Cars & Other Vehicles

Automobile, byname auto, also called motorcar or car, a usually four-wheeled vehicle designed primarily for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel.

Cars & Other Vehicles Encyclopedia Articles

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Electric automobile
Electric automobile, battery-powered motor vehicle, originating in the late 1880s and used for private passenger, truck, and bus transportation. Through the early period of the automotive industry until about 1920, electric automobiles were competitive with petroleum-fueled cars particularly as...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
electric automobile
Ship
Ship, any large floating vessel capable of crossing open waters, as opposed to a boat, which is generally a smaller craft. The term formerly was applied to sailing vessels having three or more masts; in modern times it usually denotes a vessel of more than 500 tons of displacement. Submersible...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
Passenger ship in a shipyard at Papenburg, Ger.
Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, American automotive corporation founded in 1903 by Henry Ford and 11 associate investors. In 1919 the company was reincorporated, with Ford, his wife, Clara, and his son, Edsel, acquiring full ownership; they, their heirs, and the Ford Foundation (formed 1936) were sole...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
Ford Motor Company: headquarters
Rapid transit
Rapid transit, system of railways, usually electric, that is used for local transit in a metropolitan area. A rapid transit line may run underground (subway), above street level (elevated transit line), or at street level. Rapid transit is distinguished from other forms of mass transit by its...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
A train departing from a London Underground subway station.
Model T
Model T, automobile built by the Ford Motor Company from 1908 until 1927. Conceived by Henry Ford as practical, affordable transportation for the common man, it quickly became prized for its low cost, durability, versatility, and ease of maintenance. More than 15 million Model Ts were built in...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
Model T
Taxicab
Taxicab, chauffeur-driven automobile available for hire to carry passengers between any two points within a city or its suburbs for a fare determined by a meter or zone system or a flat rate. The taxicab is named after the taximeter, an instrument invented by Wilhelm Bruhn in 1891 that ...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
taxicab station
Roads and highways
Roads and highways, traveled way on which people, animals, or wheeled vehicles move. In modern usage the term road describes a rural, lesser traveled way, while the word street denotes an urban roadway. Highway refers to a major rural traveled way; more recently it has been used for a road, in...
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Dubai, United Arab Emirates: Sheikh Zayed Road
Jeep
Jeep, outstanding light vehicle of World War II. It was developed by the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps and was an important item in lend-lease shipments to the Soviet Union and other allies. The jeep weighed 1 14 tons, was powered by a four-cylinder engine, and was classed as a quarter-ton truck in...
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Willys MB jeep
Lee Iacocca
Lee Iacocca, American automobile executive who was president (1978–92) and chairman of the board (1979–92) of Chrysler Corporation, credited with reviving the foundering company. He notably secured the largest amount of federal financial assistance ever given to a private corporation at that time....
Biography
Lee Iacocca.
Mass transit
Mass transit, the movement of people within urban areas using group travel technologies such as buses and trains. The essential feature of mass transportation is that many people are carried in the same vehicle (e.g., buses) or collection of attached vehicles (trains). This makes it possible to...
Encyclopedia / Cars & Other Vehicles
A train departing from a London Underground subway station.

Cars & Other Vehicles Encyclopedia Articles

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