelist, dramatist, short-story writer, journalist, military hero, and political leader, the leading writer of Italy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The son of a politically prominent and wealthy Pescara landowner, D’Annunzio was educated at the

  • Annuoual, Battle of (Spanish-Moroccan history)

    Spain: Opposition movements, 1898–1923: …of Spanish troops at the Battle of Anual (Anwal) in 1921. Opposition politicians were determined to expose the king’s action and criticize the army.

  • Annus Mirabilis (poem by Dryden)

    John Dryden: Youth and education: Dryden’s longest poem to date, Annus Mirabilis (1667), was a celebration of two victories by the English fleet over the Dutch and the Londoners’ survival of the Great Fire of 1666. In this work Dryden was once again gilding the royal image and reinforcing the concept of a loyal nation…

  • ANO (political party, Czech Republic)

    Czech Republic: History: Action for Alienated Citizens (popularly known by its Czech acronym, ANO, which means “yes”), a protest party founded in 2011 by billionaire media mogul Andrej Babiš, finished a strong second with almost 19 percent, followed by the Communists with 15 percent. The scandal-plagued Civic Democrats…

  • ANO (Palestinian organization)

    Abū Niḍāl: …more commonly known as the Abū Niḍāl Organization (ANO), or Abū Niḍāl Group, a Palestinian organization that engaged in numerous acts of terrorism beginning in the mid-1970s.

  • Año bisiesto (film by Rowe [2010])

    Amy Adams: …appeared in the romantic comedy Leap Year (2010) and in The Fighter (2010), a drama in which she played against type as the street-smart girlfriend of an up-and-coming boxer. For the latter role, she received her third Academy Award nomination. In 2011 Adams acted alongside Kermit the Frog and Miss…

  • ano da morte de Ricardo Reis, O (work by Saramago)

    José Saramago: …morte de Ricardo Reis (1984; The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis), juxtaposes the romantic involvements of its narrator, a poet-physician who returns to Portugal at the start of the Salazar dictatorship, with long dialogues that examine human nature as revealed in Portuguese history and culture.

  • Áno Ólimbos (mountain, Greece)

    Mount Olympus, mountain peak, the highest (9,570 feet [2,917 m]) in Greece. It is part of the Olympus massif near the Gulf of Thérmai (Modern Greek: Thermaïkós) of the Aegean Sea and lies astride the border between Macedonia (Makedonía) and Thessaly (Thessalía). It is also designated as Upper

  • Áno Ólympos (mountain, Greece)

    Mount Olympus, mountain peak, the highest (9,570 feet [2,917 m]) in Greece. It is part of the Olympus massif near the Gulf of Thérmai (Modern Greek: Thermaïkós) of the Aegean Sea and lies astride the border between Macedonia (Makedonía) and Thessaly (Thessalía). It is also designated as Upper

  • anoa (buffalo)

    Southeast Asia: Animal life: …Javan rhinoceros, the orangutan, the anoa (a dwarf buffalo), the babirusa (a wild swine), and the palm civet.

  • Anoa depressicornis (buffalo)

    Southeast Asia: Animal life: …Javan rhinoceros, the orangutan, the anoa (a dwarf buffalo), the babirusa (a wild swine), and the palm civet.

  • Anoa mindorensis (mammal)

    Tamarau, (species Anoa mindorensis), small species of buffalo

  • anobiid (insect)

    Borer beetle, any of a number of species of insects that are included in the family Anobiidae (order Coleoptera). These beetles tend to be small (1 to 9 mm, or less than 0.5 inch) and cylindrical. When disturbed, they usually pull in their legs and play dead. The best-known borers are the cigarette

  • Anobiidae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Anobiidae (drugstore and deathwatch beetles) Live in dry vegetable materials; some species destructive pests; examples Xestobium, Stegobium, Lasioderma; about 1,100 widely distributed species. Family Bostrichidae (branch and twig borers, bostrichid beetles, horned powderpost beetles)

  • Anobium punctatum (insect)

    art conservation and restoration: Techniques of building conservation: Wood-boring insects include the furniture and deathwatch beetles. From eggs laid in cracks, the larvae tunnel into timber and damage it before emerging as beetles to lay more eggs. The deathwatch beetle inhabits mostly the outer sapwood of oak, when wet or softened by rot. The furniture beetle lives…

  • anode (electronics)

    Anode, the terminal or electrode from which electrons leave a system. In a battery or other source of direct current the anode is the negative terminal, but in a passive load it is the positive terminal. For example, in an electron tube electrons from the cathode travel across the tube toward the

  • anode ray (physics)

    Eugen Goldstein: …what he termed Kanalstrahlen, or canal rays, also called positive rays; these are positively charged ions that are accelerated toward and through a perforated cathode in an evacuated tube. He also contributed greatly to the study of cathode rays; in 1876 he showed that these rays could cast sharp shadows,…

  • anodic aluminum oxide (chemical compound)

    aluminum: Compounds: Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), typically produced via the electrochemical oxidation of aluminum, is a nanostructured aluminum-based material with a very unique structure. AAO contains cylindrical pores that provide for a variety of uses. It is a thermally and mechanically stable compound while also being optically…

  • anodizing (metallurgy)

    Anodizing, method of plating metal for such purposes as corrosion resistance, electrical insulation, thermal control, abrasion resistance, sealing, improving paint adhesion, and decorative finishing. Anodizing consists of electrically depositing an oxide film from aqueous solution onto the surface

  • Anodopetalum biglandulosum (plant)

    Tasmania: Plant and animal life: …remarkable small tree called the horizontal (Anodopetalum biglandulosum). The slender trunk of the tree falls over under its own weight, and from it branches arise that behave in the same way. On the mountain plateaus are found many plants having subantarctic affinities. These include Tasmania’s only deciduous tree or shrub,…

  • Anodorhynchus glaucus (bird)

    macaw: …that small populations of the glaucous macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus), which has been listed by the IUCN as a critically endangered species since 2000, continue to persist; the species was last observed in central South America in the 1960s, and several unconfirmed sightings of individuals have been reported since then.

  • Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus (bird)

    macaw: The cobalt-blue hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) of Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay is the largest of all parrots, measuring 95–100 cm (37.5–39.5 inches) long. The scarlet macaw (Ara macao) is probably the best-known New World parrot. Its brilliant red, yellow, and blue plumage contrasts with a bare white…

  • Anodorhynchus leari (bird)

    macaw: …Colombia and Central America, and Lear’s macaw (Anodorhynchus leari) of Brazil. The most recent confirmed sighting of a non-captive Spix’s macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii)—the bird that inspired the popular children’s films Rio (2011) and Rio 2 (2014)—occurred in 2000, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and other authorities…

  • Anoectochilus sandvicensis (plant)

    jewel orchid: The Hawai’i jewel orchid (Anoectochilus sandvicensis), A. setaceus, A. sikkimensis, Dossinia marmorata, Ludisia discolor, and Macodes petola are found in Southeast Asia and the Pacific and feature spikes of small white flowers. These species have wide

  • Anoectochilus setaceus (plant)

    jewel orchid: …Hawai’i jewel orchid (Anoectochilus sandvicensis), A. setaceus, A. sikkimensis, Dossinia marmorata, Ludisia discolor, and Macodes petola are found in Southeast Asia and the Pacific and feature spikes of small white flowers. These species have wide green or brownish green leaves with red or gold veins borne near the base of…

  • Anoectochilus sikkimensis (plant)

    jewel orchid: setaceus, A. sikkimensis, Dossinia marmorata, Ludisia discolor, and Macodes petola are found in Southeast Asia and the Pacific and feature spikes of small white flowers. These species have wide green or brownish green leaves with red or gold veins borne near the base of the plant.

  • Anoiapithecus brevirostris (fossil hominid)

    Lluc: …the only known specimen of Anoiapithecus brevirostris, a species that dates to the middle of the Miocene Epoch (roughly 11.9 million years ago). It was recovered during a salvage operation designed to rescue fossil specimens and associated data threatened by impending construction activities. In Latin the name Lluc means “the…

  • anointing of the sick (Christianity)

    Anointing of the sick, in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches, the ritual anointing of the seriously ill and the frail elderly. The sacrament is administered to give strength and comfort to the ill and to mystically unite their suffering with that of Christ during his Passion and

  • anointment (religion)

    Anointment, ritual application of oil or fat to the head or body of a person or to an object; an almost universal practice in the history of religions, although both the cultic practice followed and the sacred substance employed vary from one religion to another. It is possible to recognize three

  • Anokye, Okomfo (Asante priest)

    Okomfo Anokye, fetish priest (traditional spiritual leader) and cofounder of the Asante empire who was considered to be the greatest lawgiver and wisest sage of the Asante people in western Africa. He is known for his reported abilities in healing and regulating nature and for establishing codes of

  • anole (lizard)

    Anole, (genus Anolis), any of more than 250 species of small tree-dwelling lizards related to iguanas (family Iguanidae). Anoles occur throughout the warmer regions of the Americas and are especially abundant in the West Indies. Like the gecko, most anoles have enlarged finger and toe pads that are

  • Anolis (lizard)

    Anole, (genus Anolis), any of more than 250 species of small tree-dwelling lizards related to iguanas (family Iguanidae). Anoles occur throughout the warmer regions of the Americas and are especially abundant in the West Indies. Like the gecko, most anoles have enlarged finger and toe pads that are

  • Anolis carolinensis (lizard)

    anole: carolinensis, or green anole, commonly but erroneously called the American chameleon) is native to the southern United States. Its colour varies at times from green to brown or mottled, but its colour-changing ability is poor compared with that of the true chameleons of the Old World. Green…

  • Anomala binotata (insect)

    Shining leaf chafer, any member of the insect subfamily Rutelinae of the scarab family Scarabaeidae (order Coleoptera), including some of the most beautifully coloured and most destructive beetles. The iridescent and metallic colours of most species are produced by pigments in the integument

  • anomalepid (snake family)

    blind snake: Anomalepids (early blind snakes) and leptotyphlopids (threadsnakes and wormsnakes) are slender, and species of both families are seldom more than 30 cm (12 inches) long from snout to vent and grow to a maximum of 40 cm (16 inches) in total length. The anomalepids are made…

  • Anomalepidae (snake family)

    blind snake: Anomalepids (early blind snakes) and leptotyphlopids (threadsnakes and wormsnakes) are slender, and species of both families are seldom more than 30 cm (12 inches) long from snout to vent and grow to a maximum of 40 cm (16 inches) in total length. The anomalepids are made…

  • Anomalepididae (snake family)

    blind snake: Anomalepids (early blind snakes) and leptotyphlopids (threadsnakes and wormsnakes) are slender, and species of both families are seldom more than 30 cm (12 inches) long from snout to vent and grow to a maximum of 40 cm (16 inches) in total length. The anomalepids are made…

  • Anomalisa (film by Kaufman [2015])

    Charlie Kaufman: …and codirected the stop-motion animated Anomalisa (2015). Based on his earlier play, the film centres on a customer-service guru (David Thewlis) and the unique young woman (Jennifer Jason Leigh) he finds among the intentionally artificial, strangely similar figures populating a conference at a hotel. The film was remarked for its…

  • anomalist (linguistics)

    linguistics: Greek and Roman antiquity: …the views of the “anomalists,” who pointed to language’s lack of regularity as one facet of the inescapable irregularities of nature. The situation was more complex, however, than this statement would suggest. For example, it seems that the anomalists among the Stoics credited the irrational quality of language precisely…

  • anomalistic month (astronomy)

    eclipse: Cycles of eclipses: 992 anomalistic months, again nearly a whole number. In one anomalistic month, the Moon describes its orbit from perigee to perigee, the point at which it is nearest to Earth. Thus, the Moon’s distance from Earth is the same after a whole number of anomalistic months…

  • anomalistic year (astronomy)

    year: The anomalistic year (365 days 6 hours 13 minutes 53 seconds) is the time between two passages of Earth through perihelion, the point in its orbit nearest the Sun. A lunar year (used in some calendars) of 12 synodic months (12 cycles of lunar phases) is…

  • Anomalodesmata (bivalve subclass)

    bivalve: Annotated classification: Subclass Anomalodesmata Characterized by highly variable shell, either equivalve or inequivalve, often gaping either posteriorly or anteriorly; hinge plate thickened and enrolled but generally edentulous; shell of two or three layers, the inner nacreous; typically isomyarian but with wide variation; ctenidia either eulamellibranch and plicate or…

  • Anomalopidae

    Flashlight fish, any of three species of fishes in the family Anomalopidae (order Beryciformes), characterized by the presence of luminescent organs just below the eye. They are among the few species of non-deep-sea fishes to possess such organs. Bioluminescent bacteria create the light

  • Anomalopterygidae (extinct bird family)
  • anomalous dispersion (physics)

    radiation: Dispersion: …the latter phenomenon is called anomalous dispersion. A refractive index less than unity refers correctly to the fact that the speed of light in the medium at that frequency is greater than the speed of light in vacuum. The velocity referred to, however, is the phase velocity or the velocity…

  • anomalous monism (philosophy)

    Donald Davidson: …to his doctrine of “anomalous monism,” because causal laws are linguistic entities that apply to events under some descriptions but not others, it is possible for two events to be causally related—or even identical—though there is no causal law (in the strict sense) that captures this relation under the…

  • anomalous pulmonary venous return (pathology)

    cardiovascular disease: Anomalous pulmonary venous return: The pulmonary veins from the right and left lungs may connect either directly or indirectly to the right, instead of the left, atrium. In this condition the abnormal venous channel draining to the right side of the heart may become obstructed. Infants…

  • anomalous rectifier channel (biology)

    nervous system: Potassium channels: …of potassium channel is the anomalous, or inward, rectifier channel (IIR). This channel closes with depolarization and opens with hyperpolarization. By allowing an unusual inward diffusion of K+, the IIR channel prolongs depolarization of the neuron and helps produce long-lasting nerve impulses.

  • anomalous water (chemistry)

    Anomalous water, liquid water generally formed by condensation of water vapour in tiny glass or fused-quartz capillaries and with properties very different from those well established for ordinary water; e.g., lower vapour pressure, lower freezing temperature, higher density and viscosity, higher

  • anomalure (rodent)

    Anomalure, (family Anomaluridae), any of seven African species of rodents comprising the large anomalures (genus Anomalurus), pygmy anomalures (genus Idiurus), and flightless anomalure (genus Zenkerella). All live in tropical forests, and the large and pygmy anomalures are the only gliding mammals

  • Anomaluridae (rodent)

    Anomalure, (family Anomaluridae), any of seven African species of rodents comprising the large anomalures (genus Anomalurus), pygmy anomalures (genus Idiurus), and flightless anomalure (genus Zenkerella). All live in tropical forests, and the large and pygmy anomalures are the only gliding mammals

  • Anomaluromorpha (rodent suborder)

    rodent: Evolution and classification: Suborder Anomaluromorpha 2 extant families, 2 extinct families containing 4 genera. Early Miocene to present. Family Anomaluridae (anomalures) 7 species in 3 genera, 2 extinct genera. Late Eocene to present in Africa. Subfamily Anomalurinae (large anomalures)

  • Anomalurus (rodent)

    anomalure: Large and pygmy anomalures are nocturnal and nest in hollow trees, entering and exiting through holes located at various heights along the trunk. Colonies of up to 100 pygmy anomalures live in some trees. Large anomalures gnaw bark and then lick the exuding sap; they…

  • Anomalurus pelii (rodent)

    anomalure: …of the seven species is Pel’s anomalure (A. pelii), with a body 40 to 46 cm (16 to 18 inches) long and a tail of nearly the same length. The little anomalure (A. pusillus) is about half the size of Pel’s and has a proportionally shorter tail. The pygmy anomalures…

  • Anomalurus pusillus (rodent)

    anomalure: The little anomalure (A. pusillus) is about half the size of Pel’s and has a proportionally shorter tail. The pygmy anomalures (I. macrotis and I. zenkeri) are smaller still, ranging from 7 to 10 cm in body length, not including their long tails (9 to 13…

  • anomaly (prospecting)

    mining: Prospecting: …modern techniques is to find anomalies—i.e., differences between what is observed at a particular location and what would normally be expected. Aerial and satellite imagery provides one means of quickly examining large land areas and of identifying mineralizations that may be indicated by differences in geologic structure or in rock,…

  • anomaly (astronomy)

    Anomaly, in astronomy, originally the nonuniform (anomalous) apparent motions of the planets. In present usage, three kinds of anomaly are distinguished to describe the position in the orbit of a planet, a satellite, or a star (in a binary system) around the centre of mass. The following text

  • anomaly (weather)

    climate: Circulation, currents, and ocean-atmosphere interaction: Anomalies in the position of the Gulf Stream–Labrador Current boundary, which produce a greater or lesser extent of warm water near the Grand Banks, so affect the energy supply to the atmosphere and the development and steering of weather systems from that region that they…

  • anomaly detection (computer science)

    data mining: Anomaly detection: Anomaly detection can be viewed as the flip side of clustering—that is, finding data instances that are unusual and do not fit any established pattern. Fraud detection is an example of anomaly detection. Although fraud detection may be viewed as a problem for…

  • anomie (sociology)

    Anomie, in societies or individuals, a condition of instability resulting from a breakdown of standards and values or from a lack of purpose or ideals. The term was introduced by the French sociologist Émile Durkheim in his study of suicide. He believed that one type of suicide (anomic) resulted

  • Anomiidae (bivalve)

    Jingle shell, any of several marine invertebrates of the class Bivalvia belonging to the family Anomiidae. In most species of these oysterlike bivalves, one shell valve (i.e., half) is closely appressed to a rock surface and has a large hole in its wall through which a calcified byssus (tuft of

  • Anomoean (religious group)

    Anomoean, (from Greek anomoios, “unlike”), any member of a religious group of the 4th century that represented an extreme form of Arianism (q.v.), a Christian heresy that held that the essential difference between God and Christ was that God had always existed, while Christ was created by God.

  • Anomopoda (crustacean)

    Water flea, any member of the crustacean order Anomopoda (class Branchiopoda), a large group containing about 450 species distributed worldwide. Most forms are found in freshwater habitats, but a few occur in marine environments. The best known genus is Daphnia, ubiquitous in ponds and streams in

  • anomy (sociology)

    Anomie, in societies or individuals, a condition of instability resulting from a breakdown of standards and values or from a lack of purpose or ideals. The term was introduced by the French sociologist Émile Durkheim in his study of suicide. He believed that one type of suicide (anomic) resulted

  • Añón y Paz, Francisco (Galician poet)

    Spanish literature: The modern revival: Francisco Añón y Paz was the first notable poet in the resurrected idiom, his most stirring notes being love of country and of freedom. Rosalía de Castro, the greatest name in Galician literature, identified herself with the spirit and people of the Galician countryside in…

  • Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili (Italian car manufacturer)

    Alfa Romeo SpA, Italian manufacturer of high-priced sports cars and other vehicles. The company was operated by the Italian government through its state holding company, IRI (Istituto per la Ricostruzione Industriale), until 1986, when it was sold to Fiat SpA. Headquarters are in Milan. The

  • anonymity

    deindividuation: Origins of deindividuation theory: First, anonymity prevents people from being isolated or identified, which leads to a feeling of being untouchable and to a loss of a sense of personal responsibility. Le Bon further argued that such loss of control leads to contagion, in which a lack of responsibility spreads…

  • Anonymous (film by Emmerich [2011])

    Vanessa Redgrave: Movies from the 21st century: In Anonymous (2011), which advanced the theory that the plays attributed to Shakespeare were written by Edward de Vere, 17th earl of Oxford, Redgrave portrayed Elizabeth I. She then appeared as the strong-willed Volumnia in a 2011 film adaptation of Shakespeare’s Coriolanus and played a cancer…

  • Anonymous Group (Hungarian mathematics group)

    Paul Erdős: …mathematicians, who called themselves the Anonymous group, championed a fledgling branch of mathematics called Ramsey theory, which has as its philosophical underpinning the idea that complete disorder is impossible. A concrete example is the random scattering of points on a plane (a flat surface). The Ramsey theorist conjectures that no…

  • Anopheles (insect genus)

    mosquito: Anopheles mosquitoes: Anopheles, the only known carrier of malaria, also transmits filariasis and encephalitis. Anopheles mosquitoes are easily recognized in their resting position, in which the proboscis, head, and body are held on a straight line to each other but at an angle to the surface. The…

  • Anopheles gambiae (insect)

    malaria: Malaria through history: …in Brazil that eradicated the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, using a dust larvicide (Paris green) against the larvae and a newly discovered insecticide (pyrethrum) against the adult insects. The entire antimalarial effort was given an enormous boost in 1939 when the Swiss chemist Paul Müller discovered the insecticidal properties of DDT.…

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