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  • amphitheatre (architecture)

    Amphitheatre, freestanding building of round or, more often, oval shape with a central area, the arena, and seats concentrically placed around it. The word is Greek, meaning “theatre with seats on all sides,” but as an architectural form the amphitheatre is of Italic or Etrusco-Campanian origin and

  • Amphithéâtre Franconi (French circus)

    Antonio Franconi: …from Astley, renaming it the Amphithéâtre Franconi. Thereafter, Franconi concentrated on expanding and varying his spectacles, especially with trick riding (in which he himself had some skill). He subsequently built the Cirque Olympique de Franconi, management of which he transferred, in 1805, to his sons Henri and Laurent, who likewise…

  • Amphitherium (fossil mammal)

    Amphitherium, extinct genus of early mammals known as fossils from Middle Jurassic deposits (of 176 million to 161 million years ago). Amphitherium is the earliest representative of the pantotheres, a group of early mammals that, it is believed, represents the stock that gave rise to all the

  • Amphitrite (Greek mythology)

    Amphitrite, in Greek mythology, the goddess of the sea, wife of the god Poseidon, and one of the 50 (or 100) daughters (the Nereids) of Nereus and Doris (the daughter of Oceanus). Poseidon chose Amphitrite from among her sisters as the Nereids performed a dance on the isle of Naxos. Refusing his

  • Amphitryon (Greek mythology)

    Amphitryon, in Greek mythology, son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns. Having accidentally killed his uncle Electryon, king of Mycenae, Amphitryon fled with Alcmene, Electryon’s daughter, to Thebes, where he was cleansed from the guilt by Creon, his maternal uncle, king of Thebes. Alcmene refused to

  • amphiuma (salamander)

    Amphiuma, any of three species of North American salamanders belonging to the family Amphiumidae (order Caudata). Because they are long and slender and have inconspicuous legs, they are often mistaken for eels or snakes. The body is gray or brown and paler on the lower side. The usual habitat is

  • Amphiuma (salamander)

    Amphiuma, any of three species of North American salamanders belonging to the family Amphiumidae (order Caudata). Because they are long and slender and have inconspicuous legs, they are often mistaken for eels or snakes. The body is gray or brown and paler on the lower side. The usual habitat is

  • amphiumid (amphibian family)

    Caudata: Annotated classification: Family Amphiumidae (congo eels) Large, to more than 100 cm; very elongated; aquatic to semiaquatic; predaceous, with powerful jaws and teeth; limbs diminutive, 1 to 3 fingers and toes; external gills absent, but spiracle open; Late Cretaceous to present; eastern North America; 1 genus, Amphiuma, and…

  • Amphiumidae (amphibian family)

    Caudata: Annotated classification: Family Amphiumidae (congo eels) Large, to more than 100 cm; very elongated; aquatic to semiaquatic; predaceous, with powerful jaws and teeth; limbs diminutive, 1 to 3 fingers and toes; external gills absent, but spiracle open; Late Cretaceous to present; eastern North America; 1 genus, Amphiuma, and…

  • Amphizoidae (insect)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Amphizoidae (trout-stream beetles) About 5 species (Amphizoa) in Tibet, North America; feed on drowned insects. Family Aspidytidae (cliff water beetles) 2 species (Aspidytes). Family Carabidae (ground beetles) Usually dark,

  • Amphlett, Chrissy (Australian singer-songwriter)

    Chrissy Amphlett, (Christine Joy Amphlett), Australian singer-songwriter (born Oct. 25, 1959, Geelong, Vic., Australia—died April 21, 2013, New York, N.Y.), brought a rich, powerful voice and raw sexuality—enhanced by her signature stage costume of fishnet stockings and miniskirted schoolgirl

  • ampholyte (chemistry)

    separation and purification: Field separations: …mixture of buffers (known as ampholytes) that, under the influence of an applied field, migrate to the position of their respective isoelectric points and then remain fixed. A pH gradient is established, which then allows focusing of proteins at their respective isoelectric points.

  • ampholytic detergent

    soap and detergent: The first detergent (or surface-active agent) was soap. In a strictly chemical sense, any compound formed by the reaction…

  • amphora (measurement)

    Amphora, ancient Roman unit of capacity for grain and liquid products equal to 48 sextarii and equivalent to about 27.84 litres (7.36 U.S. gallons). The term amphora was borrowed from the Greeks, who used it to designate a measure equal to about 34 litres (9 U.S.

  • amphora (pottery)

    Amphora, ancient vessel form used as a storage jar and one of the principal vessel shapes in Greek pottery, a two-handled pot with a neck narrower than the body. There are two types of amphora: the neck amphora, in which the neck meets the body at a sharp angle; and the one-piece amphora, in which

  • amphoteric detergent

    soap and detergent: The first detergent (or surface-active agent) was soap. In a strictly chemical sense, any compound formed by the reaction…

  • amphotericin B (drug)

    drug: Membrane lipids: …type is the antifungal agent amphotericin B, which binds to a specific molecule (ergosterol) found in fungal cells. This binding results in the formation of pores in the membrane and leakage of intracellular components, leading to death of the cell.

  • amphoterism (chemistry)

    Amphoterism, in chemistry, reactivity of a substance with both acids and bases, acting as an acid in the presence of a base and as a base in the presence of an acid. Water is an example of an amphoteric substance. The dissolution of hydrogen chloride (an acid) and ammonia (a base) in water may be

  • ampicillin (drug)

    Ampicillin, drug used in the treatment of various infections, including otitis media (middle ear infection), sinusitis, and acute bacterial cystitis. Ampicillin (or alpha-aminobenzylpenicillin) is a semisynthetic penicillin, one of the first such antibiotics developed. Similar in action to

  • amplexus (amphibian behaviour)

    Anura: Breeding behaviour: …in a copulatory embrace called amplexus, she selects the site for depositing the eggs. In the more primitive frogs (the families Ascaphidae, Leiopelmatidae, Bombinatoridae, and Discoglossidae and the mesobatrachians), the male grasps the female from above and around the waist (inguinal amplexus), whereas in the more advanced frogs (neobatrachians) the…

  • ampliative reasoning (logic)

    logic: Rules of ampliative reasoning: In a broad sense of both “logic” and “inference,” any rule-governed move from a number of propositions to a new one in reasoning can be considered a logical inference, if it is calculated to further one’s knowledge of a given topic. The rules…

  • amplidyne (mechanics)

    Ernst F.W. Alexanderson: He also developed the amplidyne, an extremely sophisticated automatic control system first used in factories to automate intricate manufacturing processes and used during World War II in conjunction with antiaircraft guns.

  • amplification (genetics)

    cancer: Gene amplification: Gene amplification is another type of chromosomal abnormality exhibited by some human tumours. It involves an increase in the number of copies of a proto-oncogene, an aberration that also can result in excessive production of the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene. Amplification of the…

  • amplification (physics)

    distortion: Straight amplification or attenuation without alteration of the waveform is not usually considered to be distortion. Amplitude distortion refers to unequal amplification or attenuation of the various frequency components of the signal, and phase distortion refers to changes in the phase relationships between harmonic components of…

  • amplifier (electronics)

    Amplifier, in electronics, device that responds to a small input signal (voltage, current, or power) and delivers a larger output signal that contains the essential waveform features of the input signal. Amplifiers of various types are widely used in such electronic equipment as radio and

  • amplifier, optical (communications)

    laser: Laser elements: …laser would just be an optical amplifier, which can amplify light from an external source but not generate a beam internally. Elias Snitzer, a researcher at American Optical, demonstrated the first optical amplifier in 1961, but such devices were little used until the spread of communications based on fibre optics.

  • amplitude (physics)

    Amplitude, in physics, the maximum displacement or distance moved by a point on a vibrating body or wave measured from its equilibrium position. It is equal to one-half the length of the vibration path. The amplitude of a pendulum is thus one-half the distance that the bob traverses in moving from

  • amplitude distortion (physics)

    distortion: Amplitude distortion refers to unequal amplification or attenuation of the various frequency components of the signal, and phase distortion refers to changes in the phase relationships between harmonic components of a complex wave. Intermodulation distortion is a result of nonlinearities in the system such that…

  • amplitude modulation (electronics)

    Amplitude modulation (AM), variation of the amplitude of a carrier wave (commonly a radio wave) in accordance with the characteristics of a signal, such as a vocal or musical sound composed of audio-frequency waves. See

  • amplitude, pulse (radiation)

    radiation measurement: Pulse mode: …is its maximum size, or amplitude. Under the conditions described, the amplitude is given by Vmax = Q/C, where Q is the charge produced by the individual quantum in the detector and C is the capacitance of the measuring circuit. Under typical conditions tail pulses are then amplified and shaped…

  • amplitude-shift keying (communications)

    telecommunication: Amplitude-shift keying: If amplitude is the only parameter of the carrier wave to be altered by the information signal, the modulating method is called amplitude-shift keying (ASK). ASK can be considered a digital version of analog amplitude modulation. In its simplest form, a burst of…

  • AMPS (telecommunications)

    telecommunication: Frequency-division multiple access: In the advanced mobile phone system (AMPS), the cellular system employed in the United States, different callers use separate frequency slots via FDMA. When one telephone call is completed, a network-managing computer at the cellular base station reassigns the released frequency slot to a new caller. A…

  • Ampthill (England, United Kingdom)

    Ampthill, town (parish), Central Bedfordshire unitary authority, historic county of Bedfordshire, south-central England. It is located 8 miles (13 km) south-southwest of Bedford. The Church of St. Andrew contains a monument to Richard Nicolls (1624–72), the first English governor of New York.

  • Ampthill of Ampthill, Odo William Leopold Russell, 1st Baron (British diplomat)

    Odo William Leopold Russell, 1st Baron Ampthill, British diplomat, the first British ambassador to the German Empire (1871–84). A member of a prominent family, Russell as a youth became fluent in French, German, and Italian through tutoring and wide travel and also acquired the social gifts for a

  • ampulla (flask)

    Ampulla, a small narrow-necked, round-bodied vase for holding liquids, especially oil and perfumes. It was used in the ancient Mediterranean for toilet purposes and for anointing the bodies of the dead, being then buried with them. In early medieval times in Europe, ampullae were used in a

  • ampulla (anatomy)

    locomotion: Bottom locomotion: …capped by a hollow muscular ampulla (a small, bladder-like enlargement). When the ampulla contracts, it forces fluid into the tube foot and extends it. Preferential contraction of muscles in the wall of the tube foot controls the direction of and the retraction of the tube foot. When the tube foot…

  • ampulla of Lorenzini (anatomy)

    lateral line system: …modified to become electroreceptors called ampullae of Lorenzini. These receptors are concentrated on the heads of sharks and can detect the minute electrical potentials generated by the muscle contractions of prey. Ampullae of Lorenzini can also detect Earth’s electromagnetic field, and sharks apparently use these electroreceptors for homing and migration.

  • ampulla of semicircular canal (anatomy)

    human ear: Semicircular canals: …has an expanded end, the ampulla, which opens into the vestibule. The ampullae of the horizontal and superior canals lie close together, just above the oval window, but the ampulla of the posterior canal opens on the opposite side of the vestibule. The other ends of the superior and posterior…

  • ampulla of semicircular duct (anatomy)

    human ear: Semicircular canals: …diameter that has its own ampulla. The membranous ducts and ampullae follow the same pattern as the canals and ampullae of the bony labyrinth, with their openings into the utricle and with a common crus for the superior and posterior ducts. Like the other parts of the membranous labyrinth, they…

  • ampulla of Vater (anatomy)

    endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatoscopy: …the duodenum to visualize the ampulla of Vater, the opening of the common bile duct into the duodenum. This enables the injection of a radiopaque dye into the common bile duct. The injection of dye permits radiographic, or X-ray, visualization of the common bile duct and the pancreatic duct. This…

  • ampulla tubae uterinae (anatomy)

    fallopian tube: …the fallopian tube called the ampulla. The isthmus is a small region, only about 2 cm (0.8 inch) long, that connects the ampulla and infundibulum to the uterus. The final region of the fallopian tube, known as the intramural, or uterine, part, is located in the top portion (fundus) of…

  • ampullae (flask)

    Ampulla, a small narrow-necked, round-bodied vase for holding liquids, especially oil and perfumes. It was used in the ancient Mediterranean for toilet purposes and for anointing the bodies of the dead, being then buried with them. In early medieval times in Europe, ampullae were used in a

  • ampullar heart (anatomy)

    circulatory system: Hearts: …and insects may have additional ampullar hearts at the points of attachment of many of their appendages.

  • ampullar pregnancy (obstetrics)

    pregnancy: Ectopic pregnancy: Ampullar pregnancies, which are by far the most common, usually terminate either in a tubal abortion, in which the embryo and the developing afterbirth are expelled through the open end of the tube into the abdomen; by a tubal rupture; or, less commonly, by absorption…

  • Ampullaria (snail)

    limpkin: …large, greenish, freshwater snails (Ampullaria). These, carried to its nest or favourite feeding perch and held firmly in one foot, are struck several powerful blows with the bill, which is then forced into the spiral opening of the shell to pull out the snail. The limpkin’s bulky nest of…

  • Ampullariidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …(Viviparidae) and tropical regions (Ampullariidae); frequently used in freshwater aquariums with tropical fish. Superfamily Littorinacea Periwinkles, on rocky shores (Littorinidae) of all oceans; land snails of the West Indies, part of Africa, and Europe (Pomatiasidae). Superfamily Rissoacea

  • ampullary crest (anatomy)

    inner ear: Equilibrium: …houses a ridge called the ampullary crest (or crista), containing still more hair cells. These cells respond to motion of the endolymph fluid caused by motion of the head in any direction; they transmit signals indicating changes of position through the vestibular nerve.

  • Ampurias (ancient city, Spain)

    Phocaea: …as Massilia (Marseille, France) and Emporion (Ampurias in northeastern Spain). When Phocaea was besieged by the Persians about 545 bce, most of the citizens chose emigration rather than submission. In 190 bce, allied with the Seleucids against Rome and Pergamum, the Phocaeans so savagely repelled the Roman forces that the…

  • amputation (medicine)

    Amputation, in medicine, removal of any part of the body. Commonly the term is restricted to mean surgical removal of a part of or an entire limb, either upper or lower extremity. The reasons for surgical amputation in general are injury, infection, tumour, diabetes, or insufficient blood supply.

  • Amputations (poetry by MacDonald)

    Cynthia Macdonald: Amputations (1972), her first published volume of poetry, attracted attention with its startling imagery. Almost all the poems in the collection concern misfits who have undergone physical amputation or who feel disassociated from society. Continuing the theme of separateness and alienation, Macdonald placed the subjects…

  • amputee (medicine)

    Amputation, in medicine, removal of any part of the body. Commonly the term is restricted to mean surgical removal of a part of or an entire limb, either upper or lower extremity. The reasons for surgical amputation in general are injury, infection, tumour, diabetes, or insufficient blood supply.

  • Amr Bey, F. D. (Egyptian athlete)

    squash rackets: History: Amr Bey, an Egyptian amateur who won several British open titles in the 1930s; the Khans of Pakistan, a family of professional players and teachers who often dominated open play from the 1950s to the 1990s; Janet Morgan, British women’s champion from 1949–50 to 1958–59…

  • ʿAmr ebn Leys̄ (Ṣaffārid governor)

    Iran: The Ṣaffārids: …caliph reluctantly confirmed Yaʿqūb’s brother ʿAmr as governor of Fārs and Khorāsān but withdrew his recognition on three occasions, and ʿAmr’s authority was disclaimed to the Khorāsānian pilgrims to Mecca when they passed through Baghdad. But ʿAmr remained useful to Baghdad so long as Khorāsān was victimized by the rebels…

  • ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ (Arab general)

    ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ, the Arab conqueror of Egypt. A wealthy member of the Banū Sahm clan of the important tribe of Quraysh, ʿAmr accepted Islām in 629–630. Sent to Oman, in southeastern Arabia, by the Prophet Muḥammad, he successfully completed his first mission by converting its rulers to Islām. As

  • ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ, Mosque of (mosque, Cairo, Egypt)

    Mosque of ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ, earliest Islāmic building in Egypt, erected in 641 by ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ, the leader of an invading Arab army. The mosque was built in Al-Fusṭāṭ, a city that grew out of an Arab army encampment on the site of present-day Cairo. Though originally a modest structure, it was

  • ʿAmr ibn Baḥr (Muslim theologian and scholar)

    Al-Jāḥiẓ, Islamic theologian, intellectual, and litterateur known for his individual and masterful Arabic prose. His family, possibly of Ethiopian origin, had only modest standing in Basra, but his intellect and wit gained him acceptance in scholarly circles and in society. During the reign of the

  • ʿAmr ibn Hind (Lakhmid king of al-Ḥīrah)

    ʿAmr ibn Kulthūm: …and, according to tradition, killed ʿAmr ibn Hind, the Arab king of Al-Ḥīrah, c. 568.

  • ʿAmr ibn Kulthūm (Arab poet)

    ʿAmr ibn Kulthūm, pre-Islamic Arab poet whose qaṣīdah (“ode”) is one of the seven that comprise the celebrated anthology of pre-Islamic verse Al-Muʿallaqāt. Little is known of his life; he became chief of the tribe of Taghlib in Mesopotamia at an early age and, according to tradition, killed ʿAmr

  • ʿAmr ibn ʿUbayd (Muslim theologian)

    Muʿtazilah: …same story is told of ʿAmr ibn ʿUbayd [died 762].) Variously maligned as free thinkers and heretics, the Muʿtazilah, in the 8th century ce, were the first Muslims to use the categories and methods of Hellenistic philosophy to derive their three major and distinctive dogmatic points.

  • Amra Choluim Chille (work by Dallán Forgaill)

    Dallán Forgaill: …the Amra Choluim Chille, or Elegy of St. Columba, one of the earliest Irish poems of any length. The poem was composed after St. Columba’s death in 597 in the alliterative, accentual poetic form of the period, in stanzas of irregular length. It has survived in the language of later…

  • ʿÂmra, el- (archaeological site, Egypt)

    Amratian culture: …Upper Egypt, its type-site being Al-ʿĀmirah near modern Abydos. Numerous sites, dating to about 3600 bce, have been excavated and reveal an agricultural way of life similar to that of the preceding Badarian culture but with advanced skills and techniques. Pottery characteristic of this period includes black-topped red ware and…

  • AMRAAM (missile)

    rocket and missile system: Air-to-air: …the third category was the AIM-120 AMRAAM (for advanced medium-range air-to-air missile), jointly developed by the U.S. Air Force and Navy for use with NATO aircraft. AMRAAM combined inertial mid-course guidance with active radar homing.

  • Amram bar Sheshna (Jewish scholar)

    Amram bar Sheshna, head of the Talmudic academy at Sura, Babylonia, traditionally regarded as the first Jewish authority to write a complete domestic and synagogal liturgy for the year, the Siddur Rav Amram (“Order of Prayers of Rabbi Amram”). Amram’s work, forerunner in this field of those of

  • Amran ibn Ali (archaeological site, Iraq)

    Babylon: The present site: …and the Emakh temple, (3) Amran ibn Ali, the ruins of Esagila, (4) Merkez, marking the ancient residential area east of Esagila, (5) Humra, containing rubble removed by Alexander from the ziggurat in preparation for rebuilding, and a theatre he built with material from the ziggurat, and (6) Ishin Aswad,…

  • Amraoti (India)

    Amravati, city, northeastern Maharashtra state, western India. It lies in an upland area about 85 miles (135 km) west of Nagpur. The city occupies an important position near passes through the hills that separate the cotton-growing regions of the Purna River basin (west) and the Wardha River basin

  • Amratian culture (ancient Egypt)

    Amratian culture, Egyptian Predynastic cultural phase, centred in Upper Egypt, its type-site being Al-ʿĀmirah near modern Abydos. Numerous sites, dating to about 3600 bce, have been excavated and reveal an agricultural way of life similar to that of the preceding Badarian culture but with advanced

  • Amravati (India)

    Amravati, city, northeastern Maharashtra state, western India. It lies in an upland area about 85 miles (135 km) west of Nagpur. The city occupies an important position near passes through the hills that separate the cotton-growing regions of the Purna River basin (west) and the Wardha River basin

  • Amreli (India)

    Amreli, city, southwestern Gujarat state, west-central India. It lies in the southeast-central part of the Kathiawar Peninsula, 125 miles (200 km) southwest of Ahmadabad. Amreli is primarily a commercial centre. Its industries include the manufacture of khadi (coarse cotton cloth), tanning, silver

  • Amri (archaeological site, India)

    India: Principal sites: …the Early Harappan Period was Amri in 1929. In 1948 the British archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler discovered a small deposit of pottery stratified below the remains of the mature Indus city at Harappa. The next site to be excavated with a view to uncovering the Early Harappan Period was Kot…

  • ʿAmri (king of Israel)

    Omri, (reigned 876–869 or c. 884–c. 872 bce), king of Israel, father of Ahab, and founder of a dynasty that remained in power for some 50 years. Omri is mentioned briefly and unfavourably in the Hebrew Bible (1 Kings 16; Micah 6:16). Extrabiblical sources, however, paint a picture of a dynamic and

  • amrit (Sikhism)

    Sikhism: Rites and festivals: This represents the amrit (“nectar”), which is stirred with a double-edged sword by one of the five Sikhs. After the recitation of certain works of the Gurus, which is followed by Ardas, the candidates for initiation drink five handfuls of amrit offered to them. Each time, the Sikh…

  • amrit pahul (Sikhism)

    Khalsa: More commonly called amrit pahul (“the nectar ceremony”) but also known as khande ki pahul (literally, “ceremony of the double-edged sword”), it was centred on a belief in the transformative power of the revealed word. The word was recited while water for initiation was stirred with a double-edged…

  • amrit sanskar (Sikhism)

    Sikhism: Guru Gobind Singh and the founding of the Khalsa: Gobind Singh then commenced the amrit sanskar (“nectar ceremony”), the service of initiation for the Panj Piare. When the rite was concluded, the Guru himself was initiated by the Panj Piare. The order was then opened to anyone wishing to join, and Sikh tradition reports that enormous crowds responded.

  • Amrit-Dhari (Sikh religious group)

    Sikhism: Other groups: …these Sikhs are known as Amrit-Dhari Sikhs. They are also, of course, Kes-Dharis. Thus, all Amrit-Dharis are Kes-Dharis, though not all Kes-Dharis are Amrit-Dharis. Here too any estimate of numbers must rely on guesswork, but it is likely that Amrit-Dharis account for 15 to 18 percent of all Sikhs.

  • amrita (Hindu mythology)

    churning of the ocean of milk: …the elixir of immortality, the amrita, from the depths of the cosmic ocean. Mount Mandara—a spur of Mount Meru, the world axis—was torn out to use as a churning stick and was steadied at the bottom of the ocean by Vishnu in his avatar (incarnation) as the tortoise Kurma. The…

  • Amrita (work by Jhabvala)

    Ruth Prawer Jhabvala: …Will (1955; also published as Amrita) and The Nature of Passion (1956), won much critical acclaim for their comic depiction of Indian society and manners. She was often compared to Jane Austen for her microscopic studies of a tightly conventional world. Her position as both insider and detached observer allowed…

  • Amritsar (India)

    Amritsar, city, northern Punjab state, northwestern India. It lies about 15 miles (25 km) east of the border with Pakistan. Amritsar is the largest and most important city in Punjab and is a major commercial, cultural, and transportation centre. It is also the centre of Sikhism and the site of the

  • Amritsar Temple (temple, Amritsar, India)

    Harmandir Sahib, the chief gurdwara, or house of worship, of Sikhism and the Sikhs’ most important pilgrimage site. It is located in the city of Amritsar, Punjab state, northwestern India. The first Harmandir Sahib was built in 1604 by Arjan, the fifth Sikh Guru, who symbolically had it placed on a

  • Amritsar, Massacre of (India [1919])

    Jallianwala Bagh Massacre, incident on April 13, 1919, in which British troops fired on a large crowd of unarmed Indians in an open space known as the Jallianwala Bagh in Amritsar in the Punjab region (now in Punjab state) of India, killing several hundred people and wounding many hundreds more. It

  • Amritsar, Treaty of (United Kingdom-India [1809])

    Treaty of Amritsar, (April 25, 1809), pact concluded between Charles T. Metcalfe, representing the British East India Company, and Ranjit Singh, head of the Sikh kingdom of Punjab. The treaty settled Indo-Sikh relations for a generation. The immediate occasion was the French threat to northwestern

  • Amroha (India)

    Amroha, city, northwestern Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It is located west-northwest of Moradabad on the Sot River. The city is a marketplace for agricultural produce. Its chief industries are hand-loom weaving, pottery making, and sugar milling. Colleges affiliated with Dr. B.R. Ambedkar

  • Amrouche, Jean (Algerian poet)

    Jean Amrouche, foremost poet of the earliest generation of French-speaking North African writers. Amrouche was born into one of the few Roman Catholic families in the Litte Kabylie mountains but immigrated with his family to Tunisia when still quite young. He completed his studies in Tunis and

  • Amrouche, Marguerite Taos (Algerian singer and writer)

    Marguerite Taos Amrouche, Kabyle singer and writer. Amrouche was the daughter of Fadhma Aïth Mansour Amrouche; she was the only sister in a family of six sons and was born after the family had moved to Tunisia to escape persecution after their conversion to Roman Catholicism. Despite this exile,

  • Amrouche, Marie-Louise (Algerian singer and writer)

    Marguerite Taos Amrouche, Kabyle singer and writer. Amrouche was the daughter of Fadhma Aïth Mansour Amrouche; she was the only sister in a family of six sons and was born after the family had moved to Tunisia to escape persecution after their conversion to Roman Catholicism. Despite this exile,

  • Amsberg, Claus George Willem Otto Frederik Geert von (prince of The Netherlands)

    Prince Claus, (Claus Georg Wilhelm Otto Friedrich Gerd von Amsberg), German-born Dutch royal (born Sept. 6, 1926, Dötzingen, Ger.—died Oct. 6, 2002, Amsterdam, Neth.), was the consort of Queen Beatrix of The Netherlands. When Claus married then crown princess Beatrix in March 1966, he faced p

  • Amsdorf, Nikolaus von (German theologian)

    Nikolaus von Amsdorf, Protestant Reformer and major supporter of Martin Luther. Educated at Leipzig and then at Wittenberg, where he became a theology professor in 1511, Amsdorf attended the Leipzig debate with Luther in 1519 and the Diet of Worms two years later, where he participated in the plan

  • amshaspend (Zoroastrianism)

    Amesha spenta, (Avestan: “beneficent immortal”) in Zoroastrianism, any of the six divine beings or archangels created by Ahura Mazdā, the Wise Lord, to help govern creation. Three are male, three female. Ministers of his power against the evil spirit, Ahriman, they are depicted clustered about

  • Amsler, Jacob (Swiss mathematician)

    planimeter: …invented by the Swiss mathematician Jacob Amsler about 1854. It consists of a pole arm, or bar, which has a weight at one end, and a tracer arm, the end of which has a point that the operator guides around the boundary of the area in question. Both arms rest…

  • Amsonia (plant genus)

    Apocynaceae: Major genera and species: Dogbane (Apocynum) and bluestar (Amsonia) are sometimes grown as ornamentals. The impala lily (Adenium multiflorum) is an ornamental shrub with star-shaped flowers and large underground tubers.

  • Amsteg (Switzerland)

    Switzerland: Rural communities: …within the Alps, such as Amsteg on the Saint Gotthard Pass (Uri canton), Silvaplana, where the Julier Pass meets the Inn valley (the upper Engadin), and Gordola, at the junction of the Verzasca valley (Val Verzasca) and the Ticino River plain (near Locarno). In the Mittelland, with its abundant lakes,…

  • Amstel River (river, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: The city layout: The Amstel River flows from south to north through the city toward the IJ. Parts of the city lie below sea level, some of them on land that has been reclaimed from the sea or from marshes or lakes.

  • Amstelveen (Netherlands)

    Amstelveen, gemeente (municipality), western Netherlands, near the Amstel River. Amstelveen (meaning “peat bog on the Amstel”) was formerly a village in the municipality of Nieuwer-Amstel. A residential suburb of Amsterdam, it is a water-sports centre with some agriculture and light industry.

  • Amsterdam (work by McEwan)

    Ian McEwan: The novel Amsterdam (1998), a social satire influenced by the early works of Evelyn Waugh, won the Booker Prize in 1998. Atonement (2001; film 2007) traces over six decades the consequences of a lie told in the 1930s.

  • Amsterdam (national capital, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, city and port, western Netherlands, located on the IJsselmeer and connected to the North Sea. It is the capital and the principal commercial and financial centre of the Netherlands. To the scores of tourists who visit each year, Amsterdam is known for its historical attractions, for its

  • Amsterdam (New York, United States)

    Amsterdam, city, Montgomery county, eastern New York, U.S. It lies along the Mohawk River, 16 miles (26 km) northwest of Schenectady. Settled by Albert Veeder in 1783, it was known as Veedersburg until it was renamed for Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1804. Its location on the Mohawk Trail, the

  • Amsterdam 1928 Olympic Games

    Amsterdam 1928 Olympic Games, athletic festival held in Amsterdam, that took place May 17–Aug. 12, 1928. The Amsterdam Games were the eighth occurrence of the modern Olympic Games. Track-and-field and gymnastics events were added to the women’s slate at the 1928 Olympics. There was much criticism

  • Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (airport, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    airport: Pier and satellite designs: …International Airport in Germany and Schiphol Airport near Amsterdam still use such terminals. In the late 1970s, pier designs at Chicago’s O’Hare and Atlanta’s Hartsfield successfully handled in excess of 45 million mainly domestic passengers per year. However, as the number of aircraft gates grows, the distances that a passenger…

  • Amsterdam albatross (bird)

    albatross: The Amsterdam albatross (D. amsterdamensis) has a wingspread of 280–340 cm (9–11 feet). Once thought to be a subspecies of the wandering albatross, it was shown by DNA analysis in 2011 to have diverged from the wandering albatross more than 265,000 years ago. The species exists…

  • Amsterdam Cabinet, Master of the (German painter and engraver)

    Master of the Housebook, anonymous late Gothic painter and engraver who was one of the outstanding early printmakers. He was formerly referred to as the Master of the Amsterdam Cabinet because the Rijksprentenkabinet, the print room of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, has the largest collection of his

  • Amsterdam Historical Museum (museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Amsterdam: Cultural life: …the Anne Frank House, the Amsterdam Historical Museum, the Dutch Maritime Museum, and the Rembrandt House.

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