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  • An (Mesopotamian god)

    Anu, Mesopotamian sky god and a member of the triad of deities completed by Enlil and Ea (Enki). Like most sky gods, Anu, although theoretically the highest god, played only a small role in the mythology, hymns, and cults of Mesopotamia. He was the father not only of all the gods but also of evil

  • An (chemical isotope)

    radon: Radon-219 (actinon; 3.92-second half-life), which is associated with actinium, was found independently in 1904 by German chemist Friedrich O. Giesel and French physicist André-Louis Debierne. Radioactive isotopes having masses ranging from 204 through 224 have been identified, the longest-lived of these being radon-222, which has…

  • AN (political party, Italy)

    National Alliance, former nationalist anticommunist political party of Italy. Historically, some of its members held neofascist views. The MSI was formed in 1946 by supporters of former Italian leader Benito Mussolini from elements of the defunct Uomo Qualunque (Average Man) Party that had appeared

  • An Chung-shik (Korean painter)

    An Chung-sik, the last gentleman painter of the great Korean Chosŏn dynasty (1392–1910). As a promising young painter, An Chung-sik was sent to China for training by the Korean court. Upon his return he became a master of the popular Southern style, with its emphasis on fingertip technique. He was

  • An Chung-sik (Korean painter)

    An Chung-sik, the last gentleman painter of the great Korean Chosŏn dynasty (1392–1910). As a promising young painter, An Chung-sik was sent to China for training by the Korean court. Upon his return he became a master of the popular Southern style, with its emphasis on fingertip technique. He was

  • An Cóbh (Ireland)

    Cobh, seaport and naval station, County Cork, Ireland, on the south side of Great Island and on a hill above the harbour of Cork city. The Cathedral of St. Colman crowns the hill. In 1838 the steamer Sirius set out from Cobh to become the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean, taking 18 12

  • An der schönen blauen Donau (composition by Strauss)

    The Blue Danube, Op. 314, waltz by Austrian composer Johann Strauss the Younger, created in 1867. The work epitomizes the symphonic richness and variety of Strauss’s dance music, which earned him acclaim as the “waltz king,” and it has become the best-known of his many dance pieces. The Blue Danube

  • An deux mille quatre cent quarante, L’ (work by Mercier)

    science fiction: Antecedents: 1771; “The Year 2440”; Memoirs of the Year Two Thousand Five Hundred), a work of French political speculation set in a 25th-century utopian society that worships science. While many writers had depicted some future utopian “Kingdom of God” or a utopian society in some mythical land, this was the…

  • An die Freude (poem by Schiller)

    Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125: …poem “An die Freude” (“Ode to Joy”). The work was Beethoven’s final complete symphony, and it represents an important stylistic bridge between the Classical and Romantic periods of Western music history. Symphony No. 9 premiered on May 7, 1824, in Vienna, to an overwhelmingly enthusiastic audience, and it is…

  • An I, L’ (play by Louvet)

    Jean Louvet: …many plays that followed are L’An I (1963; “The Year One”), which presents the dreams of a retired labourer; L’Amènagement (1979; “The Furnishings”), a critique of the petty bourgeoisie; and Le Coup de semonce (1995; figuratively, “The Shot Across the Bow” or “Warning Shot”), which dramatizes the 1945 Walloon Congress.

  • An Kyŏn (Korean painter)

    Korean art: Painting: …painters of the period are An Kyŏn, Ch’oe Kyŏng, and Yi Sang-chwa. An Kyŏn’s best work, Dream Journey to the Peach Blossom Land (1447), executed in the heroic style of the Bei Song, is a horizontal scroll depicting fantastic mountains and streams dotted with peach blossoms.

  • An Lu-shan (Chinese general)

    An Lushan, Chinese general of Iranian and Turkish descent who, as leader of a rebellion in ad 755, proclaimed himself emperor and unsuccessfully attempted to found a dynasty to replace the Tang dynasty (618–907). Despite its failure, the rebellion precipitated far-reaching social and economic

  • An Lushan (Chinese general)

    An Lushan, Chinese general of Iranian and Turkish descent who, as leader of a rebellion in ad 755, proclaimed himself emperor and unsuccessfully attempted to found a dynasty to replace the Tang dynasty (618–907). Despite its failure, the rebellion precipitated far-reaching social and economic

  • An Olympic-Sized Scandal

    In 1999 it appeared that the Olympic Games might take the gold for the century’s widest-reaching and most notorious sports scandal. Years in advance of each Olympic Games, members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) elect a host city from among those bidding to hold the event. The right to

  • An Qingxu (son of An Lushan)

    An Lushan: An Lushan’s rebellion: …of his own eldest son, An Qingxu, and others. The rebellion dragged on for several years, first under An Qingxu, then under a former subordinate, Shi Siming, then under Shi Siming’s son, Shi Chaoyi. Finally in 763 it officially came to an end with the defeat and death of Shi…

  • AN-2 (aircraft)

    history of flight: General aviation: …of similar versatility, the Antonov AN-2. With its 1,000-horsepower radial engine, the AN-2 possessed a capacious barrel-like fuselage that could accommodate a dozen or so passengers or 4,000 pounds (1,800 kg) of cargo. Introduced in 1947, it featured a biplane configuration, and its large wing area gave it excellent flying…

  • An-225 Mriya (aircraft)

    aerospace industry: Military aircraft: …several transports, among them the An-225 Mriya, a six-turbofan design originally conceived to carry oversized external loads piggyback-style for the Soviet space program.

  • An-ch’ing (China)

    Anqing, city situated on the north bank of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) in southwestern Anhui sheng (province), China. Situated at a crossing place on the Yangtze, it commands the narrow section of the floodplain between the Dabie Mountains to the north and the Huang Mountains on the south bank,

  • AN–FO (explosive)

    explosive: Ammonium nitrate–fuel oil mixtures: In 1955 it was discovered that mixtures of ammonium nitrate and fine coal dust would give very satisfactory blasting results in the large (about 22.5-centimetre, 9-inch) holes used in open-pit coal mines to remove the rock and soil covering the coal.…

  • An-gim dím-ma (Mesopotamian myth)

    Mesopotamian religion: Myths: Other myths about Ninurta are An-gim dím-ma and a myth of his contest with Enki. The first of these tells how Ninurta, on returning from battle to Nippur, was met by Enlil’s page Nusku, who ordered him to cease his warlike clamour and not scare Enlil and the other gods.…

  • An-hui (province, China)

    Anhui, sheng (province), eastern China. It is one of the country’s smallest provinces, stretching for some 350 miles (570 km) from north to south. Landlocked, it is bounded by the provinces of Jiangsu to the northeast, Zhejiang to the southeast, Jiangxi to the south, and Hubei and Henan to the

  • An-k’ang (China)

    Ankang, city in southeastern Shaanxi sheng (province), China. It is situated in the narrow valley of the Han River between the Qin (Tsinling) and Daba mountain ranges and has been an important trade centre since antiquity. Ankang first emerged as an independent administrative centre in the 3rd

  • An-p’ing (district, Taiwan)

    An-p’ing, seaport and former town, now a city district (ch’ü, or qu) of T’ai-nan special municipality, southwestern Taiwan. Situated on the Taiwan Strait, it is the traditional port for T’ai-nan. An-p’ing is the oldest Chinese settlement in southern Taiwan, dating from the late 16th century. It is

  • An-shan (China)

    Anshan, city, central Liaoning sheng (province), China. It lies about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Shenyang (Mukden). Originally a post station on the road from northern China to Liaoyang in the Northeast, Anshan was made a town in 1379 and fortified as part of the defenses set up by the Ming

  • An-shun (China)

    Anshun, city, west central Guizhou sheng (province), China. Anshun, a county-level municipality, is located along the strategic passage to Yunnan province to the west and has long been an important thoroughfare between Yunnan and Guizhou. Anshun, called Yelang state during the period of the Warring

  • An-ski, S. (Russian writer)

    S. Ansky, Russian Jewish writer and folklorist best known for his play The Dybbuk. Ansky was educated in a Ḥasidic environment and as a young man was attracted to the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskala) and to the populist doctrines of the Narodniki, a group of socialist revolutionaries. For a time he

  • An-to (region, China)

    A-mdo, one of three historical regions of Central Asia (the other two being Dbus-Gtsang and Khams) into which Tibet was once divided. Between the 7th and 9th centuries ce, the Tibetan kingdom was extended until it reached the Tarim Basin to the north, China to the east, India and Nepal to the

  • An-yang (China)

    Anyang, city, northern Henan sheng (province), northeast-central China, on the Anyang River, a tributary of the Wei River. It was important in history as the site of the ancient city of Yin, the capital of the Shang dynasty (1600–1046 bce) from the 14th century bce; the Shang palace stood about 10

  • AN/APG-68 (radar technology)

    radar: Airborne combat radar: The AN/APG-68(V)XM radar built for the U.S. F-16 (C/D) fighter is shown in the photograph. This is a pulse Doppler radar system that operates in a portion of the X-band (8- to 12-GHz) region of the spectrum. It occupies a volume of less than 0.13 cubic…

  • AN/APG-77 (radar technology)

    radar: Airborne combat radar: The AN/APG-77 radar for the U.S. Air Force F-22 stealth dual-role fighter employs what is called an active-aperture phased-array radar rather than a mechanically scanned planar-array antenna. At each radiating element of the active-aperture phased-array is an individual transmitter, receiver, phase shifter, duplexer, and control.

  • AN/FPS-115

    radar: Ballistic missile defense and satellite-surveillance radars: The Pave Paws radar (AN/FPS-115) is an ultrahigh-frequency (UHF; 420–450 MHz) phased-array system for detecting submarine-launched ballistic missiles. It is supposed to detect targets with a radar cross section of 10 square metres at a range of 3,000 nautical miles (5,600 km). The array antenna contains…

  • AN/FPS-16 (radar technology)

    radar: Postwar progress: …monopulse tracking radar designated the AN/FPS-16, which was capable of an angular accuracy of about 0.1 milliradian (roughly 0.006 degree). There also appeared large, high-powered radars designed to operate at 220 MHz (VHF) and 450 MHz (UHF). These systems, equipped with large mechanically rotating antennas (more than 120 feet [37…

  • AN/TPS-71 (radar technology)

    radar: Over-the-horizon radar: …OTH radars known as relocatable over-the-horizon radar (ROTHR), or AN/TPS-71, have been redirected for use in drug interdiction. Such radars, located in Virginia, Texas, and Puerto Rico, provide multiple coverage of drug-traffic regions in Central America and the northern part of South America. An ROTHR can cover a 64-degree…

  • ANA (American medical organization)

    American Nurses Association (ANA), national professional organization that promotes and protects the welfare of nurses in their work settings, projects a positive view of the nursing profession, and advocates on issues of concern to nurses and the general public. In the early 21st century the

  • ANA (Japanese company)

    All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd. (ANA), the largest domestic air carrier in Japan, and one of the largest in the world. The company was founded in 1952 and is headquartered in Tokyo. Under the Japanese government’s strict regulation of civil aviation, All Nippon Airways was basically restricted to

  • Ana de Sousa (African queen)

    Matamba: …1630–32 it was conquered by Njinga Mbande (often referred to simply as Njinga, also spelled Nzinga, Jinga, or Ginga; also known by her Christian name, Ana de Sousa), ruler of the neighbouring Ndongo kingdom, when she was expelled from some of her domains by rivals and their Portuguese allies. Matamba…

  • Ana de Sousa Nzinga (African queen)

    Matamba: …1630–32 it was conquered by Njinga Mbande (often referred to simply as Njinga, also spelled Nzinga, Jinga, or Ginga; also known by her Christian name, Ana de Sousa), ruler of the neighbouring Ndongo kingdom, when she was expelled from some of her domains by rivals and their Portuguese allies. Matamba…

  • Ana Sagar (lake, India)

    Ajmer: To the north lies Ana Sagar, a lake created in the 11th century, on the shores of which stand marble pavilions built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahān (reigned 1628–58).

  • Anā ummak yā Shākir (play by al-ʿĀnī)

    Arabic literature: Modern Arabic drama: …playwrights was Yūsuf al-ʿĀnī, whose Anā ummak yā Shākir (1955; “Shākir, I’m Your Mother”) graphically portrays the misery of the Iraqi people in the period before the downfall of the monarchy in the revolution of 1958. Elsewhere in the Arabian Gulf, theatre remained, where it existed at all, a very…

  • Ana y los lobos (film by Saura [1972])

    Carlos Saura: Ana y los lobos (1972; Anna and the Wolves) was also delayed by the censors; in it a governess in a crumbling mansion is beset by brothers who symbolize, according to Saura, “the three monsters of Spain: perversion of religiosity, repressed sexuality, and the authoritarian spirit.” His La prima Angélica…

  • Anab (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Air-to-air: …after the Sidewinder, and the AA-3 Anab, a long-range, semiactive radar-homing missile carried by air-defense fighters. The AA-5 Ash was a large, medium-range radar-guided missile, while the AA-6 Acrid was similar to the Anab but larger and with greater range. The AA-7 Apex, a Sparrow equivalent, and the AA-8 Aphid,…

  • Anabaena (cyanobacteria)

    Anabaena, genus of nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae with beadlike or barrel-like cells and interspersed enlarged spores (heterocysts), found as plankton in shallow water and on moist soil. There are both solitary and colonial forms, the latter resembling a closely related genus, Nostoc. In

  • Anabaena azollae (cyanobacteria)

    Salviniales: Azolla and the blue-green alga Anabaena azollae maintain a symbiotic relationship: the alga provides nitrogen to the fern, and the fern provides a habitat for the alga. This property of nitrogen fixation has made Azolla extremely important economically in the cultivation of rice, particularly in Asia. The species of the…

  • Anabantidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Anabantidae Pleistocene to present; about 33 species, freshwaters of tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines; includes the “climbing perch”; size small. Family Osphronemida (fighting fishes, gouramis, pikeheads, and others) About 86 species of small freshwater fishes from tropical Africa, India, Myanmar

  • Anabantoidei (fish)

    Labyrinth fish, any of the small tropical fish of the suborder Anabantoidei (order Perciformes). Labyrinth fishes, like most other fishes, breathe with their gills, but they also possess a supplemental breathing structure, the labyrinth, for which they are named. This apparatus, located in a

  • Anabaptists (Protestantism)

    Anabaptist, (from Greek ana, “again”) member of a fringe, or radical, movement of the Protestant Reformation and spiritual ancestor of modern Baptists, Mennonites, and Quakers. The movement’s most distinctive tenet was adult baptism. In its first generation, converts submitted to a second baptism,

  • Anabar Shield (geological region, Russia)

    Precambrian: Occurrence and distribution of Precambrian rocks: … in India; the Aldan and Anabar shields in Siberia in Russia; the Baltic Shield that includes much of Sweden, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of far northern Russia; the Superior and Slave provinces in Canada; and

  • Anabas testudineus (fish)

    Climbing perch, (Anabas testudineus), small Asian freshwater fish of the family Anabantidae (order Perciformes) noted for its ability to live and walk about out of water. The climbing perch is an air-breathing labyrinth fish. Rather oblong, brownish or green, it grows to about 25 cm (10 inches). I

  • Anabasis (work by Xenophon)

    Anabasis, (Greek: “Upcountry March”) prose narrative, now in seven books, by Xenophon, of the story of the Greek mercenary soldiers who fought for Cyrus the Younger in his attempt to seize the Persian throne from his brother, Artaxerxes II. It contains a famous account of the mercenaries’ long trek

  • Anabasis (work by Arrian)

    Arrian: Titled Anabasis, presumably in order to recall Xenophon’s work of that title, it describes Alexander’s military exploits in seven books; an eighth, the Indica, tells of Indian customs and the voyage of Nearchus in the Persian Gulf, with borrowings from Megasthenes and Eratosthenes.

  • Anabasis Kyrou (work by Xenophon)

    Anabasis, (Greek: “Upcountry March”) prose narrative, now in seven books, by Xenophon, of the story of the Greek mercenary soldiers who fought for Cyrus the Younger in his attempt to seize the Persian throne from his brother, Artaxerxes II. It contains a famous account of the mercenaries’ long trek

  • anabatic wind

    Anabatic wind, local air current that blows up a hill or mountain slope facing the Sun. During the day, the Sun heats such a slope (and the air over it) faster than it does the adjacent atmosphere over a valley or a plain at the same altitude. This warming decreases the density of the air, causing

  • Anableps (fish)

    Four-eyed fish, either of two species of tropical American river fishes of the genus Anableps (family Anablepidae, order Atheriniformes). Four-eyed fishes are surface dwellers and have eyes adapted for seeing both above and below the water surface. The eyes are on top of the head, and each is

  • anabolic reaction (biochemistry)

    Anabolism, the sequences of enzyme-catalyzed reactions by which relatively complex molecules are formed in living cells from nutrients with relatively simple structures. Anabolic processes, which include the synthesis of such cell components as carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, require energy in

  • anabolic steroid (biochemistry)

    Anabolic steroid, drug that mimics the male hormone testosterone in its ability to increase the growth of muscle tissue and in its promotion of male secondary sex characteristics. Anabolic steroids are used medically in humans to treat a variety of conditions, including anemia, breast cancer,

  • anabolism (biochemistry)

    Anabolism, the sequences of enzyme-catalyzed reactions by which relatively complex molecules are formed in living cells from nutrients with relatively simple structures. Anabolic processes, which include the synthesis of such cell components as carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, require energy in

  • Anabrus simplex (insect)

    shield-backed katydid: The Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex) is a well-known wingless species of shield-backed katydid in North America, where it once was a serious pest in the Great Plains. In 1848 at Salt Lake City, Deseret (later Utah), the arrival of a flock of sea gulls saved the…

  • Anacanthobatidae (fish)

    skate: families—Rajidae, Arynchobatidae, and Anacanthobatidae—while others place all skates into family Rajidae.

  • Anacaona (Taino leader)

    Léogâne: …the birthplace of Taino leader Anacaona (c. 1474–c. 1503). Anacaona ruled the province of Xaragua, the last independent holdout during the Spanish conquest of Hispaniola, until her execution by the Spanish. After Spain’s cession of Haiti to France in the Treaty of Rijswijk (1697), the French built up Léogâne, which…

  • Anacardiaceae (plant family)

    Anacardiaceae, the sumac family of flowering plants (order Sapindales), with about 80 genera and about 870 species of evergreen or deciduous trees, shrubs, and woody vines. Most members of Anacardiaceae are native to tropical and subtropical areas of the world. A few species occur in temperate

  • Anacardium (plant genus)

    Sapindales: Anacardiaceae: The tropical American Anacardium humile, A. occidentale, and A. nanum produce cashew gum, a substitute for gum arabic. Not only are they good adhesives, but they also contain a small amount of cashew oil, which can be used as an insect repellent or as a lubricant in the…

  • Anacardium excelsum (tree)

    Wild cashew, (Anacardium excelsum), tropical forest tree of the cashew family (Anacardiaceae), native to Central and South America. Wild cashew trees are characteristic of both secondary and old growth forests. As its name suggests, the wild cashew is closely related to the domesticated cashew

  • Anacardium occidentale (plant)

    Cashew, (Anacardium occidentale), evergreen shrub or tree of the sumac family (Anacardiaceae), cultivated for its characteristically curved edible seeds, which are commonly called cashew “nuts” though they are not true nuts. The domesticated cashew tree is native to the New World but commercially

  • Anacharsis (legendary Scythian prince)

    Anacharsis, legendary Scythian prince included in some ancient Greek lists as one of the Seven Wise Men and extolled as an exemplar of primitive virtue. Herodotus describes how, after extensive travels abroad in quest of knowledge or as an ambassador, Anacharsis returned home and was killed by the

  • anachronism

    Anachronism, (from Greek ana, “back,” and chronos, “time”), neglect or falsification, intentional or not, of chronological relation. It is most frequently found in works of imagination that rest on a historical basis, in which appear details borrowed from a later age; e.g., a clock in William

  • Anacletus II (antipope)

    Anacletus (II), antipope from 1130 to 1138 whose claims to the papacy against Pope Innocent II are still supported by some scholars. After study in Paris, he became a monk at Cluny and was made cardinal at Rome in 1116 by Pope Paschal II. In 1118 he accompanied Pope Gelasius II, who fled to France

  • Anacletus, Saint (pope)

    Saint Anacletus, ; feast day April 26), second pope (76–88 or 79–91) after St. Peter. According to St. Epiphanius and the priest Tyrannius Rufinus, he directed the Roman Church with St. Linus, successor to St. Peter, during Peter’s lifetime. He died, probably a martyr, during the reign of

  • Anaconda (work by Quiroga)

    Horacio Quiroga: …generally recognized as his masterpiece, Anaconda (1921), portrays on several levels—realistic, philosophical, and symbolic—the battles of the snakes in the tropical jungle, the nonpoisonous anaconda and the poisonous viper.

  • anaconda (reptile)

    Anaconda, (genus Eunectes), either of two species of constricting, water-loving snakes found in tropical South America. The green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), also called the giant anaconda, sucuri, or water kamudi, is an olive-coloured snake with alternating oval-shaped black spots. The yellow, or

  • Anaconda (film by llosa [1997])

    Jennifer Lopez: …thrillers and action dramas, including Anaconda (1997), U Turn (1997), Out of Sight (1998), and The Cell (2000), and she gained widespread praise for The Wedding Planner (2001), her successful first attempt at romantic comedy. That release was quickly followed by the romantic drama Angel Eyes in the middle of

  • Anaconda (Montana, United States)

    Anaconda, city, seat (since 1977) of Anaconda-Deer Lodge county, southwestern Montana, U.S., 23 miles (37 km) northwest of Butte. Laid out in 1883 as Copperopolis by Marcus Daly, founder of Montana’s copper industry, the settlement was the seat of Deer Lodge county. In 1977 the governments of

  • Anaconda Company (American company)

    Anaconda Company, former American mining company, for much of the 20th century one of the largest mining companies in the world. Originally producing copper, it later moved into other metals, including aluminum, silver, and uranium, as well as numerous related operations. In 1977 it became a

  • Anaconda Copper Mining Company (American company)

    Anaconda Company, former American mining company, for much of the 20th century one of the largest mining companies in the world. Originally producing copper, it later moved into other metals, including aluminum, silver, and uranium, as well as numerous related operations. In 1977 it became a

  • Anaconda mine (mine, Montana, United States)

    Marcus Daly: …in order to purchase the Anaconda mine near Butte, Mont., for $30,000 in 1880. Though at first the mine was thought to contain only silver, a rich vein of copper was soon discovered and proved to be the largest bed of the metal discovered up to that time. Daly built…

  • Anaconda plan (American Civil War)

    Anaconda plan, military strategy proposed by Union General Winfield Scott early in the American Civil War. The plan called for a naval blockade of the Confederate littoral, a thrust down the Mississippi, and the strangulation of the South by Union land and naval

  • Anacortes (Washington, United States)

    Anacortes, city, Skagit county, northwestern Washington, U.S., on the northern tip of Fidalgo Island. Connected by ferry to the San Juan Islands and Victoria, British Columbia, the city originated in the 1860s as a port called Ship Harbor. Local real estate developer Amos Bowman fancifully renamed

  • Anacostia (neighborhood, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Anacostia: Anacostia, which lies southeast of the Anacostia River, is a mostly lower-income neighbourhood with a predominantly African American population. Part of the area was first subdivided and developed in 1854, and the 11th Street Bridge across the Anacostia River was built in 1874 to connect…

  • Anacreon (Greek poet)

    Anacreon, ancient Greek lyric poet who wrote in the Ionic dialect. Only fragments of his verse have survived. The edition of Anacreon’s poetry known to later generations was probably prepared in Alexandria by Aristarchus in the 2nd century bce and divided into 9 or 10 books on the basis of metrical

  • Anacreontea (collection of poems)

    Anacreon: There thus arose the Anacreontea, a collection of about 60 short poems composed by post-Classical Greek writers at various dates and first published by French scholar-printer Henri II Estienne as the work of Anacreon in 1554. These had a great influence on Renaissance French poetry. The word Anacreontics was…

  • Anacreontic poetry

    Anacreon: The word Anacreontics was first used in England in 1656 by English poet and essayist Abraham Cowley to denote a verse metre supposedly used by the ancient Greek poet and consisting of seven or eight syllables with three or four main stresses. Anacreon himself, it should be…

  • anacrusis (prosody)

    Anacrusis, in classical prosody, the up (or weak) beat, one or more syllables at the beginning of a line of poetry that are not regarded as a part of the metrical pattern of that line. Some scholars do not acknowledge this phenomenon. The term is from the Greek anákrousis, meaning “the act of

  • Anadara (bivalve genus)

    ark shell: …species, particularly of the genus Anadara, live shallowly buried in sands and silts. Some species, such as the western African Anadara senilis and the Southeast Asian Anadara granosa, have provided a source of food for humans since prehistoric times.

  • Anadara granosa (bivalve)

    ark shell: …senilis and the Southeast Asian Anadara granosa, have provided a source of food for humans since prehistoric times.

  • Anadara senilis (bivalve)

    ark shell: …such as the western African Anadara senilis and the Southeast Asian Anadara granosa, have provided a source of food for humans since prehistoric times.

  • Anadarko (Oklahoma, United States)

    Anadarko, city, seat (1907) of Caddo county, southwest-central Oklahoma, U.S. It lies along the Washita River. Founded in 1901 when the site was opened to white settlement, the city was named for the Nadako Indians, a Caddo subgroup. Anadarko is the site of the Southern Plains Indian Museum and

  • Anadarko Basin (geological feature, United States)

    Permian Period: Basin sedimentation: Many intracratonic basins—such as the Anadarko, Delaware, and Midland basins in the western United States; the Zechstein Basin of northwestern Europe; and the Kazan Basin of eastern Europe—show similar general changes. In most basins the inner parts became sites of red bed deposition during the Early Permian, followed by periods…

  • anadiplosis (literature)

    Anadiplosis, (Greek: “doubling” or “repetition,”) a device in which the last word or phrase of one clause, sentence, or line is repeated at the beginning of the next. An example is the phrase that is repeated between stanzas one and two of John Keats’s poem “The Eve of St.

  • Anadolu (historical region, Asia)

    Anatolia, the peninsula of land that today constitutes the Asian portion of Turkey. Because of its location at the point where the continents of Asia and Europe meet, Anatolia was, from the beginnings of civilization, a crossroads for numerous peoples migrating or conquering from either continent.

  • Anadoluhisarı (castle, Turkey)

    Bosporus: …examples are the castles of Anadoluhisarı, which was constructed on the Asian shore by Bayezid I in 1390–91, and Rumelihisarı, built directly across the strait by Mehmed II in 1452. With the growing influence of the European powers in the 19th century, rules were codified (in treaties of 1841 and…

  • anadromous fish (zoology)

    migration: Anadromous fish: Anadromous fish live in the sea and migrate to fresh water to breed. Their adaptations to conditions of different habitats are precise, particularly with regard to salinity of the water.

  • Anadyr (Russia)

    Anadyr, town and administrative centre, Chukchi autonomous okrug (district), far northeastern Russia. It lies on the southern shore of the estuary of the Anadyr River, which empties into the Bering Sea. Incorporated as a town in 1965, it is a port on the Northern Sea Route and has a meteorologic

  • Anadyr Bay (gulf, Bering Sea)

    Gulf of Anadyr, gulf in far eastern Russia, in the northwestern part of the Bering Sea. The width of the gulf at its entrance is about 250 miles (400 km), and it runs inland for some 200 miles (320 km), extending into the Bay of Krest and the Anadyr River estuary. The Gulf of Anadyr is closed by

  • Anadyr River (river, Asia)

    Asia: Rivers: …the Pacific Ocean are the Anadyr, Amur (combined with the Sungari [Songhua] and the Ussuri rivers), Huang He (Yellow River), Yangtze (Chang), Xi, Red, Mekong, and Chao Phraya.

  • Anadyr, Gulf of (gulf, Bering Sea)

    Gulf of Anadyr, gulf in far eastern Russia, in the northwestern part of the Bering Sea. The width of the gulf at its entrance is about 250 miles (400 km), and it runs inland for some 200 miles (320 km), extending into the Bay of Krest and the Anadyr River estuary. The Gulf of Anadyr is closed by

  • Anadyrsky Zaliv (gulf, Bering Sea)

    Gulf of Anadyr, gulf in far eastern Russia, in the northwestern part of the Bering Sea. The width of the gulf at its entrance is about 250 miles (400 km), and it runs inland for some 200 miles (320 km), extending into the Bay of Krest and the Anadyr River estuary. The Gulf of Anadyr is closed by

  • anaemia (disease)

    Anemia, condition in which the red blood cells (erythrocytes) are reduced in number or volume or are deficient in hemoglobin, their oxygen-carrying pigment. The most noticeable outward symptom of anemia is usually pallor of the skin, mucous membranes, and nail beds. Symptoms of tissue oxygen

  • anaerobe (biology)

    Archean Eon: …removal of oxygen allowed early anaerobes (life-forms not requiring oxygen for respiration) to develop in the early oceans of Earth.

  • anaerobic bacteria (biology)

    Archean Eon: …removal of oxygen allowed early anaerobes (life-forms not requiring oxygen for respiration) to develop in the early oceans of Earth.

  • anaerobic digestion (chemical process)

    Anaerobic digestion, chemical process in which organic matter is broken down by microorganisms in the absence of oxygen, which results in the generation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Materials high in organic content, such as municipal wastewater, livestock waste, agricultural waste,

  • anaerobic respiration (biology)

    bacteria: Heterotrophic metabolism: …anaerobic conditions by processes called anaerobic respiration, in which the final electron acceptor is an inorganic molecule, such as nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), sulfate (SO42−), or carbon dioxide (CO2). The energy yields available to the cell using these acceptors are lower than in respiration with oxygen—much lower

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